Undergraduate Program

Italian Courses

Below is a list of recently offered undergraduate courses. Not all of these courses are offered in any given year, and there may be other courses offered some years. Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.

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IT 100A BEGINNING ITALIAN (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2015

IT 101 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I

The objective of the course is to provide beginners with a thorough grounding in all language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on both grammar and cultural information. Classes meet five times a week and combine language theory and practice. Each class is fifty minutes long. Students must sign up for both a MWF and a TR block. As far as Italian is concerned, the terms ¿lecture¿ and ¿recitation¿ conventionally used to identify the blocks have a purely bureaucratic significance and do not reflect in any way the pedagogical approach of the course.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 102 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II

Continuation of IT 101. The objective of the course is to provide beginners with a thorough grounding in all language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on both grammar and cultural information. Classes meet five times a week and combine language theory and practice. Each class is fifty minutes long. Students must sign up for both a MWF and a TR block. As far as Italian is concerned, the terms 'lecture' and 'recitation' conventionally used to identify the blocks have a purely bureaucratic significance and do not reflect in any way the pedagogical approach of the course.

Prerequisites: IT 101 or equivalent
Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 111 ELEMENTARY ITALIAN (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

The course offers an introduction to basic grammar with intensive training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. It also guides students in the process of observation, experimentation, and discovery of the culture. Students' assignments often involve interacting with Italians. Sports events, movies, and other 'surprise' events are scheduled to complement the course.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 114 CONVERSATIONAL ITALIAN

Conversation course designed to help students with some knowledge of Italian grammar develop facility with the spoken language. Emphasis on vocabulary-building. Class time devoted to debate, discussions, and conversations about current topics and aspects of contemporary Italian culture. Themes for discussion both extemporaneous and planned. Students are expected to prepare for the assigned themes in advance. Recommended in conjunction with any Italian course, except for IT 101, for extra oral practice. May be taken twice.

Prerequisites: At least one semester of College Italian or equivalent, with permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 124 MODERN & CONTEMPORARY ITALIAN CULTURE

Italian 124 is open to all students and addresses different aspects of modern and contemporary Italian culture. Topics may include politics, economics, mass media, intellectual life, education, popular culture; as well as the ethnic, economic, and cultural relations between Italy and Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, the European Community, and the United States. Since the specific topic of the course varies each year and the course is typically taught by a different visiting professor from the University of Siena/Arezzo, Italy, IT 124 may be taken more than once. Language of instruction: English.

Last Offered: Spring 2011

IT 150 CULTURE IN CONTEXT (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

This course focuses on the cultural experiences involved in living and studying for a semester in Arezzo. Activities consist of learning how to make – and then savor – local foods, encountering traditions, practicing tandem-speaking with Italian university students, participating in international workshops and city sponsored events. Visits to industrial and agricultural sites are included.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 151 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I

The purpose of Intermediate Italian 151 is that of perfecting the learning of the structure of the language in order to acquire proficiency in all its four skills: reading, speaking, listening and writing. While reviewing and re-learning the language as a whole, we will touch upon contemporary cultural issues of Italy and of her people.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 152 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

Continuation of IT 151. The aim of the course is to reinforce the student's reading, writing, listening and speaking skills in a meaningful cultural context. This objective is achieved through both a systematic study of the fundamentals of grammar and the analysis of a variety of cultural materials. Topics for study, writing practice, and discussion include literature, history and popular culture.

Prerequisites: IT 151 or permission of instuctor
Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 153 ACCELERATED ITALIAN (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

The course enhances comprehension and communication skills as well as knowledge of Italian grammar. Emphasis is on reading, vocabulary building, and perfecting oral and written skills.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 154 INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II

Continuation of IT 151. Readings and discussions on topics of Italian geography and economy.

IT 155 ADV IT COMPOSITN&CONVERSATN

No description

IT 157 ITALIAN IN ITALY

An intensive, intermediate level language and culture course taught in the historic city of Padova, Italy. Students live in families and experience four weeks of full immersion in Italian life. Classes meet five times a week in the morning for three hours a day. Cultural excursions to Venice, Verona, Florence, and other cities are an integral part of the program.

Prerequisites: One year of college Italian
Last Offered: Summer 2012

IT 159 ROMAN STRUCTURES: ENGINEERING IN THE CLASSICAL WORLD

This is an introductory course with no prerequisites and not calculus based. It begins with an intensive summer fieldwork in Rome and it consists of a study of Roman engineering focused primarily on civil engineering structures, and also including topics in mechanics, hydraulics, and materials. Modern theories in structural mechanics and strength of materials are used to analyze the practice, the achievements, and the limitations of Roman engineering.

