Undergraduate Program

Comparative Literature Courses

Below is a list of recently offered undergraduate courses. Not all of these courses are offered in any given year, and there may be other courses offered some years. Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.

CLT 101 TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

An introduction to the study of literature and culture in a comparative and theoretical context. Close critical scrutiny of cultural difference as manifested in a variety of literary texts and cultural phenomena. Topics vary and include Historical and Imaginary Paris; Barcelona and the Cultures of the Mediterranean; Cowboys and Indians; Mexico City, Global Metropolis; Napoleon: Image, Myth, History.

CLT 101B BARCELONA AND MEDITERRANEAN CULTURES

Five short papers; final paper. This course examines the long and complex culture and history of Barcelona, from its orgins as a Roman military outpost through two millennia of fiercely independent culture to its modern incarnation as one of Mediterranean Europe’s most dynamic international cities. Taught in English. Written work in Spanish for SP 290 credit.

CLT 101C DISABILITY STUDIES: RETHINKING DIFFERENCE & DIVERSITY

People with disabilities constitute the world’s largest, most stigmatized, and most marginalized “minority,” and yet many of us don’t include this identity in our thinking when we speak of and celebrate human diversity and inclusion. The field of disability studies has, since the 1980s, examined and theorized the complex meanings of disability throughout history. Work by DS scholars offers insights into disability identities as both embodied realities, and social and cultural constructions. This course will provide an introduction to disability studies, and an exploration of the literary representations of physical, intellectual and psychosocial disability in works chosen from a variety of national traditions. Reading journal, short essays, research paper.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 101D MEXICO, DF: GLOBAL METROPOLIS

Called by some “the capital of the 221st century,” Greater Mexico City is inhabited by close to 20 million people. The Distrito Federal (DF) and capital of Mexico is today the largest metroopolitan area in the western hemisphere and third largest city in the world by population. Established by the Spanish in 1524 on the ruins of the Aztec city Tenochtitlán they had destroyed, Mexico City is a global center of finance, culture, and industry. This course examines the development of this vibrant megalopolis over the 20th and 21st centuries using literature, film, politics, tourism, music and the arts, cultural geography, architectural space, and essays by urban wanderers to try and get a handle on a space that seems to contradict itself at every turn.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 101E Censorship

This course will examine the concept of censorship as well as its application throughout history. Examples will be taken from the literature, film, art (among others) of different cultural traditions and from a variety of historical contexts. We will explore the logistics of controlling material that is considered unsuitable for public consumption as well as the implications of the desire and attempts to control knowledge and freedom of expression. Students will be exposed to some controversial materials throughout the semester.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 101G HISTORICAL & IMAGINARY PARIS

Why has Paris captivated the world's political, intellectual, social, and artistic imagination for millenia? This course examines Paris as a cultural and urban phenomenon.

CLT 101I COWBOYS & INDIANS

What makes a Western a Western? Is it cowboys and Indians and vistas of the American West? Is is a Western if tough guy Clint Eastwood stars in a film by an Italian director shot in Spain? Or if a German who had never been to the United States writes about the heroic Indian Winnetou and the film versions of the novels are shot in Eastern Europe? This course will explore the myth of the American West in film and literature, including Westerns from Germany, Asia, and of course, the US. Texts and discussions will be in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 101M BERLIN: TALES OF A CITY

Who or what defines a city? Do architecture, cultural productions and politics distinguish it, or is it characterized by the banal activities at work, in the home, or in the public gardens? In this course we will encounter Berlin in the visual arts, literature, and film, as well as in historical and philosophical texts. Questions of gender, class, race and sexuality will enable us to approach the city from various perspective so as to better understand it as both a site of and metaphor for artistic production, philosophical reflection, political engagement and banal existence. All readings and discussions in ENGLISH. Freshmen and sophomores especially encouraged.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 101V POWERS OF IMAGES

It’s a truism that we live in a world saturated with images, but anxieties over images are hardly unique to our own time. Images have been ongoing subjects of reflection for centuries, while the stories literary texts tell about images are particularly revealing of beliefs in the powers and limits of both writing and visual images, and of the ways in which such beliefs are almost invariably intertwined with questions of knowledge and power, the borders of life and death, and the politics of gender, history, and culture. In this course, we will examine how literature from China, Japan, Turkey, and the West explores such questions of images. We will track how understandings of the powers of images change, persist, and are re-appropriated across historical time and cultural space, and consider the critical light “premodern” texts and texts from our “modern” world of images can project upon each other.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 101Z POWER OF POPULAR CULTURE

