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Undergraduate Program

Spanish Courses

Below is a list of recently offered undergraduate courses. Not all of these courses are offered in any given year, and there may be other courses offered some years. Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.

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SP 101 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

Intended for students with no background in Spanish, or whose background does not make placement in a higher-level Spanish course advisable. Training in speaking, comprehension, reading and writing through classroom instruction and recitation periods. Students must also register for the associated recitation section. Two or three exams; daily assignments.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 102 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II

Spanish 102 continues the work of the beginning course Spanish 101. There is added emphasis on reading comprehension, vocabulary building and culture. Students must also register for the associated recitation session. Two or three exams; daily assignments.

Prerequisites: SP 101 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 113 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY SPANISH

This six-credit course is designed for students with little or no background in Spanish and the desire to acquire comprehensive skills quickly. It offers intensive training in grammar, speaking, vocabulary building, oral comprehension, reading, and writing skills and prepares students for intermediate-level study. Six weeks, Monday–Thursday. Not open to students who have already taken SP 101 or 102.

Last Offered: Summer 2017

SP 151 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

Continuing study of modern Spanish in its spoken and written forms. Emphasis is given to cultural and literary readings and discussions, as well as composition- writing skills and Multimedia Center activities. Two exams; several compositions and rewrites.

Prerequisites: SP 102 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 152 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

Continuation of SP 151. Intended to advance conversational skills and refine writing skills through cultural and literary readings, discussions, and Multimedia Center assignments. Two exams; several compositions and rewrites.

Prerequisites: SP 151 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 153 INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE SPANISH

SP 153 is an six-credit, communication-based, intermediate-level Spanish language course that combines SP 151 and SP 152. Focus is on learning and review of vocabulary and grammatical structures, with emphasis on oral expression, listening comprehension, and on formal written skills. Also integrates skills related to cultural literacy. Students will revisit grammatical structures learned at the introductory level, and continue to develop meaningful and accurate communication skills. Class focuses on reading, writing, listening and oral practice with additional screening of films representative of Spanish and Spanish-American cultures for discussion. This intensive course is designed to advance communication skills (speaking, writing, reading, and listening) while working to build and expand vocabulary and cultural competence. Not open to students who have taken SP 151 or 152 already. Placement score determines eligibility.

Prerequisites: SP 102, SP 113, or placement
Last Offered: Summer 2017

SP 157 SPANISH IN...

Study Spanish conversation and culture abroad in a Spanish-Speaking country. (Ecuador, Mexico, or Spain) Program fee includes instruction at local language institute, family-stay and partial board, and excursions designed to complement the program’s special topic. Special application required.

Prerequisites: Minimum one year of college Spanish.
Last Offered: Summer 2016

SP 161 ADVANCED SPANISH GRAMMAR

An in-depth review of key aspects of Spanish grammar and syntax. Builds on students' previous knowledge of Spanish grammar to consider in more detail topics including the indicative and subjunctive moods, ser and estar, the infinitive, prepositions, and the use of gerunds, among other topics. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the material through a variety of practical written exercises. Not for major or minor credit.

Prerequisites: SP 152 or placement
Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 162 ADVANCED CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH

Targeted topics serve to develop oral communication skills, phonetic and linguistic accuracy, effective communication, and vocabulary building. Students expected to use Spanish exclusively and to apply grammatical concepts learned in previous study of the language. Open to students with intermediate knowledge of Spanish grammar and vocabulary. This course is NOT appropriate for Spanish speakers already fluent in the language. Not for major or minor credit.

Prerequisites: SP 152 or placement
Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 200 ADVANCED SPANISH COMPOSITION

This course is designed to refine the student's writing and reading skills in Spanish in preparation for entering upper-level Spanish courses. The class time and the assignments are divided between developing composition - writing skills, a variety of readings in Hispanic literature, and some review of grammatical structures. Two exams; four or five compositions and rewrites. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 152, SP 153, or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 202 THE FORGING OF A NATION: LITERARY IDEAS AND AESTHETICS FROM THE ROMANTICS TO DEMOCRATIC SPAIN

Explores the development of Spanish national identities reflected in and influenced by literary works from the early 19th century to the 21st. Symptomatic of transformations throughout Europe, Spain’s writers engage with a modernity that fitfully replaces the traditional social order. Their tools were the systems of knowing the world and of linguistic expression that would be forever changed by contradictions they saw around them. From the poetry of the Romantic period through the literature of the post-Franco era, literature in Spain is a register of cultural turmoil as well as desperate hope and expectation. Readings may include: Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, José de Espronceda, Benito Pérez Galdós, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Miguel de Unamuno, José Ortega y Gasset, Federico García Lorca, Jacinto Benavente, Ana María Matute, Carmen Martín Gaite, Antonio Buero Vallejo, Rosa Montero, Paloma Pedrero, Bernardo Atxaga, and Mercè Rodoreda.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 203 ORIGINS AND EMPIRE: READING THE EARLY HISPANIC WORLD