IT 160 THE NEW EUROPE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 161 EUROPE TODAY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

IT 190Q ITALIAN REGIONS: GEOGRAPHY TO HISTORY, LANGUAGE TO CULTURE

While exploring the geographical and political configuration of the Italian territory, the course focuses on the Italian regions as discrete entities with their own historical, economic, linguistic, and cultural characteristics and on the multiple aspects of their urban and non-urban civilization. Among the topics of investigation are art, literature, and film; social, economic, and religious life; dialects; high cultural traditions and popular ones. Class taught in English, although students with basic knowledge of Italian have ample opportunity to practice and enhance their linguistics skills.

IT 195 DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART I. "INFERNO" AND "PURGATORIO"

The first of a sequence of two, the course approaches "The Divine Comedy" both as a poetic masterpiece and as an encyclopedia of medieval culture. Through a close textual analysis of "Inferno," and the first half of "Purgatorio," students learn how to approach Dante’s poetry as a vehicle for thought, an instrument of self-discovery, and a way to understand and affect the historical reality. They also gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as they intersect with the multiple levels of Dante’s concern, ranging from literature to history, from politics to government, from philosophy to theology. A visual component, including illustrations of the "Comedy" and multiple artworks pertinent to the narrative, complements the course. Class format includes lectures, discussion, and a weekly recitation session. Intensive class participation is encouraged. Dante I can be taken independently from Dante II. No prerequisites. Freshmen are welcome. Part of the Dante Humanities Cluster.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 195Q DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY I

The course aims at familiarizing students with one of the most significant texts in Western Culture. Through Dante's text, students will gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as well as on the political, literary, philosophical, and theological context of medieval Europe. The course will also provide students with an avenue of investigation on the problems of knowledge, and guide them in developing critical tools and research skills. The first part of the semester will be devoted to the creation of a historical and intellectual frame of reference in which to locate The Divine Comedy. The second part will focus on Inferno and a few cantos of Purgatorio. Lectures and class discussion will be complemented by a weekly recitation session. Students enrolled for the upper level cross listings will be assigned a separate complementary reading list with additional primary and secondary sources.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

IT 196 DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY, PT II

No description

IT 196Q DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY II

This course is the second segment of a two-semester sequence on the Divine Comedy. The purpose of the sequence is to introduce students interested in the liberal arts to one of the most significant texts in Western civilization. While reading about Dante's adventurous journey from Inferno to Paradise, students will gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions, and on the political, literary, philosophical, and theological dimensions of medieval European culture. The sequence will also provide students with an avenue of investigation on the problem of knowledge --one of the poem's central concerns-- and guide them in developing critical tools and research skills. This course will consist on a close reading of the second part of Purgatory and of Paradise. Lectures and class discussion will be complemented by a weekly recitation session.

Prerequisites: IT 195Q, CLT 116Q, REL 197Q, IT 220, ENG 206, HIS 156
Last Offered: Spring 2013

IT 197 THE DIVINE COMEDY OF DANTE ALIGHIERI: DISCOVER THE WONDERS OF A MEDIAEVAL MIND

The course approaches The Divine Comedy both as a poetic masterpiece and as an encyclopedia of medieval culture. Through a close textual analysis of selected cantos from Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, students learn how to approach poetry as a vehicle for thought, an instrument of self-discovery, and a way to understand and affect the world. They also gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as they intersect with the multiple levels of Dante's concern ranging from literature to history, from politics to government, from philosophy to theology. Lectures and class discussion will be complemented by a weekly recitation session. Intensive class participation is encouraged. No prerequisites.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 197Q DIVINE COMEDY OF DANTE ALIGHIERI

The course approaches The Divine Comedy both as a poetic masterpiece and as an encyclopedia of medieval culture. Through a close textual analysis of selected cantos from Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, students learn how to approach poetry as a vehicle for thought, an instrument of self-discovery, and a way to understand and affect the world. They also gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as they intersect with the multiple levels of Dante's concern ranging from literature to history, from politics to government, from philosophy to theology. Lectures and class discussion will be complemented by a weekly recitation session. Intensive class participation is encouraged. No prerequisites.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

IT 200 ADVANCED ITALIAN COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION

Designed for students who already have a basic knowledge of spoken and written Italian, this course addresses different aspects of modern and contemporary Italian culture emphasizing, at the same time, the usage of Italian language. Topics may include politics, economics, mass media, intellectual life, education, popular culture: as well as the ethnic, economic, and cultural relations between Italy and Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, the European Community, and the United States. Since the specific topic of the course varies each year and the course is typically taught by a different visiting professor from the University of Siena/Arezzo, Italy, IT 200 may be taken more than once. The course meets three times a week and coincides for two thirds with IT 124. Language of Instruction: Italian and English.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 202 INTRO TO ITALIAN CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

IT 203 INTRO TO ITALIAN LITERATURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 207 INTERMED IT IN ITALY (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

An intensive, intermediate level language and culture course taught in the historic city of Padova, Italy. Students live in families and experience four weeks of full immersion in Italian life. Classes meet five times a week in the morning for three hours a day. Cultural excursions to Venice, Verona, Florence, and other cities are an integral part of the program.

Prerequisites: One year of college Italian.
Last Offered: Summer 2015

IT 208 ADVANCED TUTORIAL IN ITALIAN

The course is designed for advanced students. It involves class practice and independent projects.

IT 220 DIVINE COMEDY I

The course aims at familiarizing students with one of the most significant texts in Western Culture. Through Dante's text, students will gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as well as on the political, literary, philosophical, and theological context of medieval Europe. The course will also provide students with an avenue of investigation on the problems of knowledge, and guide them in developing critical tools and research skills. The first part of the semester will be devoted to the creation of a historical and intellectual frame of reference in which to locate The Divine Comedy. The second part will focus on Inferno and a few cantos of Purgatorio. Lectures and class discussion will be complemented by a weekly recitation session. Students enrolled for the upper level cross listings will be assigned a separate complementary reading list with additional primary and secondary sources.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 221 DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY II

The course approaches The Divine Comedy both as a poetic masterpiece and as an encyclopedia of medieval culture. Through a close textual analysis of selected cantos from Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, students learn how to approach poetry as a vehicle for thought, an instrument of self-discovery, and a way to understand and affect the world. They also gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as they intersect with the multiple levels of Dante's concern ranging from literature to history, from politics to government, from philosophy to theology. Class format includes lectures and discussion. Intensive class participation is encouraged. No prerequisites.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

IT 222 BOCCACCIO'S DECAMERON

The course aims to study the Decameron as a book of love that draws its inspiration from Dante's story of Paolo and Francesca in the Fifth Canto of Inferno; as a secular text that defies major conventions of medieval writing; as a social commentary on institutions, social classes, and power structures; as a reflection on the interplay between aesthetics and other medieval cultural codes and traditions such as medicine, law, patristics, economics, ethics, and courtly love. Illustrations, visual interpretations, and potential for theatrical adaptations of the text are included in the discussion.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

IT 223 MONUMENTS OF ANCIENT ITALY: HISTORY, STRUCTURE, FORM (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

The course studies the archaeology and architecture of buildings in ancient Italy from the fifth century BC to the fourth century AD, adopting a multidisciplinary approach based on archeological evidence, technical and functional aspects, and historical significance. Classes are taught on location and focus on the most relevant monuments and archeological sites in central and southern Italy, including Rome, Ostia Antica, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Baia, and Paestum. The course is divided into three parts: (1) structural design and technical issues related to ancient monuments, (2) monuments of Etruscan Italy and Magna Grecia, and (3) Roman monuments.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 224 TOPICS IN ITALIAN CULTURE

Italian 224 addresses different aspects of modern and contemporary Italian culture. Topics may include politics, economics, mass media, intellectual life, education, popular culture; as well as the ethnic, economic, and cultural relations between Italy and Eastern Europe, Asia, Africa, the European Community, and the United States. Since the specific topic of the course varies each year and the course is typically taught by a different visiting professor from the University of Siena/Arezzo, Italy, IT 124 may be taken more than once. Language of instruction: English.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Italian language.
Last Offered: Spring 2011

IT 224A TOPICS IN ITALIAN CULTURE

Selected topics in Italian culture taught by the visiting instructor from Arezzo, Italy.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 224B TOPICS IN ITALIAN CULTURE

Selected topics in Italian culture taught by the visiting instructor from Arezzo, Italy.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 225 DIVINE COMEDY OF DANTE ALIGHIERI

The course approaches The Divine Comedy both as a poetic masterpiece and as an encyclopedia of medieval culture. Through a close textual analysis of selected cantos from Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso, students learn how to approach poetry as a vehicle for thought, an instrument of self-discovery, and a way to understand and affect the world. They also gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as they intersect with the multiple levels of Dante's concern ranging from literature to history, from politics to government, from philosophy to theology. Class format includes lectures and discussion. Intensive class participation is encouraged. No prerequisites.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 228 ITALY FROM NAPOLEON TO THE FIRST REPUBLIC (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

