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Spring 2020 Courses

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PSC/IR 102 Introduction to International Political Economy
Randall Stone
Spring 2020 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
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All politics are global politics. Global flows of trade, capital and labor transform societies, unleash new political movements and challenge existing political institutions. States and other actors respond in ways that impose costs on other states, creating crises and opportunities for cooperation. This course will broadly survey the politics of international economics, focusing in particular on trade and finance. Along the way, it will introduce students to a range of economic models, but it will assume no prior exposure to economics.


PSC 105 Introduction to American Politics
Mary A. Kroeger
Spring 2020 — MWF 9:00 - 9:50
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Introduces students to the foundations of American government. Examines important political institutions and the linkage mechanisms that connect institutions, political actors, and ordinary American citizens.


PSC 200 Data Analysis I
Kevin A. Clarke
Spring 2020 — MWF 14:00 - 14:50
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Data analysis has become a key part of many fields including politics, business, law, and public policy. This course covers the fundamentals of data analysis, giving students the necessary statistical skills to understand and critically analyze contemporary political, legal, and policy puzzles. Lectures will focus on the theory and practice of quantitative analysis, and lab sessions will guide students through the particulars of statistical software. Core topics include descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing, and linear regression. No prior knowledge of statistics or data analysis is required. Without special permission of the instructor, students may not enroll in this course if they have earned credit and a letter grade for ECO 230, PSC 205, PSY/CSP 211, STT 211, STT 212, STT 213, STT 214, or any other course in statistics, or if they have received a score of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement exam in Statistics.


PSC 205 Data Analysis II
Curtis S. Signorino
Spring 2020 — TR 11:05 - 12:20
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This course builds on PSC 200, Data Analysis I, taking the linear regression model as its starting point. We will explore various statistical techniques for analyzing a world of data that is relevant to political science in particular, and to the social sciences more broadly. We will examine models for binary data, durations, counts, censoring and truncation, self-selection, and strategic choice, among others. These models will be applied to topics such as international conflict, civil war onset, parliamentary cabinet survival, international sanctions, campaign contributions, and voting. Students will be taught how to (1) frame research hypotheses, (2) analyze data using the appropriate statistical model, and (3) interpret and present their results. Statistical analysis will be conducted using R. Prerequisites: Students should have taken a course (such as PSC 200, ECO 230, STT 211, STT 212, STT 213, or STT 214) that introduces them to hypothesis tests, confidence intervals, and linear regression.


IR 223 Opposition in an Authoritarian State: Poland, 1945-1989
Maciej Turek
Spring 2020 — TR 18:15 - 19:30
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One of the common features of authoritarian regimes is a limited pluralism and disrupted relationship of authorities and opposition. The ruling regime denies a political representation to vast segments of society, as it allows the authorities to hold unaccountable power and further its ideology. Even if the people are far from being unanimous, living in the closed, captive society equals lack of opportunities for disseminating the ideas challenging official line. Yet the power of the powerless, to use Vaclav Havel's phrase, lies in the constant dropping in the hope that one day it will wear the stone. Thus the role of opposition to the authoritarian regimes, even if its activities might seem hopeless, cannot be underestimated.

In this course, we will take a look on history of communism in Polish People's Republic (PPR) - from establishing the regime to the Round Table Talks - through democratic opposition perspective. During the semester, we will deal with several questions, including what was the nature of activities of Polish opposition? What were they ideas and political thought? How was the opposition structured? Which actions undertook by the ruling communist party (Polish United Workers' Party, or PZPR) triggered the society - the masses and the individuals - to join the opposition in their efforts of 'constant dropping the stone'? In order to answer these questions, we are going to take a look on major events in the Polish People's Republic history. We will scrutinize major actors of the opposition, both institutions (the Church, Radio Free Europe, KOR, Solidarity), and leading individuals (Stefan Wyszynski, Jan Nowak Jezioranski, Adam Michnik, Karol Modzelewski, Jacek Kuro?, Antoni Macierewicz, Lech Walesa, Andrzej Gwiazda, Jozef Pinior, and others), and discuss their goals and means they were using the achieve them. At the end of the semester we will also debate the nature of the Polish revolution of 1989 and investigate how it ended and why did this happen without a single gunshot.