The course features early-modern Hispanic texts of Spain and Spanish America. It concentrates on the literature of the 16th and 17th centuries with works such as the Lazarillo de Tormes, the Novelas ejemplares of Cervantes and the poetry of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz . Several papers in Spanish required. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2017

SP 204 Coming to Terms: Spanish American Literature, from Tradition to Innovation

This course explores the multiple ways that intellectual debates in Spanish America have played out across literary texts from the 1800s to the twenty-first century. Independence from Spain, utopian societies, the value of European literary models, what it means to be modern, the rise of large cosmopolitan cities, autochthonous revolutions, dictatorship and post-dictatorship, the selling of the tropics, authenticity and subalternity, indigenous manifestoes, and experimental theater all respond to the burning questions put forth across Spanish America about its past, present, and future. How individual writers are inspired to respond will be our focus. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 205 SPAIN: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

This course explores selected topics from the early cultural life of the Iberian Peninsula to the burning issues of the 21st century. Topics vary from semester to semester but focus on changing notions of what it means to be “Spanish;” questions of cultural, religious, and ethnic inclusion and exclusion; the rise and fall of empire; Spain in America; war, peace, and reconciliation; terror at home; and Spain in the new Europe. Students will critique the myths, stereotypes, and realities of Spanish cultural identities as they examine representative examples of art, architecture, photography, music, sports, culinary arts, television, and film. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2017

SP 206 The Invention of Spanish America: From Colonial Subjects to Global Citizens

What was/is Spanish America? This course explores the processes of formation and transformation of the Spanish Americas from pre-Columbian and New World societies through the crucial issues of the globalized Americas today and tomorrow. Topics vary from semester to semester but focus on issues of language, ideology, national identity, race, class, gender, ethnicity, myths, customs and institutions as students examine the material products of folklore, music, the arts, architecture, film, popular culture. Questions of migration, diaspora, cultural hybridity, and modernity are addressed through texts and visual media. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2016

SP 207 SPANISH IN SUMMER STUDY ABROAD

Study Spanish conversation and culture abroad in a Spanish-Speaking country.(Ecuador, Mexico, or Spain) Program fee includes instruction at local language institute, family-stay and partial board, and excursions designed to complement the program’s special topic. Special application required.

Prerequisites: Minimum one year of college Spanish.
Last Offered: Summer 2016

SP 211 CENSORSHIP

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

SP 215 "DON QUIXOTE": THE BOOK, THE MYTH, THE IMAGE

This course entails a close reading of the novel in Engllish trtanslation, coupled with a focus on the ways in which both the novel and/or protagonist have been adapted, adopted, interpreted or incorporated by various cittical and popular traditions both inside and outside of Spain from the time of its original publication in 1605 through the 21st century. We will examine several filmic adaptations, illuatrations and paintings as well, withan eye toward critically examining the problemaatic employment of Don Quixote as an icon of Pan-Hispanic culture. However, we will continually return to the novel as our anchor throughout the course, while assessing the constantly changing ways in which comtemporary readers and scholars appoach the text. Course is taught in English. *Students taking the course for Spanish credit will do the bulk of the work in Spanish

Prerequisites: SP 200, if taken as SP 215. No pre-req for CLT, ENG, or LTS cross lists.
Last Offered: Fall 2016

SP 216 THE PICARESQUE NOVEL

Conducted in English, with readings in the original language or in English, the course investigates the Lazarillo de Tormes, Mateo Aleman’s Guz-man de Alfarache, Quevedo’s Buscon, Grim-mel---shausen’s Simplizissimus, Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Smolett’s Roderick Random, Le Sage’s Gil Blas, and Thomas Mann’s Felix Krull in an attempt to determine whether there is a picaresque genre and to explore the dialectic between morality and criminality in the growth of the early European novel.

SP 217 EL QUIJOTE

A close reading of both parts of the novel, with special attention to how the Spanish work anticipates and prepares the major modes of expression of later Western prose fiction. Each student will be asked to interpret a major 18th, 19th, or 20th-century fiction on the basis of Cervantes's book. Classroom presentations, written assignments, and exams. Class taught in Spanish.

SP 218 SAINTS, SINNERS & SOVEREIGNS IN MEDIEVAL & EARLY MODERN SPAIN

This course will study various literary, artistic, and historical representations in order to better understand how the discourses of religious and secular life shaped identity, politics, and cultural production in medieval and early modern Spain. We will explore the writing of those who would become saints (e.g. Teresa de Ávila and Juan de la Cruz) as well as texts that examine either the morality or amorality of the time period through characters like go-betweens or pícaros. We will also investigate how various kings and queens (including The Catholic Monarchs, Carlos V, and Felipe II) are represented in portraits and how writers incorporated fictionalized versions of monarchs in their texts. Some themes which will help guide our discussion will include: gender, the saintly body, crime and punishment, the Spanish Inquisition, religious difference, and the burgeoning empire. A few short papers and/or exams, a longer research paper and a presentation will be the basis for evaluation. In Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 220 GOLDEN AGE DRAMA

A study of the theatrical masterpieces of Lope, Tirso, and Calderon, which rank wiht the greatest Western drama, with particular attention to their comedic uniqueness. Class taught in Spanish.

