Undergraduate Program

German Courses

Below is a list of recently offered undergraduate courses. Not all of these courses are offered in any given year, and there may be other courses offered some years. Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.

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GER 101 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I

This is the first semester of a two-semester sequence using an exciting new interactive approach to language learning. Students are encouraged, right from the start, to communicate in German utilizing basic vocabulary and authentic expressions in their spoken and written work. Listening comprehension is honed using audio taped material featuring a variety of native speakers, while a series of video tapes provide a basic introduction to the cultures of German speaking countries.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 102 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II

This is the second semester of a two-semester sequence using an exciting new interactive approach to language learning. Students are encouraged, right from the start, to communicate in German utilizing basic vocabulary and authentic expressions in their spoken and written work . Listening comprehension is honed using audio taped material featuring a variety of native speakers, while a series of video tapes provide a basic introduction to the cultures of German speaking countries.

Prerequisites: GER 101 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 110 JUSTICE AND EQUALITY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

GER 112 GERMAN FOR READING KNOWLEDGE

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who want more practice in reading and comprehending longer texts. Emphasis is on practical skills and reading various sorts of texts, from newspaper articles to fiction. It is a particularly useful supplement for GER 200. However, you can also take either course separately.

GER 114 CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN

This is a good way to improve your speaking skills and/or stay in touch with German while you are too busy to enroll in a regular course.

Prerequisites: GER 102 or instructor's permission

GER 132 INTRODUCTION TO THE ART OF FILM

As an introduction to the art of film, this course will present the concepts of film form, film aesthetics, and film style, while remaining attentive to the various ways in which cinema also involves an interaction with audiences and larger social structures.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 151 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

Process writing, reading, and listening exercises provide the context in this course for a thorough review of German grammatical structures. Students are expected to write short, weekly essays; complete weekly assignments in listening, reading and/or grammar; and hone their speaking skills through active class participation. Goal of this two-semester sequence is communicative proficiency.

Prerequisites: GER 102 or placement
Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 152 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

Process writing, reading, and listening exercises provide the context in this course for a thorough review of German grammatical structures. Students are expected to write short, weekly essays, complete weekly assignments in listening, and hone their speaking skills through active class participation. In GER 152, the focus is shifted slightly toward reading authentic material; short pieces of fiction and newspaper articles. Goal of this two-semester sequence is communicative proficiency.

Prerequisites: GER 151 or placement
Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 157 GERMAN IN GERMANY

Students experience the excitement of Berlin, historic center of Germany and capital of the re-unified state. Students stay in the international center of the European Academy located in picturesque Grunewald. Mornings are devoted to intermediate or advanced German language classes and individual work; afternoons and weekends are free for exploring and for excursions to nearby Dresden, Potsdam, and Baltic seashore. Program fee includes ground transportation in Germany, lodging and breakfasts, and main meals at the European Academy in Berlin, German language instruction, and some excursions. Special application required.

Last Offered: Summer 2017

GER 160 THE NEW EUROPE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 161 EUROPE TODAY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 200 ADVANCED CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION

This class assumes enough knowledge of the languge for reading somewhat longer fictional and nonfictional texts and viewing German films in the original. The class is organized around general topics and themes. Students will write weekly essays in German on select topics. Class taught in German.

Prerequisites: GER 152 or placement
Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 200W ADVANCED CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION

This class assumes enough knowledge of the languge for reading somewhat longer fictional and nonfictional texts and viewing German films in the original. The class is organized around general topics and themes. Students will write weekly essays in German on select topics. Class taught in German.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 202 INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES

This is one of several core classes required for the major. Students should have completed at least 152 and preferably 200. This course will introduce students to basic principles of cultural analysis at the heart of the discipline of German Studies. Emphasis will focus on how the media act to form and facilitate various aspects of issues in contemporary German culture.

Prerequisites: GER 152 (preferably GER 200) or instructor's permission
Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 202W INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES

This is one of several core classes required for the major. Students should have completed at least 152 and preferably 200. This course will introduce students to basic principles of cultural analysis at the heart of the discipline of German Studies. Emphasis will focus on how the media act to form and facilitate various aspects of issues in contemporary German culture.