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CLT 110 JUSTICE AND EQUALITY

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Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 111 PRE-MODERN CHI LITERATURE

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 111Q SPANISH AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS

Through study of texts (mostly novels) written by women from Spanish America, we will ask broad questions concerning cultural contexts with respect to sexuality and gender, language, aesthetics, psychology, and social issues. The course will use materials from a variety of fields (literary and cultural theory, history, sociology, anthropology, feminist studies) in addition to the primary texts. Emphasis on collaborative research and progressive writing assignments. Campus visit by one of the authors planned. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 260 only
Last Offered: Fall 2012

CLT 113Q TOLSTOY'S WAR & PEACE

A semester-long exploration of the world of War and Peace. Besides a close analysis of the novel, we read two important short works by Tolstoy and excerpts from historical accounts. We also view Russian, American and British attempts to film the novel. In English.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

CLT 114Q GREAT CITIES: EDO 1600-1850

Edo (modern Tokyo) began around 1600 as the shogun’s administrative center for all Japan. For centuries only a tiny fishing port, Edo quickly became a bustling and picturesque urban center, and by 1750 was the largest city in the world. This course examines Edo as historical, political, urban, social, religious, and artistic artifact, exploring the various forces contributing to the creation and shaping of the city, to discover how people lived in and understood this novel environment. The course is taught in English.

CLT 116 DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART I. "INFERNO" AND "PURGATORIO"

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 116Q DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART I. "INFERNO" AND "PURGATORIO"

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Last Offered: Fall 2012

CLT 117 DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART II. "PURGATORIO" AND "PARADISO"

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 117Q DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART II. "PURGATORIO" AND "PARADISO"

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 118 THE DIVINE COMEDY OF DANTE ALIGHIERI: DISCOVER THE WONDERS OF A MEDIEVAL MIND

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 118Q THE DIVINE COMEDY OF DANTE ALIGHIERI: DISCOVER THE WONDERS OF A MEDIEVAL MIND

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 151 MODERN LATIN AMERICA

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 160 THE NEW EUROPE: FORMATIONS & TRANSFORMATIONS

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 161 EUROPE TODAY

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 200 ITALIAN PHILOSOPHY 1922-1945

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Last Offered: Spring 2012

CLT 201A PRE-MODERN CHI LITERATURE

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 202B HOLOCAUST: AFFECT AND ABSENCE

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 203 POLISH AND AMERICAN POETRY

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Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 204 MODERN JAPAN

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 205 LATIN-AMERICAN FILM

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 205A CONTEMPORARY FRENCH CULTURE

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive view of French Contemporary culture through major trends of French cultural, political, and intellectual life in the recent years. While we cannot study factual representations of French culture, we will attempt to establish a conceptual framework that would help us in the understanding of complex questions such as What does it mean to be French?, What is France? What is French culture?, etc.

CLT 205B FRANCOPHONE CULTURES

Francophone cultures involves the study of discourses produced by the imperial France on the colonized or former Colonized, and the impact of colonization or decolonization in French modern culture. The study of Francophone texts introduces students to one of the most dynamic aspect of “Cultures in French.” The course will finally, in the light of multiculturalism, attempt to look at ways and means that might lead to a better understanding of France’s standing in the World today. By exposing students to a broad range of ideas, to the relativity of all cultural representations, this course hopes to introduce them to the complexities of cultural diversity and to challenge stereotypical perceptions of French culture.

CLT 206 CROSS READINGS:SP&LATIN AMER

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CLT 207B ITALY: A CULTURAL MOSAIC

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Last Offered: Fall 2010

CLT 207C History—Italy from Napoleon to the First Republic (1796-1948): History & Historical Imagination

The Italian peninsula has a history that goes back at least 2500 years. But the state of Italy, founded in 1861, is younger than the United States. At the intersection of these two facts lies the main theme of our journey from the Napoleonic invasion of Italy to the approval of the constitution of the Republic of Italy: the difficulty faced by the political leaders of united Italy in getting its citizens to identify with the Italian state. Historical accounts and documents, integrated with a selection of literary, operatic, and cinematic materials, constitute the main sources of information and analysis.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 208 SAMURA CULTURE

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CLT 208A TRADITIONAL JPN CULTURE

