Undergraduate Program

Japanese Courses

Below is a list of recently offered undergraduate courses. Not all of these courses are offered in any given year, and there may be other courses offered some years. Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.

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JPN 101 ELEMENTARY JPN I

STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR BOTH LECTURE AND RECITATION. Designed to help beginners acquire a basic command of Modern Japanese. The classes will be conducted in English for the grammar lecture, recitation in Japanese. In the beginning, students will master “Hiragana and Katakana” writing systems. As the course progresses “Kanji’ Chinese characters will also be introduced. Classes emphasize reading, writing, listening and speaking. Requirements include regular assignments, quizzes, Lesson Tests and final Exam. Textbook: (1) Genki I: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, by Eri Banno Yutaka Ohno, et.al. (The Japan Times) (2) Course Workbook by Shino 6 credits.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 102 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II

Sequel to JPN 101. STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR BOTH LECTURE AND RECITATION. Lecture and recitation designed to help the students at the late beginning level acquire a practical command of modern Japanese in all areas. Although the main emphasis is still on speaking and listening, the students will have more opportunities for writing than in JPN 101. The classes will be conducted in both Japanese and English. The students will master, among other things, “keigo” (polite language), female vs. male speech style, and “direct” style verbals. Textbook: (1) Genki I: An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese, by Eri Banno Yutaka Ohno, et.al. (The Japan Times) (2) Course Workbook by Shino 6 credits.

Prerequisites: JPN 101 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 114 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATIONAL JAPANESE I

Emphasis on speaking skills with focus on current issues in Japanese culture and society. May be taken concurrently with JPN 151.

Prerequisites: JPN 102 or instructor's permission
Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 115 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATIONAL JAPANESE II

Emphasis on speaking skills with focus on current issues in Japanese culture and society. May be taken concurrently with JPN 152.

Prerequisites: JPN 151 or instructor's permission
Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 151 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR BOTH LECTURE AND RECITATION. Sequel to Japanese 102. Textbooks: (1) “Genki II” by Yutaka Ohno, Second Edition (The Japan Times) (Lessons 13 through 17) (2) Course Workbook by Tamate.

Prerequisites: JPN 102 or placement
Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 152 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR BOTH LECTURE AND RECITATION. Sequel to Japanese 151. Textbooks: (1) “Genki II” by Yutaka Ohno, Second Edition (The Japan Times) (Lessons 18 through 23) (2) Course Workbook by Tamate.

Prerequisites: JPN 151 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 201 ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

This course aims at the improvement of students' overall proficiency in the Japanese language. Listening and speaking skills will be improved through assignments based upon audio tapes, discussion, and role-playing in Japanese. Reading skills will be improved through reading of various "raw" materials. Class taught in Japanese.

Prerequisites: JPN 152 or placement
Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 202 ADVANCED INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

This course aims at further improvement of student's overall proficiency in the Japanese language. Students will start learning colloquial speech style used heavily among family members and/or close friends through the video program based on a Japanese TV drama. Reading skills will be improved through reading various "raw" materials. Essay assignments will be given to students regularly in order to brush up their writing skills. Requirements include unit quizzes, oral quizzes, a comprehensive final and some other little quizzes such as vocabulary tests. Class taught in Japanese.

Prerequisites: JPN 201 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 203 ADVANCED CONVERSATIONAL JAPANESE I

Provides students of JPN 201 level or higher with the opportunity to improve their speaking skills. Class activities include discussion of current issues and oral drills. The class will be conducted in Japanese, and is not intended for students who have already acquired near-native fluency.

Prerequisites: JPN 152 or instructor's permission
Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 204 ADVANCED CONVERSATIONAL JAPANESE II

Provides students of JPN 202 level or higher with the opportunity to improve their speaking skills. Class activities include discussion of current issues and oral drills. The class will be conducted in Japanese, and is not intended for students who have already acquired near-native fluency.

Prerequisites: JPN 201 or instructor's permission
Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 205 ADVANCED JAPANESE I

This course covers various aspects of contemporary Japanese culture as found in magazines, journals, television, film and videos. Class taught in Japanese.

Prerequisites: JPN 203
Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 205W ADVANCED JAPANESE I

This course covers various aspects of contemporary Japanese culture as found in magazines, journals, television, film and videos. Class taught in Japanese.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

JPN 206 ADVANCED JAPANESE II

Readings in Japanese in fiction and essays by popular Japanese writers. A video program based on a popularJapanese cartoon will enhance students' ability to understand different speech styles adopted by people at various social levels. Class taught in Japanese.