Prerequisites: GER 200 or equivalent
Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 203 INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE

Everything you ever wanted to know about German literature but were afraid to ask. This course looks at German poems, plays and novellas from various historical periods and within the context of several techniques of interpretation. It is designed to prepare students for sophisticated analysis of literary texts.

Prerequisites: GER 200 or instructor's permission
Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 203W INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN LITERATURE

Everything you ever wanted to know about German literature but were afraid to ask. This course looks at German poems, plays and novellas from various historical periods and within the context of several techniques of interpretation. It is designed to prepare students for sophisticated analysis of literary texts.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 204 MARX AND MARXISM

It is not overstated to say that the works of Karl Marx have provided the transformational impulse to many of the changes of the 20th century. Who was this person, Karl Marx? Why is it that in this post-Cold War world his writings continue both to inspire and threaten contemporary readers? How have those inspired by Marx further developed his ideas to constitute the discourse of Marxism? In this course we will begin with discussions of key works by Marx. We will then move on to examine some significant contributions to Marxism. Additionally majors and minors can sign up for GER 211 where significant texts will be read and discussed in German.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 204A ITALIAN PHILOSOPHY, 1922-1945

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

GER 205 NIETZSCHE AND THE NIETZSCHEANS: NIETZSCHE AND THE JEWISH QUESTION

Friedrich Nietzsche continues to be one of the most influential modern philosophers, yet controversy surrounds almost every aspect of his life and work, specifically his relationship to both the Jewish people and Judaism. In this course we will read the most relevant texts on Nietzsche’s view of the “Judeo-Christian” tradition as well as his remarks on the Jewish nation. From there, we will read a number of Jewish writers who both avow and disavow Nietzsche’s influence on their work. Authors include: Franz Kafka, Sigmund Freud, Sara Kaufman, Jacob Taubes, Jacques Derrida.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

GER 206 FREUD AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

Freud is one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. His ground-breaking work on dreams, the Oedipus Complex, and psychoanalytic method have profoundly changed our understanding of the psyche and social interaction. This course provides a basic survey of Freud’s most important and often controversial writings/discoveries within their historical context and with regards to significant criticisms of his work. “Freud: An Introduction” is part of a cluster which includes courses of Marx and Nietzsche (these courses need not be taken in any particular order) Additionally majors and minors can sign up for GER 211 where significant texts will be read and discussed in German.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

GER 207 GERMAN IN GERMANY

An intensive program offered in German at all levels in Berlin, Germany, for one month in summer. Instruction by native Germans with University of Rochester faculty member in residence. Includes side trips and excursions in this historic area.

Last Offered: Summer 2017

GER 209 COWBOYS & INDIANS

What makes a Western a Western? Is it cowboys and Indians and vistas of the American West? Is is a Western if tough guy Clint Eastwood stars in a film by an Italian director shot in Spain? Or if a German who had never been to the United States writes about the heroic Indian Winnetou and the film versions of the novels are shot in Eastern Europe? This course will explore the myth of the American West in film and literature, including Westerns from Germany, Asia, and of course, the US. Texts and discussions will be in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

GER 211 Schlemiels, Pariahs and Parvenus: The Jewish Writer and Rebel

In February 2011, the website Jewcy published a list of the 50 most essential works of Jewish fiction of the last 100 years. The featured books come from many different languages, cultures, and time periods and are written in a myriad of literary styles. Although few would argue with the names on the list (Kafka, Bellow, Singer), the diversity of the authors involved raises the question: what makes Jewish literature Jewish? This course will attempt to answer that question by looking at an international group of writers (some of whom identify as Jewish and some of whom do not) who often challenge their (religious and cultural) upbringing as well as the dominant politics of the countries in which they live. The authors we will read include: Franz Kafka, Jakov Lind, Bruno Schulz, Edmund Jabès, Georges Perec and Clarice Lispector.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