An overview of Japan¿s traditional culture through the most prominent examples of it visual, literary, and performing arts, with attention to the social contexts of aesthetic experience and to ideas of a ¿national culture.¿ Taught in English, additional work available in Japanese where appropriate.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 208C CONTEMPORARY JPN CULTURE

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 209A RUSSIAN CIVILIZATION

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Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 209B RUSSIAN IDENTITY

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 210 HAYAO MIYAZAKI AND PLANET GHIBLI

A course on the work of the animated films of Hayao Miyazaki, the world view and visual sensibilities of his creation, Studio Ghibli, and anime as film form and cultural phenomenon. Focusing on Miyazaki’s films, we will examine the "nuts and bolts" of animated cinematic construction (use of narrative space, character design, etc.); methods of adaptation, influence, and genre variation; anime reception and fan culture; and issues of race, gender, landscape, identity and cultural conscience. Such detailed analysis reveals the range and possibilities of anime and its place in popular culture on a local and global scale.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 210B POWER OF POPULAR CULTURE

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CLT 210C CHINESE LANDSCAPES

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 210E CUBA AT A CROSROADS

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CLT 210W MIYAZAKI & GHIBLI

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 211B FRENCH CINEMA: THE NEW WAVE

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 211C HISTORY OF FRENCH CINEMA

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 211D CONTEMPORARY FRENCH FILM

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Last Offered: Fall 2012

CLT 211E FILMING/WRITING POSTCOL WOMEN

This course will explore the Postcolonial Woman Condition in films and novels produced by African andCaribbean female directors and writers. Capturing the complex destinies of African and Caribbean women, challenging the machismo that is inscribed in cultural and social fabrics of their communities, exploring creative and daring venues that may mobilize energies for women liberation are constitutive of postcolonial women filmmaking and writing traditions, from the framing of the deferred dream or the Saaraba poetics to the Community- oriented camera. The course interrogates the paradoxes of the African filmmaking/writing traditions, especially itsvreliance on western expertise and languages, financing and sometimes audiences to exist. From diasporic connections to street children, from anticolonial struggles to postcolonial disillusionments, from genital mutilations to Aids, from incest to rape, this course is addressed to students of French studies, Women studies and Film studies.

CLT 211F CLASSICAL FILM THEORY

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 211G FEMINIST FILM THEORY

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 211J FILMS OF JEAN-LUC GODARD

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Last Offered: Spring 2012

CLT 211M FRENCH IN FILM

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 212A MONSTERS, GHOSTS & ALIENS

This course focuses on the horror genre as popular entertainment in Germany, England, and the US in the 19th and 20th centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of "others" as monsters in literature and film (Frankenstein, Vampires, Devils, Aliens, etc.). Authors/filmmakers include: Hoffmann, Poe,  Shelley, Stoker, Jackson, Rice, Harris, King, Murnau, Jordan, Wise, Siegel, Kubrick, Demme, . This course is part of the Horror in Literature & Film Cluster.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

CLT 212C NEW GERMAN CINEMA

In this course we will explore representations of women in post-World War II German cinema. Moving chronologically from the building of two German states to the post-unification period, we will consider the constantly shifting meaning of , woman in popular and avant-garde films, narrative and documentary films, films by both male and female directors. We will consider equally films from East and West Germany. How does woman function as a narrative device in these films? Do women behind the camera change, woman’s meaning within the film? Can woman consistently be reduced to one narrative trope (mother, comrade or whore), or does she resist? All readings and discussions are in English; all films are subtitled.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 212H FAIRY TALES, MYTHS & LEGENDS

Grimm's fairy tales to urban legends, this course will examine the stories we love to tell ourselves. They horrify us and, yet, strangely comfort us as well. What is it that causes this effect? How do these tales help us shape the world around us? This course is part of the humanities cluster "Horror in Literature and Film." It is designed to familiarize students with the tools of cultural studies.

Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 212I CINEMA & REVOLUTION

This course will explore the relationship between film and revolution in West German cinema from 1965 to the present. We will consider cinema¿s potential as a revolutionary medium, while also focusing on how revolution is thematized and constructed in both fiction and documentary films. The course will engage with issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, recreating the cinema as a revolutionary artistic form, feminism as a revolutionary perspective, the domestic sphere as a revolutionary space, and the co-optation of the cinemas revolutionary potential through mass consumption.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 212M INTRO TO EAST GERMAN CINEMA

This course will explore major developments in the East German cinema, including issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, popular film making and art cinema, cinema as a pedagogical tool, artistic dissent and state censorship, socialist ideologies of gender, and the politics of documentary. Each film will be explored in relation to its socio-historical context, providing students with an overview of East German film and culture.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 213B MODERN ITALY THRU FILM

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 214 DREAM OF THE RED CHAMBER

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 214A TOURIST JAPAN

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 214B MOBSTERS, MONTERS & SWORDS

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CLT 214C AKIRA KUROSAWA

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 214E JAPANESE ANIMATION (ANIME)

An exploration of Japanese popular culture through the world of anime. Films cover a wide range of subgenres, from Hayao Miyazaki’s The Castle of Cagliostro to more recent works including Akira (cyberpunk), Silent Mobius, and Neo-Tokyo (futuristic manga adaptations), Robot Carnival (battling robots, androids), Grave of the Fireflies (postwar nostalgia). Discussions address issues of landscape (city vs. “furusato”), period, fantasy, gender (male, female, androgyne), racism (self vs. other), cultural anxiety. Screenings are held in tandem with an anime series at the George Eastman House. Class taught in English with additional instruction in Japanese as required for majors.

CLT 214G JAPANESE NEW WAVE

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Last Offered: Fall 2010

CLT 214H NAGISA OSHIMA:

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CLT 214M ATOMIC CREATURES: GODZILLA

Origins and development of the Japanese kaiju eiga (monster film): nuclear imagery and the science fiction/horror/creature film genre.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 214N TOURIST JAPAN

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 214W ATOMIC CREATURES: GODZILLA

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 215A RUSSIA GOES TO MOVIES

In Russia, the dawning of the age of movies coincided with the birth of the Soviet state. According to Lenin, the most revolutionary of the arts was also to be the art of the Revolution. Yet Soviet directors, from Eisenstein to Tarkovsky, were also among the world’s most influential filmmakers.This class looks at these artistically interesting and popular films while exploring the changing relationship between politics, experimentation, and entertainment in Russian cinema, always mindful of the backdrop of totalitarian society and the nature of mass culture in general. Topics include Innovation and Ideology; From Hollywood to High Stalinism; Popular Patriotism; The Thaw in Cinema after Stalin’s Death; From High Hopes to Stagnation (the sixties and seventies); The Last Days of Soviet Film and the New Russian Cinema. No knowledge of Russian required. Attendance at weekly screenings is mandatory.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 216A MEXICAN FILM

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 216B SPANISH FILM

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 216C WOMEN IN HISPANIC FILM

Examine images of women in a variety of films from Latin America and Spain. Topics range from the use of "the feminine" in war propaganda, to films of the Franco dictatorship, and from Latin American political documentaries to popular commercial films. Emphasis on cinematic representation as visual ideology, and on films at the millennium. Class taught in English. Written work in Spanish for SP credit.

CLT 217 Men of Marble, Women of Steel: An Introduction to East European Film

This course will provide a general introduction to the history, artistry and politics of East European film. We will begin by considering the place of East European film in the context of contemporary film studies and the industry structure of state socialist film making. We will then explore individual films from a regional (not national) perspective, considering how they confront issues such as the burden of history and ethics, the tensions between modernity and tradition, the struggle between creativity and censorship, as well as the reluctant feminism of state socialism and representations of gender and sexuality.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 217B RACE & GENDER IN POP FILM

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 218 FILM HISTORY: 1929-1959

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 219 BUNUEL & CO.

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CLT 220 ARCH OF PERU

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Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 221 MUTILATED BODIES

'Transnational sisterhood' or cultural imperialism? Legitimate ritualized practice or outdated violent ritual? Genital cutting, female circumcision, female genital surgery? The controversy over this practice already begins with the act of its naming. If there seems to be a consensus about the physical violence imposed on the female body, why is it that western feminist discourse is suspected of perpetuating the mutilation African voices? This course seeks to provide an understanding of the context in which a fragmented 'transnational sisterhood' allows for a proliferation of mutilated discourses on mutilated postcolonial bodies. Readings and Films include Alice Walker (Warrior Marks), Florence Ayissi Fauziya Kassindja (Do They Hear You When You Cry), Maryse Conde and more critical and theoretical readings from African, French and North American authors. In English.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 221A SICILY ON SCREEN

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CLT 222A SEXUALITY AND GENDER: 18TH CENTURY REPRESENTATION

This course explores 18th century conceptions/constructions of the body, sexuality, and gender as manifest in medical papers, handbooks, aesthetic essays, and literary works to include Lessing’s Laocoon and Philotas, Fielding’s The Female Husband, Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Cleland’s Fanny Hill, de Sade’s Justine, Goethe’s Gotz von Berlichingen, Kleist’s Holy Caecilia and Puppet Theater, Diderot’s The Nun, Shelley’s Frankenstein. Additional theoretical readings include: Foucault, Kristeva, Butler, Sedgwick, Gilman, Habermas, Cassirer, Todorov, Laqueur, and G.S. Rousseau.