Prerequisites: JPN 205 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 206W ADVANCED JAPANESE II

Readings in Japanese in fiction and essays by popular Japanese writers. A video program based on a popularJapanese cartoon will enhance students' ability to understand different speech styles adopted by people at various social levels. Class taught in Japanese.

Prerequisites: JPN 205
Last Offered: Spring 2015

JPN 207 FILM AS OBJECT

Moving images recorded on analog film defined the 20th century in an unprecedented way. This course focuses on the tangible object that is the source of the image onscreen, and the social, cultural, and historical value of a reel of film as an organic element with a finite life cycle. We focus on the analog photographic element and its origins (both theatrical and small gauge), the basics of photochemical film technology, and film conservation and preservation. Guest lectures by staff of the Moving Image Department of George Eastman Museum provide a first-hand look at analog film and its preservation in action, allowing us to consider it as an ephemeral form of material culture: a multipurpose, visual record that is in addition to being art, entertainment, and evidentiary document, also an historical artifact. There are weekly film assignments. Class meets at George Eastman Museum and on River Campus (transportation provided).

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 208 TRADITIONS IN JAPANESE ART

A survey of Japan¿s traditional visual arts spanning the range from prehistoric decorated pottery up to the advent of photography. Attention to the social contexts of aesthetic experience and to the ideas of a ¿national culture.¿ Taught in English, additional work available in Japanese where appropriate.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

JPN 210 ANXIETY, IDENTITY, FANTASY: TOPICS IN "TRADITIONAL" JAPANESE CULTURE

This discussion-based course interrogates the construction and evolution of Japan’s cultural traditions and idioms from ancient times to the eve of modernity. Drawing from oral records and mythology, literary and historical texts, and performing and visual arts, among other mediums, this course asks students to understand and appreciate the dynamic contexts of Japanese “tradition.” At the same time, contemporary evocations of the past, as represented through manga and film, will help us understand the processes through which traditions are (re)invented and (re)made. This course is therefore invested in both the historical legacy of traditional Japan and the ways in which tradition itself remains central to contemporary evocations Japanese culture. No prior knowledge of Japan is required or expected.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

JPN 210W ANXIETY, IDENTITY, FANTASY: TOPICS IN "TRADITIONAL" JAPANESE CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

JPN 211 FICTIONS OF INTERIORITY: MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

This course will consider modern Japanese literature through a chronological look at a variety of novels, short stories, and essays from the late 19th century to present day. While we will devote considerable time to the canonical writings of Natsume Sôseki, Tanizaki Jun’ichirô, Ôe Kenzaburô, and Murakami Haruki—authors who are in many ways synonymous with Japanese literature itself—equal attention will be given to writers yet under-appreciated and under-analyzed. Through a combination of lectures and discussions, we will study not only the texts and authors, but also issues of gender, race, psychology, sexuality, morality, and history as they relate to the Japanese literary corpus. A selection of shorter fiction and a few novels will be available in English translation and students need not be familiar with Japanese.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

JPN 211W FICTIONS OF INTERIORITY: MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

JPN 212 HELLO KITTY MUST DIE: JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

In this multimedia course, we will examine a range of Japanese popular culture, including anime, manga, film, literature, and fashion. Through this exploration we will extend our understanding of Japanese cultural artifacts. But we will also use popular culture in Japan as a springboard for discussing pressing social issues such as gender, class, sexuality, nationalism, and consumer culture. Our goal is to rethink Japan through an investigation of popular culture, and to become attune to the mechanisms that have shaped and continue to shape Japan—its culture, its society, its place in the world. Class time will be devoted to lectures, discussions, and writing exercises.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 212W HELLO KITTY MUST DIE: JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 213 THE HISTORY AND STRUCTURE OF CHINESE AND JAPANESE

It is well known that Chinese civilization was central to the broad historical development of East Asian cultures including that of Japan, a relationship that might suggest that of ancient Hellenic Greek and Italic Latin. While much of Japan’s vocabulary and its writing system are rooted in Chinese, however, it is less well known that Chinese and Japanese belong in fact to two entirely unrelated language families, Sinic and Japonic. This course examines the linguistic structures, historical development and interactions of the two languages. Course topics include: theories of origins and language-family affiliations; the historical development of phonological and grammatical features; the development of writing systems; and the complex role played by language in cultural influence and interaction.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