GER 212 MONSTERS, GHOSTS & ALIENS: FROM SCHILLER TO STEPHEN KING

This course focuses on the horror genre as popular entertainment in Germany, England, and the US in the 19th and 20th centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of "others" as monsters in literature and film (Frankenstein, Vampires, Devils, Aliens, etc.). Authors/filmmakers include: Hoffmann, Poe,  Shelley, Stoker, Jackson, Rice, Harris, King, Murnau, Jordan, Wise, Siegel, Kubrick, Demme, . This course is part of the Horror in Literature & Film Cluster.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

GER 214 FAIRY TALES, MYTHS & LEGENDS

Grimm's fairy tales to urban legends, this course will examine the stories we love to tell ourselves. They horrify us and, yet, strangely comfort us as well. What is it that causes this effect? How do these tales help us shape the world around us? This course is part of the humanities cluster "Horror in Literature and Film." It is designed to familiarize students with the tools of cultural studies.

Last Offered: Spring 2011

GER 215 BERLIN: TALES OF A CITY

Who or what defines a city? Do architecture, cultural productions and politics distinguish it, or is it characterized by the banal activities at work, in the home, or in the public gardens? In this course we will encounter Berlin in the visual arts, literature, and film, as well as in historical and philosophical texts. Questions of gender, class, race and sexuality will enable us to approach the city from various perspective so as to better understand it as both a site of and metaphor for artistic production, philosophical reflection, political engagement and banal existence. All readings and discussions in ENGLISH. Freshmen and sophomores especially encouraged.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

GER 216 Dungeons & Dragons: Myths and Legends in German Literature

With the recent revival of Wagner’s Ring Cycle at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, the continued popularity of J.R.R. Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings novels and recent film adaptations of Beowulf and Tristan and Isolde , it’s easy to see that people still regularly like to “get medieval”. In this course we’re going to look at the German origins of these modern texts by reading the original source material: The Nibelungenlied , Parzival , Tristan as well as many other important medieval works. We will also look at modern variations on those texts, from Wagner and Tolkein to modern role-playing and video games that use the medieval period as their settings.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

GER 218 AND NOW... DEEP THOUGHTS WITH GERMAN-JEWISH THINKERS!

Now more than ever, a full account of German-Jewish intellectual history is needed. The central themes of the class will be: assimilation, acculturation, tolerance, radicalization, liberation, totalitarianism, and neoliberalism—all of which have been brought up by the people whose work we will read in the class. For example, Mendelssohn was publicly asked to renounce Judaism in the 1770s; "Jerusalem" was his philosophical response. Heine wrote "Germany: A Winter’s Tale" in exile, because he was no longer allowed to live in his beloved German speaking homeland without fear of state reprisal. Benjamin wrote his most important work in exile. Arendt spent her life after World War II investigating the history of totalitarianism. Adorno spent time after World War II investigating the sociological and psychological origins of the authoritarian personality. We will be reading all of these authors and many more, and attempting to understand their reflections in the context of our current situation.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 219 WEIMAR CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

GER 220 SEXUALITY & GENDER: 18TH-CENTURY REPRESENTATIONS

This course explores 18th century conceptions/constructions of the body, sexuality, and gender as manifest in medical papers, handbooks, aesthetic essays, and literary works to include Lessing’s Laocoon and Philotas, Fielding’s The Female Husband, Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Cleland’s Fanny Hill, de Sade’s Justine, Goethe’s Gotz von Berlichingen, Kleist’s Holy Caecilia and Puppet Theater, Diderot’s The Nun, Shelley’s Frankenstein. Additional theoretical readings include: Foucault, Kristeva, Butler, Sedgwick, Gilman, Habermas, Cassirer, Todorov, Laqueur, and G.S. Rousseau.

GER 221 GENDER LOVE & FAMILIES

This course explores the same-sex desires, love, non-exclusive relationships, and adoptive families with two fathers, two mothers, etc. that were represented as ideal relationships in 18th century German literature. In contrast to traditional views of the 18th century obsession with bourgeois and aristocratic families determined by fathers interested only in economic endeavors and preserving heritage, this course will explore the counter discourses that arose in the 18th century that highlighted the fundamental need for love as the foundation of all families. This course is taught in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 228 KAFKA AND KLEIST

Franz Kafka is one of Austria's most famous and influential writers. His short prose works have had a tremendous impact on contemporary literature and cultural studies. In this course you will learn what "kafkaesque" means in its complexity. Heinrich von Kleist is less well-known in the US, but he, like Kafka, provides representations of modern bureaucratic nightmares, of blurred boundaries between reality and fantasy, ailing artists, and non-existent or idolized women. This course is taught in German.