SP 231 THE GENERATION OF 1898 & MODERNISMO

In both Spain and Latin America the closing years of the nineteenth century and the dawning of the twentieth demanded critical revisions in the areas of politics and aesthetics. Intellectuals--writers, artists, and musicians alike--confronted the "ruins" of the past, seeking in their place new expressions of sublime beauty, liberty, spirituality and sensuality. Revision or destruction? Tradition or innovation? Nationalism or "Enlightenment"? Woman as angel or demon, muse or serpent? From Nicaraguan Ruben Dario to Cuban Jose Marti, and in Spain, from Valle-Inclan to Unamuno, this course explores the creation of the 'fin de siglo' subjectivity in its multiple forms during the "decadent" transition from the "old" to the "new." 2-3 short papers; exam. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200

SP 245 TWENTIETH & TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY SPANISH THEATER

Explores trends in Spanish theater from the early twentieth century (Valle - Inclan, Garcia Lorca, Benavente) through post-Civil War censorship and 'posibilismo' to 21st century productions. Plays by Casona, Buero, Sastre, Arrabal, and Ruibal to the most recent innovators (Ana Diosdado, Antonio Gala, Francisco Nieva, Paloma Pedrero, etc. are included). We will also consider cinematic versions of plays to compare technique and forms of representation. Several papers. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2010

SP 249 Topics in Spanish Literature and Culture

Topics vary and may include the Spanish sonnet and romance, Cervantes’ novelas ejemplares, the arts and the Spanish Civil War, and other considerations of the relations between literature and other disciplines (the visual arts, philosophy, history, music, etc.). Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200

SP 249A STORIES FROM SPAIN

This course examines a variety of realist novels, psychological thrillers, erotic tales, heroic narratives, and coming-of-age tales from XIX , XX and XXI century Spain. In discussions we will look at social changes --the Spanish Civil War, the death of Franco, the Constitution of 1978, women’s rights movements--autonomous regional politics , the destape, the Movida, and Spain in the New Europe-through the literary reflections of social issues, aesthetics, and political debates. Course taught in Spanish. All written work in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200

SP 249B STAGES OF RESISTANCE

Description: This course studies the role of Spanish theater as a vehicle for the examination and critique of Spanish society in different stages of its history. Although the main focus of the class will be dramatic texts(la comedia, el auto sacramental, el entremes) from Spains Golden Age, we will also examine representative examples of contemporary Spanish theater. We will discuss the role of the dramatic stage as a space for continually questioning and commenting on, among others, the construction of gender roles, politics, religion, sexuality and Spanish national identity. Some of the themes examined will be cross-dressing, the connection between "Church" and "State", censorship (by the Inquisition and the Franco regime) and theater post-Franco. Students will be exposed to basic theory on performance and to theatrical terminology. Authors will include: Felix Lope de Vega, Pedro Calderon de la Barca, Federico Garcia Lorca and Paloma Pedrero. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2013

SP 249D BUNUEL, DALI, LORCA

This course explores Surrealism and Spain, from the 1920s on, embedding cutting-edge works in broader questions of identity and possible threats to an emerging nation in a continent, a world, and an ethos caught between tradition and modernity. Includes films, art, essays, plays, poetry. Course taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2016

SP 249E READING FABLES & TELLING TALES IN EARLY MODERN SPAIN

This course will examine the rich tradition of short stories and fábulas in Spain, beginning in medieval times and ending in the eighteenth century. We will examine the different ways in which a story can be presented as well as the purposes (didactic, entertainment, etc.) behind a variety of shorter works produced. Some of the themes that will be addressed are: exemplarity, love, social class, marriage, revenge, gender and miracles. We will also consider the shift from an oral culture to a written one and the implications of the invention of the printing press and rising literacy rates on the short story as a genre and reading as a pastime. Special emphasis will be placed on the Novelas ejemplares by Miguel de Cervantes and the Desengaños amorosos by María de Zayas. Other authors include the Arcipreste de Hita, Don Juan Manuel and Tomás de Iriarte. In Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2016

SP 249F The Spanish Inquisition: Heresy, Control, and Empire

This course explores the effects and the literary/artistic representations of inquisitorial practices and policies in the Hispanic world. The focus will be on the implementation of the Spanish Inquisition during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will examine both primary and secondary sources in order to understand the functions of the institution and its role in the consolidation of imperial power and the shaping of Hispanic cultures. Taught in English.