CLT 222B GENDER & SEXUALITY

This course will examine literary, artistic, and theoretical representations of gender and sexuality as they have changed in the course of the 20 Century. The focus will be on texts from Western Europe and the US, but we will also consider other perspectives. From the New Women to French Feminists and transnational feminism. from homophile societies to “queer nation and gay marriage, from Sigmund Freud to Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, we will explore the contested and politically charged debates around gender and sexuality that have shaped our views of identity over the last century.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 222C GENDER LOVE & FAMILIES

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 223 AND NOW... DEEP THOUGHTS WITH GERMAN-JEWISH THINKERS!

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 224A JAPANESE WOMEN WRITERS

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CLT 224B MODERN JPN WOMEN WRITERS

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 226D SPANISH AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS

Through study of texts (mostly novels) written by women from Spanish America, we will ask broad questions concerning cultural contexts with respect to sexuality and gender, language, aesthetics, psychology, and social issues. The course will use materials from a variety of fields (literary and cultural theory, history, sociology, anthropology, feminist studies) in addition to the primary texts. Emphasis on collaborative research and progressive writing assignments. Campus visit by one of the authors planned. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 260 only
Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 227 BODY POLITICS

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 228 ITALY NAPOLEON-FIRST REPUBLC

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Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 229 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN LIT

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 230 FILM AS OBJECT

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 230A FRENCH SOCIAL THOUGHT

This course examines the singular contribution of French thinkers to the development of the social sciences (or the “sciences of man,” as they are known in France) in the twentieth century. We will examine the theory of gift exchange in Marcel Mauss, the rise of structural anthropology in Claude Lévi-Strauss, the sociology of Pierre Bourdieu, and the theories of religion and culture of René Girard and Marcel Gauchet. We will also study post-structuralist thinkers such as Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Nancy when their work touches on issues of society and religion. Taught in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 231 AFRICAN NOVEL: ITS THEORY AND ITS CONTEXTS

This course is a study of the Francophone African Novel from North Sub-Saharan African, and from Madagascar. The course will explore the political and cultural contexts that gave rise to the modern African literature in gerneral, and to the modern Afraican Novel in particular.

CLT 231B MADNESS & POST COLONIAL LITERATURE

This course will explore inscriptions of madness in post-colonial African and Caribbean texts. Beyond the obvious and visible signs of what is generally termed "madness" (from the pathological to the political or cultural), we will ask ourselves if the postcolonial arena cannot be interpreted as a pervasive manifestation of madness, that is to say, of something fundamentally "alien, foreign" to the Known, to the imperial destructuring order, and to the disarticulated colonial and post-independent communities. By bringing together texts from different and diverse cultural and intellectual areas such as France, Guadeloupe, and Africa, we seek to confront the various "scriptures." Issues of witch-hunt, of disintegration of Juletane, the Antillean women in West Africa, from Foucault's normative panopticism to Fanon's discussion of the black experience, the postcolonial situation, articulated or silenced, will be the focus of this course. Taught in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 231E BLACK PARIS

This course is a study of Black Paris, as imagined by three generations of Black cultural producers from the United States, the Caribbean and Africa. Paris is as a space of freedom and artistic glory that African American writers, solders and artists were denied back home. For colonized fricans, and Antilleans, Paris was the birthace of the Negritude, the cultural renaissance informed by the dreams and teachings of the Harlem Renaissance. Black Paris, for the young generations caught in the marginal space of poor suburbs, calls to mind images of burning cars, riots, dilapidated schools that are rendered through rap music, hip-hop that are weaving the thread of a new youth-oriented transnational imagination.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 231F FOUCAULT & ETHICS

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 232 JEWISH WRITER & REBEL

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 233 MEDIUM&MATERIALITY IN CHI

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Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 234 PARIS:CAPITAL OF THE 19TH C

Course studies how Paris became the archetypal modern city. Examination of literary forms especially attuned to depicting the new urban realities, such as the realist novel and Baudelaire’s poetry, as well as paintings, illustrations, and photographs. Hassmann’s spatial and architectural transformation of the city during the second half of the 19th century. Walter Benjamin’s writings on Paris analyzed in light of recent work by cultural historians. In English.

