News & Events

Recent News

 

Newscenter: John Givens Named Professor of the Year in the Humanities

May 16, 2017

John Givens, associate professor of Russian and chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, won the Students’ Association Government’s Professor of the Year in the Humanities field. He received his doctoral degree from the University of Washington in 1993 and joined the Rochester faculty the same year. The Baker City, Oregon native focuses on Russian literature and cinema and recently completed a book titled The Image of Christ in Russian Literature.

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Four MLC Majors Win Fulbright Grants

April 18, 2017


Two French majors, two German majors, and one Spanish minor are among the twelve University of Rochester students and recent alumni who have been offered 2017–18 grants in the prestigious Fulbright US Student Grant program, allowing them to pursue advanced studies, conduct research, and teach English language and U.S. culture abroad. Rochester's candidate pool consisted of 40 applicants, 19 of whom became semifinalists. The Fulbright US program awards approximately 900 grants for research and study, and 1,200 English teaching assistantship grants each year. Applicants are nominated by their college or university's Fulbright evaluation committee, which may also endorse alumni candidates.

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Faculty in the News: Joanne Bernardi on WXXI's Connections

December 8, 2016

Joanne BernardiYesterday, Joanne Bernardi, associate professor of Japanese in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, appeared on WXXI's Connections with Evan Dawson to discuss the on-campus photography exhibit, "Internment: The Japanese-American Experience in World War II," as well as recent calls to establish a Muslim registry modeled on the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. Mr. Dawson and Professor Bernardi were also joined by Margaret Miyake and Notch Miyake (whose photographs and text, respectively, are featured in the exhibit) and Ken Warner (a descendent of an American who was interned).

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Faculty in the News: "UR Exhibit Shows Lessons of Japanese-American Internment Camps"

December 7, 2016


"The exhibit ['Internment: The Japanese-American Experience in World War II'] was organized by Joanne Bernardi, associate professor of Japanese and film and media studies.... Included in the exhibit are postcards and button pins from World War II that are part of Bernardi's collection, such as the ones using words and phrases that are examples of the insensitive mindset of the time.... Bernardi was prompted to put together such an exhibit a year ago after hearing the then-mayor of Roanoke, Virginia, David Bowers, cite the use of internment camps for Japanese-Americans during World War II to justify suspending the relocation of Syrian refugees in his city. 'I was shocked because he didn't know his history of internment and what it signified. It was a knee-jerk reaction to an atmosphere of fear, xenophobia and racism, prompted by Pearl Harbor,' said Bernardi."

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Newscenter: Spanish Major Angela Remus '16 Reaches Final Round for Rhodes Scholarship

November 18, 2016

Angela RemusAngela Remus ’16, who graduated with a bachelor of arts with majors in international relations and Spanish, will interview this weekend in Chicago in the final selection round for the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship. A Renaissance & Global Scholar who graduated summa cum laude, Remus was elected to Phi Beta Kappa as a junior. She studied abroad in Spain and Malawi and currently is an immigration worker with the International Rescue Committee in Abilene, Texas. Her career interests involve research and policy regarding refugees and asylum seekers, and she hopes to pursue two master’s degrees at Oxford: refugee and forced migration studies followed by Latin American studies. The Des Plaines, Illinois native hopes to be among the 32 American candidates chosen for the international postgraduate award. Rhodes Scholarships provide all expenses for two or three years of study at the University of Oxford in England.

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Faculty Publication: Robert Doran's "The Ethics of Theory"

November 17, 2016

Bloomsbury has just published The Ethics of Theory: Philosophy, History, Literature, the newest volume by Robert Doran, associate professor of French and comparative literature in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures!