JPN 214 ATOMIC CREATURES: GODZILLA

A focused study of Godzilla on film, beginning with the 1954 film that inspired and helped define the Japanese kaiju eiga genre. The larger context of the course is a critical investigation of genre film, specifically the science-fiction/horror/creature-feature film, and a careful consideration of the “culture of war” (World War II through 21st century). We begin with a sampling of seminal non-Japanese titles that provided the foundation for the Godzilla film paradigm, then focus on a close textual study of select “Godzilla films” that help us understand the historical and social contexts for Godzilla’s erratic trajectory since 1954. Recent DVD releases with both dubbed and original Japanese language versions enable us to dissect the culturally generated permutations of kaiju eiga.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 214W ATOMIC CREATURES: GODZILLA

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 215 MODERN JAPAN

The course will focus on the modern history of Japan from 1850 into the 1990s. The transformation of Japan from a traditional into a modern, industrial society with its costs, disruptions, and benefits will be emphasized. The emergence of Japan as a major power in East Asia, its expansion into Korea and Manchuria, and the growing conflict with the West, leading to the Pacific War, will also be covered as will Japanese postwar political, social, and economic change. All students will write a ten-page term paper on a subject related to modern Japanese history. Classes will be in lecture format with questions and discussions encouraged.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 216 TRADITIONAL JAPAN

This lecture course will cover Japanese history from the beginning to around 1850. Emphasis will be on the changing nature of political authority, the changing roles of the aristocrats, samurai warriors, and commoners, the emergence of new cultural forms, and the transformation of traditional Japanese society. Readings will include literature, diaries, political, social, and economic history, and material on Japanese women. Several films will be shown in conjunction with the course. Readings; See attached sheet.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

JPN 217 TRADITIONAL JAPANESE LITERATURE

This chronological survey of Japanese literature covers antiquity to the 18th century. We will consider the emergence of, contexts for, and aesthetics behind a variety of literary mediums including myths, prose, poetry, travelogues, diaries, and warrior tales. Conducted in a lecture/discussion format, this course focuses on literary works, though we will have opportunity to consider visual and aural interpretations and adaptations of many of the “great” works of classical Japanese letters. This course is intended to help students develop an appreciation for Japan’s literary heritage, while encouraging a sophisticated and comparative understanding of the prominent themes and motifs of literary texts. No prior knowledge of Japanese or Japan is required or expected. All texts will be read in English translation.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 217W TRADITIONAL JAPANESE LITERAT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 218 REEL WAR: WAR ON FILM

An exploration of war as it is portrayed on film.

JPN 219 MANGA AND ANIME

An exploration of Japanese popular culture as portrayed by the cartoon culture of manga (graphic novels) and anime (Japanese Animation). Material ranges from the origins of print and moving picture cartoon culture in the early twentieth century to the present. Issues addressed include national identity, global consumption, and genre cross fertilization, providing an opportunity to explore how Japanese culture informs these now widely popular forms of popular entertainment.

JPN 219A TOURIST JAPAN

Focused on (but not limited to) the first half of the 20th century, this course explores representations of Japan in a wide range of visual and material culture: ephemera generated by tourism and education; advertisements and souvenirs; and wartime propaganda traveling similar routes of exchange. Illustrations, guidebooks, photographs, and films reflect changing concepts of urban space, rural culture, industry, geography, and military and political authority. Recurrent iconography and coded images link tourism and educational objects and images with evolving concepts of nationalism and cultural identity. How is the meaning of modern in Japan useful to a study of the continuous transformation of culture in specific contexts, as in the transition from ukiyo-e culture to photography and animated films. This course has a digital component: students work (hands on) with the Re-Envisioning Japan Research Collection in curating their own digital exhibitions. Weekly film assignments. Trips to MAG/GEM (trans. incl.).

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 219W TOURIST JAPAN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 220 CULTURE OF URBAN JAPAN, 1650-1805

This course examines the spectacular urban culture of the Edo period against the background of new economic, political, and legal developments. Of special interest is the world of theaters and entertainment quarters that both reflected and supported the art and literature created by new constellations of social groups.