SP 249G PRINCESAS, PRISIONERAS

No description

SP 249M Out of the Wings: Contemporary Spain on Stage

Dramatic and decisive political, social, and cultural changes in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century have been reflected in onstage experimentation and innovation by a variety of new Spanish playwrights. Tensions between progress, democracy, and modernity against the pull of the past are explored as Spain reconnects with Europe in a second transition into the new century. This course puts the theater of the absurd, the theater of the grotesque, and contemporary cutting-edge aesthetics in the limelight as well as the extraordinary flourishing of women dramatists over the past twenty years. Playwrights include José Ruibal, Fernando Arrabal, Carmen Resino, Juan Mayorga, José Luis Alonso de Santos, Jaime Salom, Paloma Pedrero, Sergi Belbel and the Catalan theater of pain, Ana Diosdado, Laila Ripoll, Concha Romero, and Itziar Pascual. Course taught in Spanish. Students will practice segments of plays in class, and stage a one-act play at the end of the semester.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2016

SP 255 1492 AND BEYOND

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 256 CONTEMPORARY SPANISH-AMERICAN PROSE

Spanish-American fiction attained a new level of international recognition and a greatly expanded readership with the emergence of the “new narrative” and the so-called “Boom” of the 1960s. This course covers modern classics by authors such as Maria Luisa Bombal, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes, Luisa Valenzuela and Manuel Puig, as well as newer writers. Our study explores the works within their literary, cultural and social contexts. Several brief textual commentaries, two essays, two exams. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2013

SP 257 SPANISH AMERICAN THEATRE AND POETRY

Spanish America has long been home to internationally renowned poets, while theater has seemed to languish in the background. This course juxtaposes the often private, hermetic language of poetry with the public genre of theater to discover aesthetic and ideological connections and disparities. Readings chosen from the major works of Alfonsina Storni, Roberto Arlt, Pablo Neruda, César Vallejo, Jorge Díaz, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Octavio Paz, Sabina Berman and others. Several brief textual commentaries, two essays, two exams. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2012

SP 259 HISPANIC WOMEN & GLOBALIZATION

Radical social and economic changes occurring in the twenty-first century reinforce the need for better cultural and historical perspectives on women's roles and activities in Latin America. This course examines Latin American women intellectuals, activists, and feminists in the context of ‘Third World’ perspectives. The roles of women in ‘Third World’ countries have been affected greatly by drastic social, economic, and cultural changes over the past decades. How do they see themselves? What role does immigration play in their lives? We examine the ideas of intellectuals, politicians, and the popular classes in Latin America regarding their own societies and the U.S. Includes photographic, cinematic, and written texts. Individual and group research projects. Issues of sexuality, education, the family, work, and culture will be considered in readings, films, and videos, art and music, and in conversations with guest speakers. Two to three papers. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 259 only

SP 260 (RE)WRITING GENDER IN SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE

This course examines the ways in which 20th-C Spanish-American literature constructs femininity, masculinity and sexuality in dialogue with societal norms. We will study works that reflect normative concepts of gender, and others that critique them, offer alternative constructions, or accomplish all three moves. Authors may include: Teresa de la Parra, María Luisa Bombal, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, Rosario Castellanos, Rosario Ferré, Reinaldo Arenas, Sylvia Molloy, Luis Zapata. Short essays, two one-hour exams. Course taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2016

SP 261 FACING FACTS: NON-FICTION WRITING

The 20th century's major periods of social and political upheaval in Spanish America are well documented by written and visual texts that claim to tell the truth about historical events. Many of these texts acquire the status of "literature" and not mere "reporting." This course examines the conventions of the literatures of fact, the expectations that readers bring to documentary writing, the blurring of the lines between factual and fictional discourses. Autobiography, “testimonio,” chronicle, documentary poetry and documentary film represent revolutionary Mexico, labor struggles of the 1920s, revolutionary Cuba, the repression in the Southern Cone, the Central American insurgencies, and the survival of indigenous cultures. Short essays; research term paper. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 261 only
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 262 TOPICS IN SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE

Marked by exotic landscapes, swans, and princesses, the literature of Modernismo was both escapist and engaged in a critique of the materialism and vulgarity of everyday life. The first Spanish-American literary movement to influence Spain’s cultural production, Modernismo is often associated with José Martí (Cuba) and Rubén Darío (Nicaragua) but it was a continent-wide phenomenon. This course will study Spanish-American Modernismo as a powerful site of cultural innovation and intervention that offers a critical approach to the phenomena of Modernity and the shaping of cultural identities. Through an analysis of representative works of fiction, essay, chronicle and poetry, we will examine the artistic and political implications of the movement, and we will discuss how Modernismo continues to inform contemporary cultural debates as well as notions of identity in the 21st century, as seen in street performances and graffiti. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 262B CUBA AT A CROSSROADS

An enduring experiment in socialism, Cuba has long been part of global debate and expectation, both on the island and among Cuban diasporic communities. Academic inquiry has ranged from Havana as an architectural monument, to leadership after the Castro brothers, from the Buena Vista Social Club to tourism and international hotel chains like Melià. This course examines historical framework, cultural mestizaje (influences of Europe, Latin America, and Africa), arts, and film to elicit conversations about the strategic island. Readings include José Martí, Cristina García, Fernández Retamar, Oscar Hijuelos, Senel Paz, Nicolás Guillén, Alejo Carpentier, Lezama Lima, Reinaldo Arenas, Cabrera Infante, Nancy Morejón. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2015

SP 262C DISABLING DISCOURSE: DISABILITY IN SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE

Disabled characters and metaphors that exploit the meanings associated with disability have been pervasive in story telling in many cultures since ancient times, and they remain a constant of literature, film, television, and other forms of narrative up to the present. This course studies the representation of characters with disabilities in Spanish-American literature from a variety of critical perspectives developed by disability studies scholars in the Global North and the Global South. Reading response papers, short essays, in-class presentation, one exam. Course taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 262D CULTURE & LITERATURE OF THE CARIBBEAN

This course focuses on the Spanish-speaking Caribbean within the larger cultural, historical, and political context of the Caribbean Basin. The course examines indigenous, European, and African influences on the molding of national cultures and identities as found in literary, cultural, and theoretical texts. Readings include examples from modern and contemporary Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Yucatan. Writings of Nicolas Guillen, Eugenio Maria de Hostos, Jose Marti, Roberto Fernandez Retamar, Ana Lydia Vega, and writers and artists of the Caribbean diaspora. Class taught in Spanish.

SP 262F IDENTITY SIGNS: SPANISH-AMERICAN COMING OF AGE STORIES

This course examines 20th-Century Spanish-American literary texts that represent the young person’s search for identity, self-knowledge and a place in an often hostile society. Factors such as nationality, social class, gender, race, ethnicity, disability and sexual orientation make this a dynamic process that is fraught with tensions and contradictions. Authors may include: Teresa de la Parra, María Luisa Bombal, José María Arguedas, Mario Vargas Llosa, Rosario Ferré, Isabel Allende, Elena Poniatowska, Reinaldo Arenas. Short essays, research term paper. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2015

SP 262G COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE

This course surveys the major texts in Latin America's colonial period, including the writing of Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, Bartolomé de las Casas, El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Álvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. We will explore the literary and historical aspects of these texts and consider, among other, the themes of empire, gender, race, and class. Class taught in English but may be taken for Spanish credit.

Prerequisites: if registering for SP section: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2014

SP 266 BRAZILIAN LIT AND CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

SP 270 THE HISPANIC SHORT STORY

This course examines the particular aesthetic and formal challenges of the short story genre in texts from Spain and Latin America. From “realism” to science fiction, and from the humorous to the grotesque, we will explore the narrative possibilities of a variety of short texts. Authors include ‘Clarin; Quiroga, Tusquets, Cortazar, Borges, Chacel, Moix, and others. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 271 POWER OF POPULAR CULTURE

No description

SP 272 POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN: VISITORS, OBSERVERS, AND IMAGINARY GEOGRAPHIES

This course examines the intersection of written text and visual image—like the flip sides of a postcard—as mediated exchanges between visitor and addressee, as dramatized encounters, and as treasured material objects. We study a variety of prose writings, essays, photographs, and films related to geographical places in Spain as seen by insiders and outsiders. Methods and media of communication, cultural interaction and correspondence, undeliverable messages, and reading visual clues are some of the theoretical concerns we explore. Taught in Spanish. Students will create digital postcards as part of their semester’s projects. We will visit (digitally): Santiago de Compostela and the Camino de Santiago, Guernica, Barcelona, Madrid, Sevilla, and Granada.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2015

SP 275 MARX AND FREUD IN LATIN AMERICA

This course examines the ongoing influence of writings by Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud on Latin American intellectuals and societies. Key theoretical frameworks—class, inequality, power, social agency, psychoanalysis and subjectivity—have elicited a variety of responses anchored in specific Latin American cultural and historical circumstances. We explore creative practices and cultural products from such encounters, ranging from short stories to novels, from plays to films, and from murals and public art to popular genres. We begin by reading foundational texts by Marx and Freud, then documents revealing how Latin America captured their imagination. Course is taught in Spanish. Most readings in Spanish, some in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 277 MEXICO, DF: GLOBAL METRO

Called by some “the capital of the 221st century,” Greater Mexico City is inhabited by close to 20 million people. The Distrito Federal (DF) and capital of Mexico is today the largest metroopolitan area in the western hemisphere and third largest city in the world by population. Established by the Spanish in 1524 on the ruins of the Aztec city Tenochtitlán they had destroyed, Mexico City is a global center of finance, culture, and industry. This course examines the development of this vibrant megalopolis over the 20th and 21st centuries using literature, film, politics, tourism, music and the arts, cultural geography, architectural space, and essays by urban wanderers to try and get a handle on a space that seems to contradict itself at every turn.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

SP 280 THE TRANSHISPANIC SUPERNATURAL: GHOSTS, WITCHES, AND VAMPIRES IN FILM AND LITERATURE FROM SPAIN AND SPANISH AMERICA

A long tradition of supernatural interventions in everyday life has been portrayed in a wide variety of images in Hispanic cultures from Spain to the Americas, and from colonial times to the 21st century. This course explores the folkloric, the Gothic, and the neo-Gothic traditions as assimilated and portrayed in the media, in literature, and in the cinema as well as hybrid genres such as vampire comedies, haunted schools and children, and the political supernatural. We will explore theories of recycling and reinterpreting the supernatural to study how societies of the Spanish-speaking world have portrayed interactions between the natural world and elements of the supernatural, how they are reimagined, whether explanations are possible or ambiguities resist explanation, and the politics of the supernatural. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 281 OTHER WORLDS & UNDERWORLDS