Prerequisites: GER 200 or instructor's permission

GER 229 KAFKA & HIS WORLD

This course explores the weird, dreamlike, eerie, and inexplicable world of Kafkas writings. In Kafkas stories dogs conduct investigations, apes report to academies, men turn into bugs, the Statue of Liberty holds up a sword, and arrests occur without explanation as all expectations and assurances about the 'rules' of existence, thought, and social order come into question. In this course we will read texts such as: The Trial, The Metamorphosis, Amerika, The Castle, Investigations of a Dog, A Report to an Academy, In the Penal Colony, and A Hunger Artist. This course is taught in English.

Prerequisites: GER 106 for GER 229 only
Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 230 POE AND HOFFMANN: UNCANNY STORIES

This course explores the beginnings of the horror and detective genres in the 19th century. Particular attention is devoted to the narrative structure, tropes, and psychological content of the strange tales by Poe and Hoffmann. Theories of horror are also addressed to include discussions by lessing, Todorov, Huet, and Kristeva.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

GER 231 GERMAN JEWS

Jews have lived in Germany since the Middle Ages and have contributed a great deal to German Culture, as well as developing unique German Jewish cultures; these facts are often overshadowed by the tragic events of World War II. In this seminar we will explore the rich and diverse German Jewish cultures of nineteenth and twentieth centuries in a range of texts including fiction, travel texts, philosophical and historical writings. Topics will include the Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment), assimilation, Zionism, anti-Semitism and the relationship between East and West European Jews. Readings and discussions in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

GER 232 WIZARDS, MAGIC AND FANTASY

This course traces the development of the fantasy literature genre from ETA Hoffman’s The Golden Pot to JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Particular attention is devoted to the tropes and structures of fantasy narratives as they offer the reader an escape from a mundane or threatening world and provide intricate social critiques. Topics addressed include: wizards, witches, talking cats, flights of fantasy, new worlds, and social consructions of work, class, others, families, mothers, fathers, masculinity, femininity etc. Authors include: Hoffmann, Rowling, Shelley, Orwell, Tolkien, Kafka, Atwood etc.

GER 234 STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 235 HITLER'S GERMANY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 237 AFTER THE WALL

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

GER 245 WEIMAR REPUBLIC: 1918 - 1933

No description

GER 246 WALKING ON YOUR HEAD: WRITING VERTIGO IN GERMAN LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

Beginning in the 18th century a new question arises with regard to the subject’s orientation in thought. However, almost as soon as this orientation has taken place, its double, vertigo, appears as a pathological inversion of the overly subjective interpretation of truth. This double, which haunts the last two centuries of thought, ultimately empties the subject of all content. Although this de-centering of the subject does produce a compensatory relief from certain social constraints, it is not always easily controlled. In this course we will read a series of texts that deal with this problem of vertigo.

GER 247 HOLOCAUST: AFFECT AND ABSENCE

How does one represent the unrepresentable? This is the key question we will explore as we look at films and literature about the Holocaust. As we look at fictional films, novels, documentaries and memoirs, we will discuss topics including memory, trauma, truth and representation. This course offers a look at the ways in which artists and their audiences negotiate the themes of loss, horror and redemption within the context of the Holocaust and its aftermath.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 248 ON THE MOVE: TRAVELERS, WANDERERS AND EXPLORERS

This course covers a wide variety of texts in which mobility plays a central role, including films, cultural theory and fiction. The time period we cover will be from the nineteenth century to the present day. Some of the questions we will explore are: What are the reasons people move from one place to another? Who controls the movement and how? How do texts allow us as viewers and readers travel? Texts and discussions are in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

GER 249 BESTSELLERS OF THE NEW GENERATION

This course explores the surging popularity in Germany of short stories and novels written by young women writers of the New Generation. These literary works strive to depict contemporary German lifestyles and particularly those of young people in cities like Berlin. Class taught in German.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