JPN 222 NOH DRAMA

In Western terms, Noh drama combines elements of classic Greek and medieval European drama with dance, music, and Christian rituals of confession, salvation, and redemption. Originally a variety of low entertainment, Noh drama was patronized after the mid-14th century as an elite art form by Japan's samurai rulers as a way of reinforcing the association of warrior power with the cachet of aristocratic learning, the weight of antique and modern Chinese learning, new and stylish modes of knowledge and conoisseurship, and the institutionalized power of the Buddhist church. As a dramatic form, Noh appropriates and integrates myth and legend, religious stories, historical chronicles, family histories, imperial lineages, and the institutionalized power of salvationary Buddhism. Students will write and stage a modern Noh drama. Class taught in English with additional instruction in Japanese as required for majors.

JPN 227 BODY POLITICS: NEGOTIATING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE DISCOURSES OF THE BODY IN JAPANESE CULTURE

This reading intensive course is centered on public and private discourses of the body in contemporary Japan. Topics will include, but are not limited to: gender and sexuality, reproductive rights and motherhood, body image and beauty standards, youth and old age, masculinity and femininity, and health and disease. Through the conduit of journal articles, films, autobiographical essays, fiction, manga, and scholarly critiques, this course will expose students to a variety of rhetorical strategies and popular mediums concerning the body in Japan. In addition, this course will enrich students’ understanding of issues facing contemporary Japan and the ways in which we read and write about the body.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 227W BODY POLITICS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 228 JOURNEY TO THE FEAST: CUISINE AND CULTURE IN MODERN JAPAN

This four week intensive and interdisciplinary course explores historical, cultural, economic, and geopolitical aspects of food in Japanese culture. Food and cuisine fill our stomachs, but also identify nations, religious groups, classes/castes and other communities, marking boundaries between ourselves and “Others.” Our class will examine Japanese culinary artifacts, including: the relationship between food and national identity, the ways in which food can be gendered, and how gustatory choices reflect historical and cultural shifts. We will read histories and ethnographies of representative Japanese foods; analyze gender and class dimensions of food; read food through a variety of theoretical lenses; and define and redefine Japan through its culinary pathways.

Last Offered: Summer 2016

JPN 228W JOURNEY TO THE FEAST

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2016

JPN 231 ASIAN CALLIGRAPHY: HISTORY AND PRACTICE I

An introduction to the Chinese and Japanese writing systems, including their historical development, artistic practices and practical applications. This entails the study of Kaisho (print script) of Kanji (Chinese characters) and the learning of the meanings of the Kanji. One class meeting per week will be devoted to the study of Calligraphy. Ideal for those studying Chinese or Japanese, but experience in the languages, while helpful, is not required. Please note that students must provide their own Asian Calligraphy equipment for practicing Kanji and complete weekly assignments.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 232 ASIAN CALLIGRAPHY: HISTORY AND PRACTICE II

An elemental study of the Chinese and Japanese writing systems, including their historical development, artistic practices and practical applications. This entails the study of Kaisho (print script), the Gyosho (cursive style) and Sosho (simplified cursive style) of Kanji (Chinese characters), as well as learning the meanings of the Kanji. One class meeting per week will be devoted to the study of calligraphy. Ideal for those who have studied some calligraphy previously, but this is not required. Likewise, previous study of Chinese or Japanese, while helpful, is not required. Please note that students must provide their own Asian calligraphy equipment for practicing Kanji and complete weekly assignments.

Prerequisites: While this course is open to everyone, students who wish to take two semesters of Asian calligraphy must start with JPN 231/CHI 231: "Asian Calligraphy: History and Practice I."
Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 233 THE CULTURE OF ZEN

Zen Buddhism was the core around which many of Japan’s greatest cultural achievements evolved. From the medieval period on, with its importation from China, the culture of Zen served as the primary context for much of Japanese metaphysics, architecture, landscape and interior design, medicine, ink painting, noh drama, haiku poetry, as well as the entire cultural complex known as the tea ceremony. Along with the Zen doctrinal and textual roots of these remarkable achievements, this course will examine the vibrant culture fostered in the medieval Zen monastic temple institution known as the Gozan and its dispersal into the culture at large.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

JPN 233W THE CULTURE OF ZEN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

JPN 234 HAIKU POETRY

Haiku poetry and its related art form, haiga ink-painting, were among the most important of the poetic and artistic genres of early-modern (1600-1900) Japan. This course studies the works of the great haiku masters Basho, Buson, Issa, and Shiki.

JPN 246 ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE

This seminar course is based on research on and discussion of a variety of issues of contemporary concern in Japan, including national, ethnic and racial identity; changing gender and sex roles; the family and generational conflict; immigration and work; the emperor system, war, and memory; cultural authenticity; and Japan's changing roles in Asia and in the world. Readings on issues begin with articles in the online English-language editions of Japan's main news media, extend outward to reports in the US news media, and eventually to popular and scholarly English-language studies of the issues involved. Grading is based on participation in informed discussion of issues raised in class (20%), and on four papers on issues to be chosen by each student with the instructors permission (20% each).