PSC 224 Incarceration Nation
Joshua Dubler
Spring 2020 — MW 16:50 - 18:05
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How does a country with five percent of the world's population, a country that nominally values freedom above all else, come to have nearly a quarter of the world's incarcerated people? In this survey course we investigate the history of imprisonment in the United States—as theorized and as practiced—from the founding of the republic to the present day. Special attention is paid to the politics, economics, race politics, and religious logics of contemporary mass incarceration, and to the efforts afoot to end mass incarceration.


PSC 226 Act Locally? Local Government in the U.S.
Stuart Jordan
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05 - 12:20
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Reformers and activists sometimes say that we should "think globally, act locally," meaning that we should try to address widespread needs by taking action in our neighborhoods, towns and cities. What happens when you apply this maxim to government and public policy in the United States? This course will introduce you to local government policymaking in the United States, with a focus on urban areas. You'll gain a familiarity with the powers local governments have over key policies and services—such as policing and criminal justice, housing and land-use regulation, transportation, public education and public health—and learn to think systematically about what local governments can do to address public needs. What you learn will be applicable throughout the U.S., but we'll focus on examples of policymaking currently underway in the City of Rochester and the surrounding region—offering you a chance to learn more about the University's local community.


PSC 227 Designing American Democracy
Dan Alexander
Spring 2020 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
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When can Congress agree on the best policy for the country (and what does "best" even mean)? How does the electoral college affect Presidential campaigns? How does the Supreme Court choose what cases to hear? This course uses a rigorous set of tools, including game theory and statistics, as well as a wide-range of historical and contemporary readings to help students understand the structure of American government in theory and practice. With these tools, we will study US electoral systems, Congress, the Presidency and the executive branch, federalism, and the courts, with a focus on the challenges of group decision making and the inevitable conflicts that arise between the branches of government as well as between the government and the rest of society. Students will leave the course with a deeper understanding of the many ongoing debates around the design of American democracy. No prior background in game theory or statistics is necessary for this course.


PSC 228 Race, Ethnicity, and American Politics
Mayya Komisarchik
Spring 2020 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
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This is an undergraduate course designed to explore the role that race and ethnicity play in American politics. In this class students will focus on the 'big questions' surrounding race: What is race? Can race be measured - and, if so, how? How have questions about race and ethnicity shaped American legal, social, cultural, and political institutions? How have Americans thought about race and immigration throughout the 21st century, and how have these opinions shaped political engagement and behavior? This course will focus on political science theories and research about race and politics, though we will also draw on work from history, sociology, law, and economics.


PSC 230 Public Health Law and Policy
Molly McNulty
Spring 2020 — MW 10:25 - 11:40
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The course introduces the legal and social justice frameworks for urgent public health issues, such as vaccinations, tobacco regulation and gun control.


PSC 231 Maternal, Child & Adolescent Health: Policy & Advocacy
Molly McNulty
Spring 2020 — TR 14:00 - 15:15
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Students will learn how government funds, organizes and delivers health care, broadly defined, to mothers, children, and adolescents; as well as legal and policy writing skills relevant to advocacy, such as issue fact sheets, legislative testimony, and letters to the editor.


PSC 232 Disagreement in a Democratic Society
David Primo
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — M 14:00 - 16:40
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Is consensus overrated? In this seminar course we will study the role of disagreement in a democratic society. Topics will include the causes and consequences of political polarization, academic freedom and viewpoint diversity on college campuses, and conflict as a tool for innovation.