GER 252 BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY: THE URBAN IMAGINATION

The city in film and literature is never just a physical space - discourses of modernity and urban life are mapped onto real and imagines urban spaces. In this course we will explore how the relationship between the spaces of the city and the stories told about and through them shape our understanding of urban life. Some of the texts we will examine are: Fritz Lang’s M, Arthur Schnitzler’s Dream Story, and Lloyd Bacon’s 42nd Street.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 256 GERMANY YEAR ZERO: POST-WAR GERMAN LITERATURE, 1945-89

Franz Kafka is one of Austria's most famous and influential writers. His short prose works have had a tremendous impact on contemporary literature and cultural studies. In this course you will learn what "kafkaesque" means in its complexity. Heinrich von Kleist is less well-known in the US, but he, like Kafka, provides representations of modern bureaucratic nightmares, of blurred boundaries between reality and fantasy, ailing artists, and non-existent or idolized women. This course is taught in German.

Prerequisites: GER 200, or instructor's permission
Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 260 Truth and Power

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

GER 261 WEIMAR FILM & FILM THEORY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 262 STRANGERS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 268 THE ESSENTIAL GOETHE

No description

GER 269 IT'S ALIVE! The Body in 20th Century German Literature & Film

This course will explore the body as a site of discourse in 20th-century German-speaking literature and film. We will attempt to uncover a variety of corporeal meanings constructed by German literary and cinematic texts: the body and/as machine, the body of the Jew, the aestheticized body, the sexualized body, the divided body/body parts, and the globalized body. Each text will be explored in relation to its socio-historical context, providing students with a general overview of German-speaking culture of the period.

GER 272 GENDER & SEXUALITY IN THE 20TH CENTURY

This course will examine literary, artistic, and theoretical representations of gender and sexuality as they have changed in the course of the 20 Century. The focus will be on texts from Western Europe and the US, but we will also consider other perspectives. From the New Women to French Feminists and transnational feminism. from homophile societies to “queer nation and gay marriage, from Sigmund Freud to Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, we will explore the contested and politically charged debates around gender and sexuality that have shaped our views of identity over the last century.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

GER 275 DIGITAL CITYSCAPES

Most of our interactions today with the geography of a city are digitial - we use our phones to find a location, we mark where we've been on a Facebook map, we embed GPS information into our photos. Beyond these everyday uses, digital projects abound that map historical and statistical data onto geographical locations, drawing connections between physical locations and more abstract information. In this course we will examine the ways these interactions between the digital and the physical shape our understanding of the world around us.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 282 FASSBINDER

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

GER 283 CINEMA & REVOLUTION: WEST GERMAN AVANT-GARDE

This course will explore the relationship between film and revolution in West German cinema from 1965 to the present. We will consider cinema's potential as a revolutionary medium, while also focusing on how revolution is thematized and constructed in both fiction and documentary films. The course will engage with issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, recreating the cinema as a revolutionary artistic form, feminism as a revolutionary perspective, the domestic sphere as a revolutionary space, and the co-optation of the cinema's revolutionary potential through mass consumption.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

GER 284 HOLLYWOOD BEHIND THE WALL: INTRODUCTION TO EAST GERMAN CINEMA

This course will explore major developments in the East German cinema, including issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, popular filmmaking and art cinema, cinema as a pedagogical tool, artistic dissent and state censorship, socialist ideologies of gender, and the politics of documentary. Each film will be explored in relation to its socio-historical context, providing students with an overview of East German film and culture.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 285 MEN OF MARBLE, WOMEN OF STEEL: AN INTRODUCTION TO EAST EUROPEAN FILM

This course will provide a general introduction to the history, artistry and politics of East European film. We will begin by considering the place of East European film in the context of contemporary film studies and the industry structure of state socialist film making. We will then explore individual films from a regional (not national) perspective, considering how they confront issues such as the burden of history and ethics, the tensions between modernity and tradition, the struggle between creativity and censorship, as well as the reluctant feminism of state socialism and representations of gender and sexuality.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