Last Offered: Fall 2014

JPN 246W CONTEMPORARY JPN CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

JPN 247 SAMURAI CONNECTIONS

No description

JPN 253 JAPANESE FASCISM & MISHIMA

No description

JPN 254 THE RISES AND FALLS OF MODERN JAPANESE LITERATURE

This course explores major works of Japanese literature written from 1885 to the present. Central to our exploration will be the rises and falls (of authors, literary schools, regimes, tectonic plates, and, perhaps, literature itself) of Japanese literature. The focus of this survey is Japan's rich body of prose narratives. This focus is supplemented by investigations of genres and media such as poetry, film, theater, photography, advertisements, historical nonfiction, anime, and manga. This course is taught in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 254W MODERN JPN LIT

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 255 NOVELS OF MURAKAMI HARUKI

The works of Japan’s best-known contemporary writer, including Norwegian Wood, A Wild Sheep Chase, Pinball 1973, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, The Windup Bird Chronicle, and short stories.

JPN 256 THE CITY IN FILM

No description

JPN 257 JPN MYSTERY FICTION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 258 JAPANESE SCIENCE FICTION IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

"A good science fiction story," Frederik Pohl proposes, "should be able to predict not the automobile, but the traffic jam." This course considers the "traffic jams"—the far-flung possible worlds imagined in Japanese science fiction—from the 1920s to the present. Genres covered include the short story, short short story, novel, manga, anime, and film. The course emphasizes close readings of literary texts and analysis of the global contexts that prompt Japan's science fictional musings. Japanese science fiction is considered in global perspective: Japanese works are considered alongside pertinent works from other national traditions of science fiction. All readings are done in English translation; all viewing have English subtitling.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 258W JAPANESE SCIENCE FICTION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 261 KYOTO

Credit—2 hours. This course examines the various forces that shaped Kyoto from the point of view of history, urban studies, religion, and art.

JPN 262 TOKYO

Credit—2 hours. This course examines the various forces that shaped Tokyo from the point of view of history, urban studies, religion, and art.

JPN 263 GREAT NOVELS OF CHINA & JAPAN

No description

JPN 267 CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART

No description

JPN 268 CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE ART

No description

JPN 269 "The Floating World of Japanese Art, 1570-1870"

This course explores the “floating world” of consumer desires and pleasures in Japan’s urban centers during the 17th - 19th centuries. Subjects include entertainment and advertising, theater and eroticism, body and gender, landscape and nature, poetry and culture, satire and allegory, and alien peoples and ideas. Special attention is given to the social contexts in which the visual products of this culture were created and consumed.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

JPN 270 RELIGION & JAPANESE CULTR

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

JPN 273 JAPANESE WOMEN WRITERS

A critical and historical introduction to Japanese women writers: the socio-historical, cultural, and ideological context for and emergence of a literary tradition.

JPN 274 Modern Japanese Women Writers

This course traces the history of modern Japanese women’s writing, beginning with the early twentieth-century and continuing to present day. In doing so, this course addresses the historical background and contribution of women writers to the development and progression of modern Japanese literature. Throughout the course, we will pay close attention to the ways in which Japanese women writers have used fiction to challenged convention and expectation. Key issues include sex and sexuality, the nature and rhetoric of desire, and the politics of the female body. Writers to be considered are Higuchi Ichiyô, Hirabayashi Taeko, Yamada Eimi, Miyabe Miyuki, Kanehara Hitomi, and many others. In addition, the course also asks students to engage with critical scholarship in English that offers new ways of thinking and talking about Japanese women's writing. No previous knowledge of Japan or Japanese is required.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

JPN 274W MODERN JPN WOMEN WRITERS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

JPN 283 HISTORY OF JAPANESE CINEMA

Japanese cinema from its origins to the 1960s: genre, narrative, diversity of style, theory, and technology; the visual image in a social, cultural and historical context.

JPN 284 MOBSTERS, MONSTERS & SWORDS

Origins, definitions, and dynamics of popular genres considered synonymous with Japanese cinema: swords, sci-fi, "yakuza noir," and anime.