This course focuses on opposing narrative forces: the fantasy of an ideal society and the underground terrain of mystery and crime. It is articulated around literary and cinematic visions of our own world, and of alternative worlds imagined as either utopias or, conversely, as frightening and undesirable dystopias. The authors’ and directors’ speculative futures may encompass real-world issues or take on entirely fictional characteristics. On the one hand, dehumanization, violence, environmental disaster, poverty, and fear may abound; on the other, science and technology, religion, libertarian socialism, or even androgyny may be optimistically embraced as hopes for humanity. Readings on both theory and practice of these genres include varieties of popular detective fiction from Spain and Spanish America. Also included are fantasy and science fiction novels, and film noir. Films, readings, and course in Spanish.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

SP 282 US LATINOS/LATINAS

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a writing and culture in its rich geographic and ethnic diversity; Latinization of the American landscape; exile, immigration, cultural syncretism.

SP 285 BUNUEL & CO.

No description

SP 287 LATIN-AMERICAN FILM

This course explores the repackaging of Hollywood genres and conventions by the directors of Latin American cinema. The genres we study will include: melodrama, thriller, film noir, comedy, and literary adaptations, with films from Chile, Cuba, Colombia, Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina. Although we will screen a few classics of the golden age (1950s) for comparison, emphasis will be on films of the last twenty years. Course taught in English but written work may be done in Spanish for Spanish credit.

Prerequisites: SP 200, if taken for Spanish credit
Last Offered: Fall 2016

SP 287A MEXICAN FILM

This course explores both historical antecedents and contemporary visions. It includes films by directors such as Spanish exile Luis Bunuel, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Jaime Humberto Hermosillo, Alfonso Cuaron, Carlos Reygadas, Raul Ruiz, Maria Novaro, and other box office favorites. From Robert Rodriguez's Bedhead, to Desperado, Once Upon a Time in Mexico and, of course, Y tu mama tambien, Entre Pancho Villa y una mujer desnuda, and La ley de Herodes we explore images of Mexican culture. Course taught in English but work may be written in Spanish for Spanish credit.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

SP 288 SPANISH FILM

Devoted to the critical analysis of recent Spanish cinema within its cultural contexts. Beginning with the early post–Civil War period, the focus is on film as the narrative representation of radical changes and transitions in Spanish society. Considers the translation of other media (literary, theatrical, etc.) into film and the problematic relationship between historical “reality” and the aesthetics of cinematic representation. Emphasis on films from the democratic transition to today. Includes films by directors such as Buñuel, Erice, Saura, Trueba, Garcia Sanchez, Almodovar, de la Iglesia, Amenabar. Class taught in English. Written work in Spanish for Spanish credit.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

SP 289 WOMEN IN HISPANIC FILM

Examine images of women in a variety of films from Latin America and Spain. Topics range from the use of "the feminine" in war propaganda, to films of the Franco dictatorship, and from Latin American political documentaries to popular commercial films. Emphasis on cinematic representation as visual ideology, and on films at the millennium. Class taught in English. Written work in Spanish for SP credit.

SP 290 BARCELONA&MEDITTERAN CLTR

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SP 292 PHOTO IN SP & SP AMERICA

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

SP 294E READING FABLES TELLING TALES

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SP 390 SUPERVISED TEACHING

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 392 PRACTICUM

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 393 SENIOR PROJECT

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 393W SENIOR PROJECT

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 394 INTERNSHIP

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 405 SPAIN PAST PRESENT FUTURE

This course explores the history of social and cultural development of modern Spain into the 21st century through a variety of media such as art, literature, and film.Topics range from the early cultural life of the peninsula to the implications of the Reconquista and from Spain's overseas empire to the Spanish Civil War, some emphasis on contemporary issues. Class taught in Spanish. Several papers, midterm exam. All written work in Spanish.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

SP 406 INVENTION SP AMERICA

This course explores the ideas and events shaping the culture(s) of Spanish America, from pre-Columbian times to the present, with an emphasis on the concepts of discovery, conquest, mestizaje, and the formation of national cultural identity. Strong consideration will be given to contemporary issues. Texts will be drawn from literature, sociology, anthropology, history, the arts, and film. Several short essays, two exams. Class taught in Spanish.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

SP 417 EL QUIJOTE

A close reading of both parts of the novel, with special attention to how the Spanish work anticipates and prepares the major modes of expression of later Western prose fiction. Each student will be asked to interpret a major 18th, 19th, or 20th-century fiction on the basis of Cervantes's book. Classroom presentations, written assignments, and exams. Class taught in Spanish.

SP 418 SAINTS, SINNERS & SOVEREIGNS

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 420 GOLDEN AGE DRAMA

A study of the theatrical masterpieces of Lope, Tirso, and Calderon, which rank wiht the greatest Western drama, with particular attention to their comedic uniqueness. Class taught in Spanish.