The Italian peninsula has a history that goes back at least 2500 years. But the state of Italy, founded in 1861, is younger than the United States. At the intersection of these two facts lies the main theme of our journey from the Napoleonic invasion of Italy to the approval of the constitution of the Republic of Italy: the difficulty faced by the political leaders of united Italy in getting its citizens to identify with the Italian state. Historical accounts and documents, integrated with a selection of literary, operatic, and cinematic materials, constitute the main sources of information and analysis.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 229 PHILOSOPHY OF ART

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

IT 230 ITALIAN CITIES & THEIR CIVILIZATION

The course addresses aspects of the history, literature, art, politics, music, and folklore of a few major Italian cities such as Siena, Florence, Pisa, Rome, Naples, Palermo, Verona, and Venice.

IT 231 FLORENCE THE WONDEROUS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 244 ART, ARCHITECTURE, AND LITERATURE IN THE AGE OF DANTE AND BEYOND (TAUGHT IN AREZZO, ITALY)

When we look at works of art in museums, galleries, and churches we are, in most cases, looking at them out of context. Furthermore, when we look at early Renaissance paintings we do not see them through the eyes of the people who produced them or for whom they were produced. We have to learn to see them as they might have been seen. We can begin to do this by learning how to read and to interpret the complex elements at play beneath the immediate surface by setting the artist, his work, and his public in their social and religious historical contexts, and by exploring the universal unspoken language of signs and symbols used by artists. The course content is based on painted forms, i.e., panels, canvases, and frescos from the Trecento and Quattrocento with an emphasis on Tuscan painting. The selection, as far as possible, takes advantage of the availability of works in churches, museums, and galleries within easy visiting distance of Arezzo.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 245 DANTE: A MULTIMEDIA LAB

Dante’s Comedy has never ceased to inspire the visual arts, music, theater, cinema, and other manifestations of popular culture. Western art is a repository of artistic representations of biblical and classical traditions arguably pertinent to his text. The Comedy evokes the historical and geographic reality of Dante’s world still there to be interrogated. Privileging the visual arts and the illustrations of the poem, students participating in this experimental workshop assess the scope of this visual “territory”; develop analogical thinking by using the Comedy as a source for associations of ideas and imaginative comparisons; find art images in books, museums, and internet, and research on artist, time period, and style; practice analytic thinking by arguing for the significance of images in themselves and in relation to Dante’s text; contribute original entries to the Commedia Portal, a student-designed digital companion to the Comedy. Prerequisites: one UR Dante course or permission of instructor.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

IT 246 VENICE AND THE JEWS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 247 POLITICS AND CULTURE IN FASCIST ITALY

Interviewed by the Chicago Daily News in 1924, Mussolini said that Fascism was “the greatest experiment in history in making Italians.” Within the historical and political framework of the so-called Ventennio Fascista—from 1922 to 1943—the course examines Mussolini’s cultural politics as a fundamental strategy not only to gain popular consent and propagate the ideology of the regime, but to implement his vision of Italian national identity. Relying on both material culture, and historical documents and analyses, we will study the fascist philosophy and politics of education, the myth of Rome and its imperial legacy, the archeological, architectural, and restoration projects, the graphic arts, fashion, sports, and documentary film.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

IT 248 MODERN ITALY THROUGH FILM

Taking the inspiration from Martin Scorsese’s anthological film My Voyage to Italy, the course focuses on a few momentous episodes and phenomena of Italian political, social, and cultural history as portrayed and interpreted in film. We will discuss aspects of Risorgimento, Fascism, the World Wars and their aftermath, the culture of individual cities, the contrast between North and South, the condition of women, emigration and immigration, power and repression, spirituality, and secularism. Among the major film directors, we will include Rossellini, Visconti, Fellini, Olmi, and Bertolucci. The analysis of the movies will be integrated with readings from the fields of history, literature, criticism, and theater. A glance at Verdi’s operas in the Nineteenth Century and at the tradition of social song as it develops in the post war period will complement the course. This course is complementary to HIS 228 offered in Arezzo.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 276 ITALY: A CULTURAL MOSAIC

The course consists of four units taught sequentially by American, Italian, and Israeli professors. It will be coordinated by Professor Donna Logan, Director of the Arezzo Program on location. Classroom instruction will be enhanced by field trips. Requirements; class attendance and participation, final paper/test on mosaic segment.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

IT 390 SUPERVISED TEACHING

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 391W INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

IT 392 PRACTICUM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

IT 393 SENIOR PROJECT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017