JPN 284W MOBSTERS, MONSTERS, SWORDS

No description

JPN 285 DIRECTOR STUDIES: AKIRA KUROSAWA

The films of Akira Kurosawa, his co-workers, and the contemporary issues and aesthetic influences important to his career.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

JPN 286 JAPANESE NEW WAVE CINENA

Japanese New Wave cinema: theory and practice, 1960-1979.

JPN 287 NAGISA OSHIMA

The works of Nagisa Oshima: Shochiku, the Japanese New Wave, independent cinema, and beyond.

JPN 288 DIRECTORS STUDIES: YASUJIRO OZU

The myth and historical reality of Yasujiro Ozu (1923-1963), the "home drama” genre, and 20th c. Japanese culture and society

JPN 290 WOMEN IN JAPANESE FILM

Explores the representation of women in contemporary Japanese film. Begins with a sample of the prototype heroines (predominant in the films of Mizoguchi, Naruse, Ozu) who set the standard for what some Japanese critics describe as a "special Japanese brand of feminism," which they call "the worship of womanhood." Also examines genres based on gender-role archetypes and adaptations of women's literature.

JPN 291 CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE CINEMA

Japanese cinema's engagement with its contemporary context, focusing on reworking and reinterpreting familiar genres and Japanese cinema's significance in the global marketplace.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

JPN 292 JAPANESE ANIMATION

Anime as film form and cultural phenomenon. Content varies, from a survey of anime genres to the world views and visual style of specific directors; emphasis on anime as hybrid popular culture both local and global.

JPN 294 HAYAO MIYAZAKI AND PLANET GHIBLI

This course offers 1) a comprehensive “grass roots” study of anime as film form and cultural phenomenon; and 2) a more specific and guided investigation of the work of Hayao Miyazaki and the world view and visual sensibilities of his creation, Studio Ghibli. We begin by investigating where anime comes from: historical precedence, significant sources, defining influences and routes of cultural exchange. We then focus on Miyazaki’s work and the Ghibli corpus in order to examine the specifics of animated cinematic construction that distinguish his work (e.g., iconography, visual landscape, character design, narrative tropes, music); methods of adaptation, influence, and genre variation; reception and fan culture; and anime’s potential for providing unique perspectives on race, gender, landscape, identity, and Japan's historical and mythological past. NO AUDITS.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 294W MIYAZAKI & GHIBLI

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 390 SUPERVISED TEACHING

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 391W INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

JPN 392 PRACTICUM IN JAPANESE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 393 SENIOR ESSAY

A paper based upon independent study; required of concentrators.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 407 FILM AS OBJECT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 411 MODERN JPN LIT IN TRANS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

JPN 412 HELLO KITTY MUST DIE: JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 414 ATOMIC CREATURES: GODZILLA

Origins and development of the Japanese kaiju eiga (monster film): nuclear imagery and the science fiction/horror/creature film genre.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

JPN 414W ATOMIC CREATURES: GODZILLA

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 419A TOURIST JAPAN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

JPN 427 BODY POLITICS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 433 THE CULTURE OF ZEN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

JPN 446 CONTEMPORARY JPN CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

JPN 454 MODERN JPN LIT

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 457 JPN MYSTERY FICTION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 458 JAPANESE SCIENCE FICTION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 467 CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART

No description

JPN 474 MODERN JPN WOMEN WRITERS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

JPN 483 HISTORY OF JAPANESE CINEMA

Japanese cinema from its origins to the 1960s: genre, narrative, diversity of style, theory, and technology; the visual image in a social, cultural and historical context.

JPN 485 DIRECTOR STUDIES: AKIRA KUROSAWA

The films of Akira Kurosawa, his co-workers, and the contemporary issues and aesthetic influences important to his career.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

JPN 494 HAYAO MIYAZAKI AND PLANET GHIBLI

A course on the work of the animated films of Hayao Miyazaki, the world view and visual sensibilities of his creation, Studio Ghibli, and anime as film form and cultural phenomenon. Focusing on Miyazaki’s films, we will examine the "nuts and bolts" of animated cinematic construction (use of narrative space, character design, etc.); methods of adaptation, influence, and genre variation; anime reception and fan culture; and issues of race, gender, landscape, identity and cultural conscience. Such detailed analysis reveals the range and possibilities of anime and its place in popular culture on a local and global scale.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

JPN 498 CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE CINEMA

Japanese cinema's engagement with its contemporary context, focusing on reworking and reinterpreting familiar genres and Japanese cinema's significance in the global marketplace.

Last Offered: Spring 2010