CLT 235 TEXTS BEYOND BORDERS

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 236B US LATINOS/LATINAS

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a writing and culture in its rich geographic and ethnic diversity; Latinization of the American landscape; exile, immigration, cultural syncretism.

CLT 237 FLORENCE THE WONDEROUS

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 238 CONTEMPORARY POETRY

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Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 239 REPRESENTING AFR-AMERICANS

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 240 GERMAN JEWS

Jews have lived in Germany since the Middle Ages and have contributed a great deal to German Culture, as well as developing unique German Jewish cultures; these facts are often overshadowed by the tragic events of World War II. In this seminar we will explore the rich and diverse German Jewish cultures of nineteenth and twentieth centuries in a range of texts including fiction, travel texts, philosophical and historical writings. Topics will include the Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment), assimilation, Zionism, anti-Semitism and the relationship between East and West European Jews. Readings and discussions in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

CLT 241 CARIBBEAN NOVEL & THEORY

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 241A PERFORMANCE STUDIES

Study of major authors of the French Enlightenment, as well as their predecessors and contemporaries, including Marivaux, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Prevost, Rousseau, Diderot, Sade, and Laclos.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 241H THE FRANCOPHONE NOVEL

A survey of the Francophone literary world (Quebec, North Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean, etc.) in an effort to identify traits and common characteristics of these regions. We will attempt a critical analysis of selected works by well-known Francophone writers and their portrayal of issues such as poverty, religion, culture, politics and the impact of France assimilation.

CLT 241I CARIBBEAN NOVEL & THEORY

This course is a study of major Caribbean novels and major theoretical texts. The reading will be structured around the notion of “Antillanite” or Creolization elaborated by Martinican Edouard Glissant and his heirs Chamoiseau and Confiant of the “Creolite” movement. The controversial presence of the Other (Africa and France) in the Caribbean, the need to build a Caribbean authenticity in order to participate freely in what Glisant Glissant terms “Relation planetaire” (Planetary Relations) will also be thoroughly examined.

CLT 241M THE EARLY EUROPEAN NOVELS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

CLT 242A POE & HOFFMANN

This course explores the beginnings of the horror and detective genres in the 19th century. Particular attention is devoted to the narrative structure, tropes, and psychological content of the strange tales by Poe and Hoffmann. Theories of horror are also addressed to include discussions by lessing, Todorov, Huet, and Kristeva. NOTE: THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 243 WIZARDS, MAGIC AND FANTASY

This course traces the development of the fantasy literature genre from ETA Hoffman’s The Golden Pot to JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Particular attention is devoted to the tropes and structures of fantasy narratives as they offer the reader an escape from a mundane or threatening world and provide intricate social critiques. Topics addressed include: wizards, witches, talking cats, flights of fantasy, new worlds, and social consructions of work, class, others, families, mothers, fathers, masculinity, femininity etc. Authors include: Hoffmann, Rowling, Shelley, Orwell, Tolkien, Kafka, Atwood etc.

CLT 244A TOPICS IN ITALIAN CULTURE (4.0 CREDITS)

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 244B TOPICS IN ITALIAN CULTURE (2.0 CREDITS)

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 246B FACING FACTS:NON-FICTN WRTNG

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Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 246C 1492 AND BEYOND

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 247 POLITICS AND CULTURE IN FASCIST ITALY

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 248 JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE

This course covers a wide variety of texts in which mobility plays a central role, including films, cultural theory and fiction. The time period we cover will be from the nineteenth century to the present day. Some of the questions we will explore are: What are the reasons people move from one place to another? Who controls the movement and how? How do texts allow us as viewers and readers travel? Texts and discussions are in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

CLT 249 Dungeons & Dragons: Myths and Legends in German Literature

With the recent revival of Wagner’s Ring Cycle at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, the continued popularity of J.R.R. Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings novels and recent film adaptations of Beowulf and Tristan and Isolde, it’s easy to see that people still regularly like to “get medieval”. In this course we’re going to look at the German origins of these modern texts by reading the original source material: The Nibelungenlied, Parzival, Tristan as well as many other important medieval works. We will also look at modern variations on those texts, from Wagner and Tolkein to modern role-playing and video games that use the medieval period as their settings.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