PSC 235 The Political Economy of U.S. Food Policy
Dan Alexander
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — MW 10:25 - 11:40
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The course examines how reforms to food policy in the United States make their way through the democratic process and how these reforms constitute efforts to democratize our food system, exploring how these efforts confront the same challenges that a democracy faces more broadly. How does our political system approach the task of reconciling the diverse preferences of the American public and the corporations that feed it, agricultural and health agencies, and the food activists and advocacy groups? How do we think about the concepts of representativeness, access, information, centralization, externalities, and regulation in the context of our food system?


PSC 238 Business and Politics
David Primo
Spring 2020 — TR 11:05 - 12:20
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In this course we will use the tools of political science and economics to study how corporations affect and are affected by politics. Each meeting will feature a general topic as well as in-depth analysis of cases related to that topic. We will cover a broad range of issues affecting the business world, including regulation, lawmaking, the mass media, interest group mobilization, and corporate social responsibility. Cases will be drawn from areas such as antitrust, transportation,health care, and the environment. Course meetings will generally begin with a short lecture followed by extensive class discussion.


PSC/IR 239 International Environmental Law & Policy
Terry Noto
Spring 2020 — TR 15:25 - 16:40
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An examination of international environmental law and policy with a special focus on efforts to address climate change, including efforts to forge an international climate change agreement at the 2015 United Nations Paris Climate Change Conference. This course serves as a companion to PSC 246, but PSC 246 is not a prerequisite. The goal of this course is to provide a foundational understanding of this rapidly developing, controversial field. Topics include consideration of the scientific, political, and economic drivers of international environmental law; the variety of tools (e.g., treaties, agreements, "soft law," voluntary incentive programs and market based approaches); and examples of how some international environmental issues have been addressed to date. Finally, we will examine the results of the 2015 Paris Climate Change Conference - are we any closer to a "grand climate solution"? This course will be taught through lectures, discussion, several concise papers, and a group project.


PSC 240 Criminal Procedure and Constitutional Principles
Edward L. Fiandach
Spring 2020 — MW 16:50 - 18:05
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Through analysis of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, we examine criminal procedure as elaborated by federal and state court decisions. Topics include arrest procedures, search and seizure, right to counsel, and police interrogation and confessions. We will discuss the theoretical principles of criminal procedure and the application of those principles to the actual operation of the criminal court system.


PSC 249 Environmental Policy in Action
Terry Noto
Spring 2020 — T 16:50 - 19:30
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An examination of the role of environmental organizations in the development and implementation of environmental policy through experiential and academic learning. This is a small class that meets once a week. Through assigned readings, discussion and lectures, we will examine how environmental groups are formed, organized, funded and staffed to fulfill various objectives, and how the role/mission they play in developing and implementing environmental policy has evolved. Students will deepen their understanding of these issues through first-hand experience working on "real world" research for a local environmental organization. Each student will be responsible for a final paper examining these issues through the lens of a particular conservation or environmental group, completion of the project for the environmental group partner, and class discussion/participation. This course is instructor permission only and is limited to upper level students. PSC 246 or PSC 239 is a prerequisite.


PSC/IR 255 Poverty and Development
Anderson Frey
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05 - 12:20
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Why are some countries poor, while others enjoy a high standard of living? Why some enjoy stability and freedoms, while others suffer with corruption, repression and violence? Why countries stagnate or decline in their economic development. This course is designed to provide a broad theoretical framework for thinking about these problems, focusing on the political and institutional causes of differences in economic development across countries.


PSC/IR 259 Order, Violence, and the State
Scott Abramson
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05 - 12:20
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Why are some societies plagued by endemic violence and others peaceful? How do peaceful, ordered societies emerge and persist? This course answers these questions by examining the origins of political order over a long-span of human history. Using the tools of modern social science as well as historical and anthropological source material we will explore how states emerged from anarchy, how they have come to control the use of force, and the implications of political order for material well-being and prosperity. Each student is expected to develop and briefly present a research paper which investigates a relevant issue of interest. Students who take PSC 212 (Supreme Court in U.S. History) or PSC/IR 259 (Order, Violence, and the State) in or before the Fall 2019 semester may use this course to satisfy Team Learning, but the course may not be used to satisfy this requirement if it is taken after the Fall 2019 semester.