SP 431 THE GENERATION OF 1898 AND MODERNISMO

In both Spain and Latin America the closing years of the nineteenth century and the dawning of the twentieth demanded critical revisions in the areas of politics and aesthetics. Intellectuals--writers, artists, and musicians alike--confronted the "ruins" of the past, seeking in their place new expressions of sublime beauty, liberty, spirituality and sensuality. Revision or destruction? Tradition or innovation? Nationalism or "Enlightenment"? Woman as angel or demon, muse or serpent? From Nicaraguan Ruben Dario to Cuban Jose Marti, and in Spain, from Valle-Inclan to Unamuno, this course explores the creation of the 'fin de siglo' subjectivity in its multiple forms during the "decadent" transition from the "old" to the "new." 2-3 short papers; exam. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200

SP 449 TOPICS IN SPANISH LIT&CULTR

Topics vary and may include the Spanish sonnet and romance, Cervantes’ novelas ejemplares, the arts and the Spanish Civil War, and other considerations of the relations between literature and other disciplines (the visual arts, philosophy, history, music, etc.). Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200

SP 449A STORIES FROM SPAIN

This course examines a variety of realist novels, psychological thrillers, erotic tales, heroic narratives, and coming-of-age tales from XIX , XX and XXI century Spain. In discussions we will look at social changes --the Spanish Civil War, the death of Franco, the Constitution of 1978, women’s rights movements--autonomous regional politics , the destape, the Movida, and Spain in the New Europe-through the literary reflections of social issues, aesthetics, and political debates. Course taught in Spanish. All written work in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200

SP 449B STAGES OF RESISTANCE

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

SP 449D BUNUEL, DALI, LORCA

In the decades preceding the Civil War, Spanish avant gardes are represented by three larger-than-life figures: exiled film director Luis Buñuel, obsessed with the feminine, with his homeland and its supposedly eternal myths; Federico García Lorca, poet and playwright of Andalucía and its mythified past, assassinated on the eve of the conflict; and Salvador Dalí who lives the tenets of both Surrealism and capitalism in the flesh. Each leaves a legacy that extends beyond the borders of Spain and beyond the end of the twentieth century. This course explores Surrealism and Spain, from the 1920s on, embedding cutting-edge works in broader questions of identity and possible threats to an emerging nation in a continent, a world, and an ethos caught between tradition and modernity. Includes films, art, essays, plays, poetry. Course taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Spring 2016

SP 449E READING FABLES TELLING TALES

This course will examine the rich tradition of short stories and fábulas in Spain, beginning in medieval times and ending in the eighteenth century. We will examine the different ways in which a story can be presented as well as the purposes (didactic, entertainment, etc.) behind a variety of shorter works produced. Some of the themes that will be addressed are: exemplarity, love, social class, marriage, revenge, gender and miracles. We will also consider the shift from an oral culture to a written one and the implications of the invention of the printing press and rising literacy rates on the short story as a genre and reading as a pastime. Special emphasis will be placed on the Novelas ejemplares by Miguel de Cervantes and the Desengaños amorosos by María de Zayas. Other authors include the Arcipreste de Hita, Don Juan Manuel and Tomás de Iriarte. In Spanish.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

SP 449G PRINCESAS, PRISIONERAS

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SP 456 CONTEMP SPAN-AMER PROSE

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Last Offered: Fall 2013

SP 457 SP AM THE AND POETRY

Spanish America has long been home to internationally renowned poets, while theater has seemed to languish in the background. This course juxtaposes the often private, hermetic language of poetry with the public genre of theater to discover aesthetic and ideological connections and disparities. Readings chosen from the major works of Alfonsina Storni, Roberto Arlt, Pablo Neruda, César Vallejo, Jorge Díaz, Luis Rafael Sánchez, Octavio Paz, Sabina Berman and others. Several brief textual commentaries, two essays, two exams. Class taught in Spanish.

Last Offered: Spring 2012

SP 459 HISPANIC WOMEN&GLOBALIZATION

Radical social and economic changes occurring in the twenty-first century reinforce the need for better cultural and historical perspectives on women's roles and activities in Latin America. This course examines Latin American women intellectuals, activists, and feminists in the context of ‘Third World’ perspectives. The roles of women in ‘Third World’ countries have been affected greatly by drastic social, economic, and cultural changes over the past decades. How do they see themselves? What role does immigration play in their lives? We examine the ideas of intellectuals, politicians, and the popular classes in Latin America regarding their own societies and the U.S. Includes photographic, cinematic, and written texts. Individual and group research projects. Issues of sexuality, education, the family, work, and culture will be considered in readings, films, and videos, art and music, and in conversations with guest speakers. Two to three papers. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 259 only

SP 460 SPANISH AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS

Through study of texts (mostly novels) written by women from Latin America, we will ask broad questions concerning cultural contexts with respect to sexuality and gender, language, aesthetics, psychology, and social issues. The course will use materials from a variety of fields (literary and cultural theory, history, sociology, anthropology, feminist studies) in addition to the primary texts. Emphasis on collaborative research and progressive writing assignments. Campus visit by one of the authors planned. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 260 only
Last Offered: Fall 2016