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Newscenter: "Events Pay Homage to Cervantes on 400th Anniversary of His Death"

November 10, 2016


In honor of the 400th anniversary of Cervantes's death, students and librarians are hosting an exhibit and a presentation examining how Cervantes and Don Quixote have inspired interpretations and representations across the centuries. The exhibit, "Beyond Windmills: Commemorating Cervantes, Representing Don Quixote," features images from the library's rare book holdings. The exhibit will be on view November 2 through December 11 in Rare Books, Special Collections and Preservation at Rush Rhees Library. Students in the course "Don Quixote: The Book, the Myth, the Image"—taught by associate professor of Spanish Ryan Prendergast—will make presentations alongside faculty about the images and the influence of Don Quixote. The event will be held in the Humanities Center, on the second floor of Rush Rhees Library, on November 16 at 10:25 a.m.

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Now Accepting Application for the Lynne R. Miller Study Abroad Scholarship!

November 1, 2016

Miller Scholarship 2017 Flier
The Spanish Program is now accepting applications for the Lynne R. Miller Study Abroad Scholarship for study in a Spanish-speaking country during Summer 2017 or Academic Year 2017–2018.

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Newscenter: "Looking Like the Enemy" Examines WWII Internment, Current Debates

October 19, 2016

"Looking Like the Enemy: The WWII Japanese American Experience," is a Humanities Project exhibit and lecture organized by Joanne Bernardi, associate professor of Japanese, which will examine the experiences of interned Japanese-Americans – and the relevance of their experiences to current debates about terrorism, the refugee crisis, and illegal immigration.

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Newscenter: Beth Jörgensen Receives Goergen Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

October 3, 2016


Beth Jörgensen, professor of Spanish in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures
, is among the 2016 recipients of the Goergen Awards for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching! Professor Jörgensen has taught Spanish at Rochester for 30 years and in 2011 was named a professor in MLC. The Goergen Awards recognize the distinctive teaching accomplishments of faculty in Arts, Science, and Engineering. They were established in 1997 and are named for and sponsored by University Trustee and Board Chairman Emeritus Robert Goergen ’60 and his wife, Pamela. Professor Jörgensen and the other recipients will 
be honored Wednesday, October 5, in a 4 p.m. ceremony in the Hawkins Carlson Room in Rush Rhees Library.

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Faculty Publication: Jason Peck's "German Aesthetics: Fundamental Concepts from Baumgarten to Adorno"

September 27, 2016

We are excited to announce that Bloomsbury Academic has published German Aesthetics: Fundamental Concepts from Baumgarten to Adorno, co-edited by J. D. Mininger (associate professor of social and political theory at Vytautas Magnus University, Lithuania) and Jason Peck (visiting assistant professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures)!

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New Faces in MLC

September 7, 2016

Anna Rosensweig Elizabeth Weber
We are excited to introduce Anna Rosensweig (L) and Elizabeth E. Weber (R), the newest members of the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures!

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Faculty Publication: Jennifer L. Creech's "Mothers, Comrades, and Outcasts in East German Women's Film"

August 23, 2016

We are excited to announce that Indiana University Press has published Mothers, Comrades, and Outcasts in East German Women's Film by Jennifer L. Creech, associate professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures!

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Research Connections: In Goethe's Novel Families, Love Is All That Matters

July 22, 2016


What forms can families take? Can a family be effective only if it consists of a biological pairing of a man and a woman who produce their own offspring? Or can other combinations—two women or two men raising children, or couples with adopted children—be just as loving and supportive? In his early 19th-century literary works, Johann Goethe pointedly raises such questions—still debated today—and concludes that what really matters is not the gender of spouses and partners, or the lineage of their children, writes Susan Gustafson, the Karl F. and Bertha A. Fuchs Professor of German Studies, in her recently published book, Goethe's Families of the Heart (Bloomsbury Academic).

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Faculty Publication: Susan E. Gustafson's "Goethe's Families of the Heart"

July 1, 2016

Bloomsbury Academic has just published Goethe's Families of the Heart, the third book by Susan E. Gustafson, the Karl F. and Bertha A. Fuchs Professor of German Studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures!