PSC/IR 260 Democratic Erosion
Gretchen Helmke
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — T 11:05 - 13:45
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Is American democracy under threat? What about democracy in the West, or the world more generally? How can we detect if democracies are eroding? Democratic Erosion is a new upper-level undergraduate seminar, based on a cross-university collaboration, which is aimed at evaluating threats to democracy both in the United States and abroad through the lens of theory, history and social science. Importantly, the class is not intended as a partisan critique, but rather teaches students how to answer questions about democratic erosion using both analytical and empirical tools. Not open to first years and sophomores.


PSC/IR 265 Civil War and the International System
Bethany Lacina
Spring 2020 — MW 9:00 - 10:15
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Addresses the question of when and where civil wars occur and what their effects are domestically and internationally. Also examine role played by external actors in civil war, such as financial support to governments or insurgents, armed interventions, and peacekeeping missions.


PSC/IR 270 Mechanisms of International Relations
Hein Goemans
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — W 15:25 - 18:05
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The last ten years or so have seen a major revolution in the social sciences. Instead of trying to discover and test grand "covering laws" that have universal validity and tremendous scope (think Newton's gravity or Einstein's relativity), the social sciences are in the process of switching to more narrow and middle-range theories and explanations, often referred to as causal mechanisms. Mechanisms play a crucial role in this new conception of theory in the social sciences. In this course we will examine one particular mechanism each week and see how it has been applied in international political economy and/or security studies. Students will be introduced to formal reasoning in an informal manner. We will explore several substantive themes, such as the "democratic peace," ethnic conflict and international trade to illustrate the mechanisms and cumulative potential of this research approach.


PSC 287 Theories of Political Economy
James Johnson
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — MW 10:25 - 11:40
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In the past decade or so themes of poverty, inequality and power have taken center stage at the intersection of political science, philosophy & economics. This course will examine those themes. Our point of departure is local. The premise of the course is that Rochester and much of Western NY state are a developing country. We will focus on both the dire circumstances that make this characterization plausible and on potential innovative political and policy responses to those circumstances. We will address the nature of property, poverty, markets, development, firms and financial institutions. And overriding concern will be with the role of democratic commitments in political economic institutions. Readings will be drawn from John Dewey, Ronald Coase, Charles Lindblom, Jessica Gordon-Nembhard, Amartya Sen, Elinor Ostrom, and Roberto Unger among others. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required


PSC 288 Game Theory
Tasos Kalandrakis
Spring 2020 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
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Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.


PSC/IR 289 The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective
Joseph E. Inkori
Spring 2020 — T 14:00 - 16:40
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The debate on the role of the state versus that of the free market in the socioeconomic process is as old as the history of political economy. We discuss wheconomics of state policy and the long-run historical processes that created the political & economic conditions. Students' performance is based on three short essays (four typed pages each) presented to the class for discussion and thereafter revised for grading. No mid-term & final examinations.


PSC 290 Unequal Development and State Policy: Brazil, the U.S., and Nigeria
Joseph E. Inkori
Spring 2020 — MW 10:25 - 11:40
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The 2010 Brazilian national census shows 97.2 million Afro-Brazilians and 90.6 million Whites. These two ethnic nationalities have developed unequally since the establishment of colonial Brazil by Portugal in the sixteenth century. The 2010 census shows the average income of Afro-Brazilians was less than half that of White Brazilians. In 2009, the wealth gap between White and Black American families was $236,500. The most populous African nation, Nigeria, shows similar inequality among its major ethnic nationalities. This magnitude of inequality among ethnic nationalities has given rise to serious problems in inter-group relations in the three countries. This course aims to trace, comparatively, the historical origins of the phenomenon, examine the political and economic consequences, and discuss the politics and economics of state policy designed to address it. *NOTE: Students taking this Course for ECO credit must have previously taken ECO 108*


PSC 294 Political Economy of African-American Communities
James Johnson
Spring 2020 — MW 12:30 - 13:45
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The purpose of this course is to explore what has been called "democratic community economics" (Jessica Gordon-Nembhard) and its relevance for addressing deep, persistent political-economic problems in African American Communities. The focus will be on a set of alternative institutional arrangements including producer and consumer cooperatives, community development credit unions and community land trusts and specifically their roots in African American politics, their various current manifestations, and their potential contemporary policy relevance for promoting sustainable, local, community development.


