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Course List

PSCI 287 Theories of Political Economy

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  • Fall 2020
    James Johnson
    Fall 2020 — MW 11:50 - 13:05
    Course Syllabus

    In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of several scholars who have won the Nobel Prize in economics. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

  • Spring 2020
    James Johnson, James Johnson
    Spring 2020 ("W" Optional) — MW 10:25 - 11:40
    Course Syllabus

    In the past decade or so themes of poverty, inequality and power have taken center stage at the intersection of political science, philosophy & economics. This course will examine those themes. Our point of departure is local. The premise of the course is that Rochester and much of Western NY state are a developing country. We will focus on both the dire circumstances that make this characterization plausible and on potential innovative political and policy responses to those circumstances. We will address the nature of property, poverty, markets, development, firms and financial institutions. And overriding concern will be with the role of democratic commitments in political economic institutions. Readings will be drawn from John Dewey, Ronald Coase, Charles Lindblom, Jessica Gordon-Nembhard, Amartya Sen, Elinor Ostrom, and Roberto Unger among others. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required

  • Spring 2019
    James Johnson
    Spring 2019 ("W" Optional) — MW 9:00 - 10:15
    Course Syllabus

    In the past decade or so themes of poverty, inequality and power have taken center stage at the intersection of political science, philosophy & economics. This course will examine those themes. Our point of departure is local. The premise of the course is that Rochester and much of Western NY state are a developing country. We will focus on both the dire circumstances that make this characterization plausible and on potential innovative political and policy responses to those circumstances. We will address the nature of property, poverty, markets, development, firms and financial institutions. And overriding concern will be with the role of democratic commitments in political economic institutions. Readings will be drawn from John Dewey, Ronald Coase, Charles Lindblom, Jessica Gordon-Nembhard, Amartya Sen, Elinor Ostrom, and Roberto Unger among others. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

  • Fall 2017
    James Johnson
    Fall 2017 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of scholars such as Amartya Sen, Elinor Ostrom, Roberto Unger, Dani Rodrik. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions such a property, markets, and democracy. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

  • Fall 2016
    James Johnson
    Fall 2016 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    Restriction: Instructor permission required. In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of scholars such as Amartya Sen, Elinor Ostrom, Roberto Unger, Dani Rodrik. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions such a property, markets, and democracy. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

  • Fall 2015
    James Johnson
    Fall 2015 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    Restriction: Instructor permission required. In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of scholars such as Amartya Sen, Elinor Ostrom, Roberto Unger, Dani Rodrik. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions such a property, markets, and democracy. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

  • Fall 2014
    James Johnson
    Fall 2014 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05 - 12:20
    Course Syllabus

    In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of several scholars who have won the Nobel Prize in economics. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.

  • Fall 2013
    James Johnson
    Fall 2013 — TR 11:05 - 12:20
    Course Syllabus

    In recent decades a number of important intellectual intersections have emerged between political science and economics. The course will explore these intersections as they appear in the work of several scholars who have won the Nobel Prize in economics. Our aim is to explore the analytical, explanatory and normative implications of this work in hopes of discerning lessons for thinking about enduring political issues and institutions. Some prior course work in economics or political science will be helpful but is not required.