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Newscenter: Donatella Stocchi-Perucchio Receives Honorary Professorship

June 3, 2016

This spring, the University of the Pacific (UP) in Lima, Peru, conferred an honorary professorship on Donatella Stocchi-Perucchio, associate professor of Italian in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. The designation recognizes her scholarly contributions to the field of Italian studies and comparative literature as well as her efforts in fostering a dialogue among Italianists worldwide. Stocchi-Perucchio’s relationship with scholars of world and Italian literature at the University of the Pacific began in 2010 and grew around issues of mutual interest. These include the study of the Italian poet Dante Alighieri, his minor works and his epic poem, the Divine Comedy, both in a comparative context and in relation to political philosophy, economics, and the arts.

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Newscenter: Kirt Komocki Named Professor of the Year in the Humanities

May 2, 2016

Kirt Komocki, senior lecturer in Spanish in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, won the Students’ Association Government’s Professor of the Year in the Humanities field. He joined Rochester in 2013 as a visiting assistant professor and was appointed a senior lecturer in 2014. Komocki earned his Ph.D from The Ohio State University. He will be leading the Modern Language and Cultures’ education abroad program this summer in Granada, Spain.

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Research Connections: Disability Studies Help Professor Illustrate Virtues of Inclusion

February 26, 2016


In 2009, Beth Jörgensen, a professor of Spanish in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, was preparing to teach a class on "coming of age" stories in Spanish America. She wanted to include a collaborative autobiography of Gabriela Brimmer, a Mexican woman who was profoundly disabled since birth with cerebral palsy, yet learned to communicate by manipulating an alphabet board with the toe of her left foot. Eventually Brimmer became a leading activist for the rights of disabled people in that nation. "I did not know that much about disability studies," Jörgensen confides. "So, in order to teach this in an informed way, I got busy reading as much background as I could about disability life writing." It was a revelation for her.

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Faculty Publication: "Spectacle," Co-edited by Jennifer L. Creech

September 1, 2015

We are excited to announce the publication of Spectacle, co-edited by Jennifer L. Creech (associate professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures) and Thomas O. Haakenson (faculty of visual studies at California College of the Arts)!

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Alysha Alani '15 Wins Best Student Presenter Award

August 20, 2015

Award presentationIn June, Alysha Alani ('15) received the "Best Student Presenter" award at the Second International Conference on Advances in Women's Studies at Ryerson University, Toronto. Entitled "Exploring Collegiate Perceptions of Feminism through Bem's Gender Schema Theory" and based on research conducted through UR's Susan B. Anthony Center, the paper was co-authored by Angela Clark-Taylor, MS; Adriana Rogachefsky, LMFT; and Catherine Cerulli, JD, PhD.

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Faculty in the News: Joanne Bernardi on WXXI's Connections

August 11, 2015

Joanne BernardiYesterday, Joanne Bernardi, associate professor of Japanese in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, appeared on WXXI's Connections with Evan Dawson to discuss the seventieth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as ongoing questions of nuclear ethics. Mr. Dawson and Professor Bernardi were also joined by Richard Dees (associate professor of Philosophy; associate professor of Bioethics; director of program in Bioethics at the University of Rochester) and Eric Wheeler (Counseling Center and Veteran Services at Monroe Community College).

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Faculty Publication: Robert Doran's "The Theory of the Sublime from Longinus to Kant"

July 1, 2015

Cambridge University Press has just published The Theory of the Sublime from Longinus to Kant, the newest volume by Robert Doran, associate professor of French and comparative literature in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures!

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Research Connections: French Film Festival "Through a Global Lens with a Political Filter"

March 13, 2015

Six French films on campus this month will provide University students and Rochester cinéphiles "a great basis to engage with, and research, contemporary French film," says Julie Papaioannou, senior lecturer in French and Francophone studies in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures. The theme of the Tournées Film Festival, to be held March 18-20 and 25-27, is "French and Francophone Cinema, Global Perspectives." The selections "highlight French film production in connection with the cinematic world at large," Papaioannou explains. "Their main themes of personal inner struggles, familial ties and disruptions, and political life are brought to focus through a global lens with a political filter."