PSC/IR 299 Law, Policy, and Social Good: Communicating Your Professional Identity
Kellie Hernandez
Spring 2020 — R 15:25 - 16:40
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This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, application essays, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (e.g., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester's end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today's competitive environment. Two-credit course; cannot be used to satisfy any requirements for the major or minor in Political Science or International Relations.This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, application essays, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (e.g., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester's end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today's competitive environment. Two-credit course; cannot be used to satisfy any requirements for the major or minor in Political Science or International Relations.


PSC 304 Urban Crime and Justice
Craig Doran
Spring 2020 — R 18:15 - 19:30
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This course offers a unique opportunity for students to engage critically with justice in courthouses in local communities. Students will participate in hands-on experiential work in a selected area of focus at the Monroe County Courthouse in Rochester. Areas of focus to choose from include adult criminal justice, juvenile justice, treatment courts, domestic violence court, court-community partnerships, or equity disparities in the court. Weekly class meetings include university faculty and Judge Craig Doran, Chief Supervising Judge of all courts in the region, who share their perspectives, research, and experience on the matters addressed by students at the courthouse. This provides students with immediate immersion in both the theoretical and practical applications of justice in society. This course requires students spend 6 hours per week at the Monroe County Courts at the Hall of Justice in Rochester.


PSC 393W Senior Honors Project
Scott Abramson
Spring 2020
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A year-long research project supervised by a faculty member in the department and culminating in a written work.


PSC 394 Local Law and Politics Internships
Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2020 ("W" Optional)
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Most internship placements are in the District Attorney's or Public Defender's offices or in the local offices of U.S. members of Congress or Senators. Other internships are available depending on student interest. Interns work 10-12 hours per week through the entire semester. Grades are primarily based on a research paper. Applicants should have an appropriate course background for the internship and at least a B average. Students must be accepted in the course before approaching an agency for an internship. Applications are available from Professor L. Powell and an interest meeting is held just before preregistration each semester.


PSC/IR 394A European Political Internship
Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2020
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Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.


PSC 394C Washington Semester Internship
Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2020
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PSC 399 Washington Semester
Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2020
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These internships provide an opportunity to learn experientially one or more of the following: how government functions; how public policies are created, adopted and implemented; and how political campaigns work. Students intern in Congress, the executive branch, party campaign committees, and lobbying and advocacy groups. For applications and information, students should contact Professor L. Powell. An interest meeting is held each semester.


PSC 405 Causal Inference
Anderson Frey
Spring 2020 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
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The goal of this course is to give students a comprehensive toolbox for reading and producing cutting-edge applied empirical research, with focus on the theory and practice behind causal inference in social sciences. We will cover treatment effects, experiments, panel data, differences-in-differences, instrumental variables, nonparametric regression, regression discontinuity, matching, synthetic control, and more. Students will read applied papers from both political science and economics, and write review reports examining research designs, identification strategies, and causal claims. They will also produce research proposals that will be presented in class. Applications will be taught with R.


PSC 408 Positive Political Theory
Tasos Kalandrakis
Spring 2020 — MW 10:00 - 11:30
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This course is part of a rigorous introduction to the main concepts and results in positive political theory. It is the second half of a two-course sequence consisting of PSC 407 and PSC 408. This course will focus on the basics of game theory, which analyzes individual behavior in strategic situations. It will also cover the mathematical tools required to express the theory. Examples and applications will be drawn from several different areas in political science, including the American Congress, voting, international relations, political economy, and law.