GER 286 NEW AUSTRIAN CINEMA

In this course, we will focus on recent developments in Austrian cinema. Not unlike other cinematic “new waves,” Austria’s artists politically and aesthetically resist the petit-bourgeois mindset of their fellow citizens. Considered within the national/European context of “official” Austria and its long avoidance of dealing with its fascist past, and within a global context of the post-modern “state of exception,” new Austrian film offers viewers a spectatorial position from which to consider the “society of control” (Foucault/Deleuze/Hardt). Beginning with the avant-garde works of VALIE EXPORT, this course will emphasize works by Barbara Albert, Florian Flicker, Michael Glawogger, Michael Haneke, Stefan Ruzowitzky, Ulrich Seidl, Peter Tscherkassky, and Valeska Grisebach.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 287 NAZI CULTURE

This course uses the films of the Third Reich to examine the parameters of Nazi culture. It examines such diverse aspects as the Leader Principle, gender roles, racial hygiene, anti-Semitism, mass culture, propaganda, and visions of history. Films are analyzed both in terms of their aesthetics as well as the social and historical context of their production.

GER 288 MOTHERS, COMRADES & WHORES

In this course we will explore representations of women in post-World War II German cinema. Moving chronologically from the building of two German states to the post-unification period, we will consider the constantly shifting meaning of 'woman' in popular and avant-garde films, narrative and documentary films, films by both male and female directors. We will consider equally films from East and West Germany. How does 'woman' function as a narrative device in these films? Do women behind the camera change 'woman's' meaning within the film? Can 'woman' consistently be reduced to one narrative trope (mother, comrade or whore), or does she resist? All readings and discussions are in English; all films are subtitled.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

GER 290 AVANT GARDE FILM

No description

GER 291 WEIMAR CULTURE

During the Weimar period (1918-1933), Germany was the center of many innovations in the arts, literature, film and architecture. Looking at various movements such as Expressionism and New Objectivity, this course will explore the connections between social change and art. The texts and discussions will be in English; German 200 or its equivalent in a prerequisite.

Last Offered: Spring 2012

GER 292 ENVIRONMENTAL DECISIONS

No description

GER 294 ON GENEALOGY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 392 PRACTICUM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 393 SENIOR PROJECT

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 394 INTERNSHIP

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 395 HONORS RESEARCH

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 399 PRACTICUM IN GERMAN

No description

GER 404 MARX & MARXISM

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 405 NIETZSCHE & NIETZSCHEANS

Friedrich Nietzsche continues to be one of the most influential modern philosophers, yet controversy surrounds almost every aspect of his life and work. This course will help students go beyond the controversy in order to consider Nietzsche's texts discerningly and how he approached the problems of truth, power, and morality. Close examination of his most important writings will be complemented by inquiry into Nietzsche's effects on twentieth-century philosophy. Other thinkers include Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, Sarah Kofman, Jacques Derrida and Giles Deleuze.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

GER 406 FREUD AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

Freud is one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. His ground-breaking work on dreams, the Oedipus Complex, and psychoanalytic method have profoundly changed our understanding of the psyche and social interaction. This course provides a basic survey of Freud’s most important and often controversial writings/discoveries within their historcial context and with regards to significant criticisms of his work. “Freud: An Introduction” is part of a cluster which includes courses of Marx and Nietzsche (these courses need not be taken in any particular order) Additionally majors and minors can sign up for GER 211 where significant texts will be read and discussed in German.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

GER 409 ON GENEALOGY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 411 JEWISH WRITER & REBEL

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

GER 412 MONSTERS,GHOSTS & ALIENS

This course focuses on the horror genre as popular entertainment in Germany, England, and the US in the 19th and 20th centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of "others" as monsters in literature and film (Frankenstein, Vampires, Devils, Aliens, etc.). Authors/filmmakers include: Hoffmann, Poe,  Shelley, Stoker, Jackson, Rice, Harris, King, Murnau, Jordan, Wise, Siegel, Kubrick, Demme, . This course is part of the Horror in Literature & Film Cluster.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

GER 414 FAIRY TALES, MYTHS & LEGENDS

Grimm's fairy tales to urban legends, this course will examine the stories we love to tell ourselves. They horrify us and, yet, strangely comfort us as well. What is it that causes this effect? How do these tales help us shape the world around us? This course is part of the humanities cluster "Horror in Literature and Film." It is designed to familiarize students with the tools of cultural studies.