CLT 250 NABOKOV

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 251 STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 252 BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY

The city in film and literature is never just a physical space - discourses of modernity and urban life are mapped onto real and imagines urban spaces. In this course we will explore how the relationship between the spaces of the city and the stories told about and through them shape our understanding of urban life. Some of the texts we will examine are: Fritz Lang’s M, Arthur Schnitzler’s Dream Story, and Lloyd Bacon’s 42nd Street.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 252A KAFKA & HIS WORLD

This course explores the weird, dreamlike, eerie, and inexplicable world of Kafka’s writings. In Kafka’s stories dogs conduct investigations, apes report to academies, men turn into bugs, the Statue of Liberty holds up a sword, and arrests occur without explanation as all expectations and assurances about the “rules” of existence, thought, and social order come into question. In this course we will read texts such as: The Trial, The Metamorphosis, Amerika, The Castle, Investigations of a Dog, A Report to an Academy, In the Penal Colony, and A Hunger Artist. This course is taught in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 253 DANTE'S DIVINE COMEDY

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CLT 253B BOCCACCIO'S DECAMERON

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 253C DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART I. "INFERNO" AND "PURGATORIO"

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 253D DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART II. "PURGATORIO" AND "PARADISO"

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 253F THE DIVINE COMEDY OF DANTE ALIGHIERI: DISCOVER THE WONDERS OF A MEDIEVAL MIND

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 254 VISUALIZING DANTE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 254C JAPANESE SCIENCE FICTION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 254D JPN MYSTERY FICTION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 255A GREAT RUSSIAN WRITERS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 255C CHEKHOV AND THE MODERN SHORT STORY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 255D DOSTOEVSKY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 256 GERMANY YEAR ZERO

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 256B DON QUIXOTE

This course entails a close reading of the novel in Engllish trtanslation, coupled with a focus on the ways in which both the novel and/or protagonist have been adapted, adopted, interpreted or incorporated by various cittical and popular traditions both inside and outside of Spain from the time of its original publication in 1605 through the 21st century. We will examine several filmic adaptations, illuatrations and paintings as well, withan eye toward critically examining the problemaatic employment of Don Quixote as an icon of Pan-Hispanic culture. However, we will continually return to the novel as our anchor throughout the course, while assessing the constantly changing ways in which comtemporary readers and scholars appoach the text. Course is taught in English. *Students taking the course for Spanish credit will do the bulk of the work in Spanish

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 257A THE ARABIAN NIGHTS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 258 MIDDLE EASTERN CINEMA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 259 TOLSTOY'S WAR AND PEACE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 260 TRUTH & POWER

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 261 PHILOSOPHY OF ART

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 262C WALKING ON YOUR HEAD: WRITING VERTIGO IN GERMAN LIT AND PHILOSOPHY

Beginning in the 18th century a new question arises with regard to the subject’s orientation in thought. However, almost as soon as this orientation has taken place, its double, vertigo, appears as a pathological inversion of the overly subjective interpretation of truth. This double, which haunts the last two centuries of thought, ultimately empties the subject of all content. Although this de-centering of the subject does produce a compensatory relief from certain social constraints, it is not always easily controlled. In this course we will read a series of texts that deal with this problem of vertigo.

CLT 263C THE SHAPING OF A NATION - POLITICS AND CULTURE IN FASCIST ITALY

Interviewed by the Chicago Daily News in 1924, Mussolini said that Fascism was “the greatest experiment in history in making Italians.” The statement defined the objective of the regime to complete the work of Risorgimento that had only succeeded in “making Italy.” Within the historical framework of the so-called Ventennio Fascista – from 1925 to 1945 – the course examines Mussolini’s cultural politics as a fundamental strategy not only to gain popular consent but to implement his vision of Italian national identity. We will study the meaning of the “Fascist Ethical State” within the politics of education, the myth of Rome, the ideology sustaining archeological, architectural, and restoration projects, the development of the graphic arts. The film component examines A) documentaries of the regime and films produced under the regime by the newly founded Cinecittà as means to build consensus and propagate the regime’s ideology, and B) post Fascism films that express different critical views on Fascism itself.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

CLT 264A THE CULTURE OF ZEN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 264B MODERN JPN LIT

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 265 RUSSIAN DRAMA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 265B RUSSIA GOES TO MOVIES