SP 461 FACING FACTS:NON-FICTN WRTNG

This century's major periods of social and political upheaval in Spanish America are well documented by a variety of texts that claim to tell the truth about historical events. Many of these texts acquire the status of "literature" and not mere "reporting." This course will ask the following questions: How have Spanish American writers constructed factual, truth-telling texts? What impact has photography had on the writing of nonfiction? What expectations do we as readers bring to documentary literature? How are the lines drawn -- and blurred -- between factual and fictional discourses? Readings will be chosen to represent revolutionary Mexico, labor struggles of the 1920s, revolutionary Cuba, the repression in the Southern Cone, the Central American insurgencies, and the survival of indigenous cultures. Short essays; research term paper. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 261 only
Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 462 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN LIT

Topics vary from semester to semester. Possible topics include the confessional mode in Hispanic literature, surrealism and the avant-garde in art and Hispanic literature, Mexican literature, and other areas of interdisciplinary study. Class taught in Spanish.

Prerequisites: SP 200
Last Offered: Fall 2014

SP 462B CUBA AT A CROSSROADS

Now that the twenty-first century has arrived, we cannot help but picture a Cuba “without Fidel.” But what does that mean? How do those in Cuba imagine their nation down the road? How does the Cuban community in Miami represent its hopes and dreams? This course examines art, film, and literary texts from the “homeland” and from the diaspora to compare and contrast images that negotiate between the past and the future. Course taught in English. Readings may be done in English or Spanish (for SP credit).

Last Offered: Fall 2015

SP 462C DISABLING DISCOURSE: DISABILITY IN SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 462D CULTURE&LIT OF THE CARIBBEAN

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SP 462F IDENTITY SIGNS

This course will examine a variety of 20th-Century Spanish-American literary texts that represent the young person’s search for identity, self-knowledge and a place inn an often hostile society. Factors such as nationality, social class, gender, race, ethnicity and sexual orientation make this a dynamic process that is fraught with tensions and contradictions. Authors may include: Marîa Luisa Bombal, José Maria Arguedas, Mario Vargas Llosa, Rosario Ferré, Nelson Estupinan Bass, José Augustîn, Isabel Allende, Elena Poniatowska and Rosamarîa Roffiel. This course will be taught in Spanish.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

SP 466 BRAZILIAN LIT AND CULTURE

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

SP 470 HISPANIC SHORT STORY

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 471 POWER OF POPULAR CULTURE

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SP 472 POSTCARDS FROM SPAIN

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

SP 475 MARX AND FREUD

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 477 MEXICO, DF: GLOBAL METRO

Called by some “the capital of the 221st century,” Greater Mexico City is inhabited by close to 20 million people. The Distrito Federal (DF) and capital of Mexico is today the largest metroopolitan area in the western hemisphere and third largest city in the world by population. Established by the Spanish in 1524 on the ruins of the Aztec city Tenochtitlán they had destroyed, Mexico City is a global center of finance, culture, and industry. This course examines the development of this vibrant megalopolis over the 20th and 21st centuries using literature, film, politics, tourism, music and the arts, cultural geography, architectural space, and essays by urban wanderers to try and get a handle on a space that seems to contradict itself at every turn.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

SP 480 TRANSHISANIC SUPERNATURAL

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Last Offered: Spring 2018

SP 481 OTHER WORLDS & UNDERWORLDS

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

SP 482 US LATINOS/LATINAS

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a writing and culture in its rich geographic and ethnic diversity; Latinization of the American landscape; exile, immigration, cultural syncretism.

SP 485 BUNUEL & CO.

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SP 487 LATIN-AMERICAN FILM

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

SP 487A MEXICAN FILM

Visitors to Mexico already have Hollywood versions of the country in their heads, but the 'real' Mexico is a much more complex place. Archetypes of tough hombres, renegade outlaws, dark and sultry women, or beach bums lolling under the hot sun fall by the wayside when Mexican cinema introduces the grittier and much more varied realities of the contemporary nation. This course explores both historical antecedents and contemporary visions. It includes films by directors such as Spanish exile Luis Bunuel, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Jaime Humberto Hermosillo, Alfonso Cuaron, Carlos Reygadas, Raul Ruiz, Maria Novaro, and other box office favorites. From Robert Rodriguez's Bedhead, to Desperado, Once Upon a Time in Mexico and, of course, Y tu mama tambien, Entre Pancho Villa y una mujer desnuda, and La ley de Herodes we explore images of Mexican culture. Course taught in English but work may be written in Spanish for Spanish credit.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 287A only
Last Offered: Spring 2014

SP 488 SPANISH FILM

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

SP 489 WOMEN IN HISPANIC FILM

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SP 491 MASTER'S READNG COURSE IN SP

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 492 PHOTO IN SP & SP AMERICA

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

SP 495 MASTER'S RESEARCH IN SP

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 591 PHD READINGS

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 890 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE - MA

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Last Offered: Summer 2011

SP 895 CONT OF MASTER'S ENROLLMENT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 899 MASTER'S DISSERTATION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 985 LEAVE OF ABSENCE

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

SP 990 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE

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Last Offered: Summer 2011