Last Offered: Spring 2011

GER 415 BERLIN: TALES OF A CITY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

GER 416 Dungeons & Dragons: Myths and Legends in German Literature

With the recent revival of Wagner’s Ring Cycle at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, the continued popularity of J.R.R. Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings novels and recent film adaptations of Beowulf and Tristan and Isolde , it’s easy to see that people still regularly like to “get medieval”. In this course we’re going to look at the German origins of these modern texts by reading the original source material: The Nibelungenlied , Parzival , Tristan as well as many other important medieval works. We will also look at modern variations on those texts, from Wagner and Tolkein to modern role-playing and video games that use the medieval period as their settings.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

GER 418 AND NOW... DEEP THOUGHTS WITH GERMAN-JEWISH THINKERS!

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 419 WEIMAR CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

GER 420 SEX & GENDER: 18TH C REP

This course explores 18th century conceptions/constructions of the body, sexuality, and gender as manifest in medical papers, handbooks, aesthetic essays, and literary works to include Lessing’s Laocoon and Philotas, Fielding’s The Female Husband, Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Cleland’s Fanny Hill, de Sade’s Justine, Goethe’s Gotz von Berlichingen, Kleist’s Holy Caecilia and Puppet Theater, Diderot’s The Nun, Shelley’s Frankenstein. Additional theoretical readings include: Foucault, Kristeva, Butler, Sedgwick, Gilman, Habermas, Cassirer, Todorov, Laqueur, and G.S. Rousseau.

GER 421 GENDER, LOVE, AND FAMILIES

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 429 KAFKA & HIS WORLD

This course explores the weird, dreamlike, eerie, and inexplicable world of Kafka’s writings. In Kafka’s stories dogs conduct investigations, apes report to academies, men turn into bugs, the Statue of Liberty holds up a sword, and arrests occur without explanation as all expectations and assurances about the “rules” of existence, thought, and social order come into question. In this course we will read texts such as: The Trial, The Metamorphosis, Amerika, The Castle, Investigations of a Dog, A Report to an Academy, In the Penal Colony, and A Hunger Artist. This course is taught in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 430 POE AND HOFFMANN: UNCANNY STORIES

This course explores the beginnings of the horror and detective genres in the 19th century. Particular attention is devoted to the narrative structure, tropes, and psychological content of the strange tales by Poe and Hoffmann. Theories of horror are also addressed to include discussions by lessing, Todorov, Huet, and Kristeva. NOTE: THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

Last Offered: Fall 2016

GER 431 GERMAN JEWS

Jews have lived in Germany since the Middle Ages and have contributed a great deal to German Culture, as well as developing unique German Jewish cultures; these facts are often overshadowed by the tragic events of World War II. In this seminar we will explore the rich and diverse German Jewish cultures of nineteenth and twentieth centuries in a range of texts including fiction, travel texts, philosophical and historical writings. Topics will include the Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment), assimilation, Zionism, anti-Semitism and the relationship between East and West European Jews. Readings and discussions in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

GER 434 STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 437 AFTER THE WALL

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

GER 446 WALKING ON YOUR HEAD:WRITING VERTIGO IN GERMAN LIT AND PHILOSOPHY

Beginning in the 18th century a new question arises with regard to the subject’s orientation in thought. However, almost as soon as this orientation has taken place, its double, vertigo, appears as a pathological inversion of the overly subjective interpretation of truth. This double, which haunts the last two centuries of thought, ultimately empties the subject of all content. Although this de-centering of the subject does produce a compensatory relief from certain social constraints, it is not always easily controlled. In this course we will read a series of texts that deal with this problem of vertigo.