PSC 501 Professionalization for Research in Political Science
Alexander Lee
Spring 2020 — F 9:30 - 12:00
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This course introduces the process of conducting research in political science and presenting this research orally and in writing


PSC 504 Causal Inference
Anderson Frey
Spring 2020 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
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The goal of this course is to give students a comprehensive toolbox for reading and producing cutting-edge applied empirical research, with focus on the theory and practice behind causal inference in social sciences. We will cover treatment effects, experiments, panel data, differences-in-differences, instrumental variables, nonparametric regression, regression discontinuity, matching, synthetic control, and more. Students will read applied papers from both political science and economics, and write review reports examining research designs, identification strategies, and causal claims. They will also produce research proposals that will be presented in class. Applications will be taught with R.


PSC 506 Advanced Topics in Methods
Kevin A. Clarke, Curtis S. Signorino
Spring 2020 — MW 10:30 - 12:00
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This course is designed for graduate students intending to pursue political methodology as a major field. It covers advanced statistical methods that are not yet standard fare in political methodology courses: e.g., semiparametric methods, nonparametric regression, time-series econometrics, Bayesian methods, and ideal point estimation. Course content will vary year to year, and this semester will focus more heavily on Bayesian methods, simulation-based estimation, and ideal point estimation. As a research workshop, this course also allows students to pursue areas of individual interest in more depth, and therefore course content is determined based on the interests of both the professor and the students. Prerequisites: PSC 404, PSC 405, and PSC 505.


PSC 513 Interest Groups
Lawrence Rothenberg
Spring 2020 — M 14:00 - 16:40
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This course principally introduces students to the political science and political economy literatures on interest groups, with a special focus on how these groups operate in the context of American politics (however, contrast with other advanced and the European Union are included). This will include developing an understanding of the makeup of the group system, the contribution decision, the internal politics of organizations, and the role that groups play with respect to formal political institutions.


PSC 551 State-Building and Conflict
Scott Abramson, Bethany Lacina
Spring 2020 — T 14:00 - 16:40
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Civil order under girds all other political processes. When order exists, institutions that regulate violence within a specific population or jurisdiction. This course covers where order comes from, how it is sustained or challenged, and the emergence of states as the most common order-providing institutions. We also discuss how the boundaries between civil orders are created and eroded. We examine the roles of geography, political economy, ethnic identity, and nationalism in the boundaries between political communities.


PSC 571 Quantitative Approaches to International Politics
Hein Goemans
Spring 2020 — R 14:00 - 16:40
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This course examines statistical issues relevant to the study of international politics. We will consider issues such as strategic decision making, geographic interdependence, temporal dynamics, and the operationalization of major concepts, such as power. Of particular interest will be the use and limitations of dyadic data and cross-sectional time series data. Prerequisites: PSC 505 and PSC 572 (or similar course) required; PSC 506 recommended.


PSC 575 Topics in Political Economy
Myunghoon Kang
Spring 2020 — TR 12:30 - 13:45
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This course covers selected topics in political economy. The course content is selected by the instructor and varies from year to year. Possible topics include social choice theory, voting models, political agency, legislative bargaining, macro political economy, network theory, political economy of conflict, and development. Students may take this course more than once from different instructors.


PSC 576 Graduate Research Seminar
Scott Abramson, Lawrence Rothenberg
Spring 2020 — W 14:00 - 15:15
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Designed as a forum for upper-level doctoral students who have completed formal coursework to present ongoing research. Students regularly present research either stemming from their dissertations or from ancillary projects.


PSC 578 Theories of Civil Violence
Scott Tyson
Spring 2020 — W 14:00 - 16:40
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In this graduate seminar we will examine the growing formal and quantitative literature on political violence with a special emphasis on insurgency and civil war. The course will draw heavily on game theory and the potential outcome approach, and will require careful reading of 2-4 articles each week on topics including: terrorism, the causes and duration of civil war, revolution, and the institutional and organizational structure of insurgent organizations. The goal of the course is to improve students' ability to theoretically isolate and empirically identify important mechanisms when studying conflict and violence.