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Newscenter: Digital Humanities Project Turns a Lens on Prewar Japan

December 12, 2014

Joanne Bernardi, associate professor of Japanese in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, has assembled hundreds of early 20th-century postcards, films, brochures, advertisements and other objects now on display at an interactive online archive and research project developed with the help of the Digital Humanities Center. "Re-envisioning Japan: Japan as Destination in 20th Century Visual and Material Culture" uses travel, education, and the production and exchange of images and objects as a "lens to investigate changing representations of Japan and its place in the world in the first half of the 20th Century."

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Research Connections: An "Intellectual Labor of Love" at the Intersection of Art and Science

October 17, 2014

In her latest book, Lens, Laboratory, Landscape: Observing Modern Spain, Claudia Schaefer (Rush Rhees chair and professor of Spanish and comparative literature and of film and media studies) explores the uses of observation for the acquisition of knowledge about the world in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Spain, set within the context of the country's problematic road to modernization and its participation in the European scientific community. For Schaefer, the book represents "an intellectual labor of love and a personal challenge to find a language of intersecting interests between the humanities and sciences."

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Newscenter: Robert Doran Explores the Concept of "the Sublime"

September 12, 2014

Robert Doran, associate professor of French and comparative literature in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, explores how and why the distinction between "beauty" and "the sublime" became important in his forthcoming book The Theory of the Sublime from Longinus to Kant (Cambridge University Press, 2015). "The concept of the sublime allows us to conceive of a certain kind of experience that normally would only be accessible using theological concepts," Doran explained in an interview. "It's a secularized version of religious experience. It's the experience of transcendence, but transcendence in the arts or in the aesthetic appreciation of nature."

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Faculty in the News: Kathleen Parthé in the "Times Literary Supplement"

October 15, 2013

A Herzen ReaderThe current issue of the esteemed Times Literary Supplement includes a glowing review of A Herzen Reader, edited and "admirably translated" by Kathleen Parthé, director of the Russian Studies Program. Featuring one hundred essays and editorials previously unavailable in English, A Herzen Reader reflects the diverse and complex positions articulated by the Russian radical thinker Alexander Herzen (1812–1870).

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Newscenter: Beth Jörgensen Wins Latin American Studies Association Book Award

August 22, 2012

Beth Jörgensen, professor of Spanish-American literature in the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, has won the 2011 book award in the humanities from the Mexico section of the Latin American Studies Association for her book Documents in Crisis: Nonfiction Literatures in Twentieth Century Mexico (SUNY Press). According to a citation from the association's selection committee, the book redefines scholarly understanding of modern Mexican literature by focusing on "nonfiction writing as a fundamental part of the landscape that has long been too heavily focused on poetry and fiction." The award is presented annually to a narrative or work of art published or produced between May 1 and December 31 of the previous year that reflects outstanding originality in its treatment of any aspect of Mexico.

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Rochester Review: Joanne Bernardi on "History, in Celluloid"

November 1, 2010

Professor Bernardi with her own collection of monster movie memorabilia
There are many iconic images of the nuclear age, but among those spawned by pop culture, perhaps none is more familiar than a certain enormous lizard. "Atomic Creatures: Godzilla," a film and media studies course taught this fall by Joanne Bernardi, an associate professor of Japanese and a member of the film and media studies program faculty, takes a look at the phenomenon that generated and helped define the Japanese kaiju eiga, or monster film. "I think it's the most important course I teach—it's a matter of life and death," says Bernardi, who says the films bring together cultural and historical responses to nuclear issues.

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Currents: Joanne Bernardi on "The 'Thingness' of Film"

March 30, 2009

Professor Joanne BernardiInspired by her experience at the Selznick program, Joanne Bernardi developed a new course offered this semester to River Campus students called "Film As Object," parented by the Department of Modern Languages and Culture and cross listed under the Film and Media Studies Program. "What Joanne Bernardi gained from her experience at the Selznick School was the technical knowledge of how film as an artifact and object work, while most film scholars rarely handle the object of their studies," says Jeff Stoiber, assistant curator at the Selznick School. "Combining her newfound knowledge from Selznick experts with her broad background of film history for her course, she is now a double threat!"

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