GER 447 HOLOCAUST: AFFECT AND ABSENCE

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

GER 448 ON THE MOVE:TRAV,WANDRS&EXPL

This course covers a wide variety of texts in which mobility plays a central role, including films, cultural theory and fiction. The time period we cover will be from the nineteenth century to the present day. Some of the questions we will explore are: What are the reasons people move from one place to another? Who controls the movement and how? How do texts allow us as viewers and readers travel? Texts and discussions are in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

GER 449 BESTSELLERS OF THE NEW GEN

This course explores the surging popularity in Germany of short stories and novels written by young women writers of the New Generation. These literary works strive to depict contemporary German lifestyles and particularly those of young people in cities like Berlin. Class taught in German.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

GER 452 BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY

The city in film and literature is never just a physical space - discourses of modernity and urban life are mapped onto real and imagines urban spaces. In this course we will explore how the relationship between the spaces of the city and the stories told about and through them shape our understanding of urban life. Some of the texts we will examine are: Fritz Lang’s M, Arthur Schnitzler’s Dream Story, and Lloyd Bacon’s 42nd Street.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 456 GERMANY YEAR ZERO

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

GER 460 TRUTH & POWER

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

GER 461 WEIMAR FILM & FILM THEORY

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 462 STRANGERS

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 472 GENDER & SEXUALITY

This course will examine literary, artistic, and theoretical representations of gender and sexuality as they have changed in the course of the 20 Century. The focus will be on texts from Western Europe and the US, but we will also consider other perspectives. From the New Women to French Feminists and transnational feminism. from homophile societies to “queer nation and gay marriage, from Sigmund Freud to Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, we will explore the contested and politically charged debates around gender and sexuality that have shaped our views of identity over the last century.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

GER 475 DIGITAL CITYSCAPES

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

GER 478 WEIMAR CULTURE

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Last Offered: Spring 2012

GER 482 FASSBINDER

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

GER 483 CINEMA & REVOLUTION: WEST GERMAN AVANT-GARDE

This course will explore the relationship between film and revolution in West German cinema from 1965 to the present. We will consider cinema¿s potential as a revolutionary medium, while also focusing on how revolution is thematized and constructed in both fiction and documentary films. The course will engage with issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, recreating the cinema as a revolutionary artistic form, feminism as a revolutionary perspective, the domestic sphere as a revolutionary space, and the co-optation of the cinemas revolutionary potential through mass consumption.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

GER 484 HOLLYWOOD BEHIND THE WALL: An Introduction to East German Cinema

This course will explore major developments in the East German cinema, including issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, popular filmmaking and art cinema, cinema as a pedagogical tool, artistic dissent and state censorship, socialist ideologies of gender, and the politics of documentary. Each film will be explored in relation to its socio-historical context, providing students with an overview of East German film and culture.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 485 Men of Marble, Women of Steel: An Introduction to East European Film

This course will provide a general introduction to the history, artistry and politics of East European film. We will begin by considering the place of East European film in the context of contemporary film studies and the industry structure of state socialist film making. We will then explore individual films from a regional (not national) perspective, considering how they confront issues such as the burden of history and ethics, the tensions between modernity and tradition, the struggle between creativity and censorship, as well as the reluctant feminism of state socialism and representations of gender and sexuality.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

GER 486 NEW AUSTRIAN CINEMA

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

GER 488 NEW GERMAN CINEMA

It is common now to hear that we live in a transnational age, but what does this really mean? How do we imagine our transnational community? In this course we will examine contemporary transformations from national to trans-national culture by focusing precisely on film production. This course will examine how film provides one of the central sources of transnational images. Germany will provide us with a case study and we will view a wide variety of German and European, national and transnational films. Through this case study we will address larger questions of globalization. Through hot new cult films like "Run, Lola Run," or big budget epics like "House of the Spirits," we will examine the aesthetic and technical transformations that have given rise to these new ways of imagining our community. PLEASE NOTE: Attendance at weekly film screening is mandatory -- alternative time will be set up.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

GER 491 MASTER'S READING IN GERMAN

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 492 PRACTICUM

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 495 MASTER'S RESEARCH IN GERMAN

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 584 HOLLYWOOD BEHIND THE WALL

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

GER 588 MOTHERS, COMRADES & WHORES

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Last Offered: Fall 2013

GER 890 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE - MA

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Last Offered: Summer 2011

GER 895 CONT OF MASTER'S ENROLLMENT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 899 MASTER'S DISSERTATION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 985 LEAVE OF ABSENCE

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

GER 990 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE

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Last Offered: Summer 2011