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 265C DANGEROUS TEXTS

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CLT 265D RUSSIAN LIT BTWN REVS

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 265E DANGEROUS TEXTS

When modern Russian literature began to evolve in the mid-1600s, the printed or written text was immediately seen as a potential danger to the power of Church and State. In this course we will examine dangerous texts' from the 17th century to the present to see what aspects of texts and their authors were seen as threats and how these threats were dealt with. We will also see the ways in which writers did indeed perceive themselves as a second government' and how this changed the way they wrote. The reading list will include works by: Avvakum, Radishchev, Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Babel, Mayakovsky, Mandelstam, Pasternak, Yevtushenko, Solzhenitsyn, Voinovich, Grossman, and Sinyavsky/Tertz. The goal of this course is to arrive at an understanding of the unique role played by literature in Russian history. In English.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

CLT 266 NAPOLEON IMAGE,MYTH, HISTORY

Course examines the image of Napoleon at the intersection of myth and history. Literary portrayals, paintings, and films. Conducted in English.

CLT 267 TRADITIONAL JAPANESE LITERAT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 267A AESTHTCS IN TRAD CHINESE ART

No description

CLT 268A CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE ART

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CLT 269 CHINESE IN THE AMERICAS

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 270 RELIGION & JAPANESE CULTR

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 271 CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART

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CLT 272 FASSBINDER

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 273 FRENCH CINEMA 1930-1960

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 275 FRENCH PHILOSOPHY SINCE 1960

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 276 20TH CENTURY THOUGHT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 277 MODERN JPN LIT IN TRANS

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 278 HELLO KITTY MUST DIE: JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 279 IMMIGRATION IN FRENCH LITERATURE AND FILM

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 280 AESTHETICS

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Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 281A CONTEMPORARY FRENCH THOUGHT

This course is a survey of the major intellectual movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Ferdinand de Saussure and the study of the linguistic sign, we move on to consider cultural anthropology and the invention of structuralism. Finally, the course takes a detailed look at Derridean deconstruction, the movement that has influenced so much Anglo-American ciriticism, and we conclude with a brief foray into other forms of poststructuralism.

CLT 281B PSYCHOANALYSIS & LITERATURE

How does literature “think”, and what does it think about? Why are so many literary texts about love, death, and/or people finding out about who they are? Reading literature with psychoanalytic theory, we will discuss the formation of subjectivity, perspective, the gaze, and love and death; we will ask how literature communicates things that no other form of language can.

CLT 281C REVOLUTIONS&REVOLUTIONARIES

Why did the eighteenth century produce so many thinkers who completely transformed the fiction, philosophy, and politics of their day? In this course, we will examine works that broke more or less completely with the past to produce new models of thinking, of being, and of entertaining. Political and philosophical writers who implicitly or explicitly criticized moral and political authorities produced their works alongside the new literary form known as the novel, which entertained mass audiences with its new and often scandalous stories of ordinary people. What do all these works have in common, and what conditions led to their sudden birth and rapid rise in popularity during this period? We will read works by Locke, Cyrano de Bergerac, Voltaire, Pope, Diderot, Jefferson, and de Sade.

CLT 282 FREUD AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

CLT 282A MARX & MARXISM

It is not overstated to say that the works of Karl Marx have provided the transformational impulse to many of the changes of the 20th century. Who was this person, Karl Marx? Why is it that in this post-Cold War world his writings continue both to inspire and threaten contemporary readers? How have those inspired by Marx further developed his ideas to constitute the discourse of Marxism? In this course we will begin with discussions of key works by Marx. We will then move on to examine some significant contributions to Marxism. Additionally majors and minors can sign up for GER 211 where significant texts will be read and discussed in German.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 282B NIETZSCHE & NIETZSCHEANS

Friedrich Nietzsche continues to be one of the most influential modern philosophers, yet controversy surrounds almost every aspect of his life and work. This course will help students go beyond the controversy in order to consider Nietzsche's texts discerningly and how he approached the problems of truth, power, and morality. Close examination of his most important writings will be complemented by inquiry into Nietzsche's effects on twentieth-century philosophy. Other thinkers include Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, Sarah Kofman, Jacques Derrida and Giles Deleuze.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 282C FREUD AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

Freud is one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. His ground-breaking work on dreams, the Oedipus Complex, and psychoanalytic method have profoundly changed our understanding of the psyche and social interaction. This course provides a basic survey of Freud’s most important and often controversial writings/discoveries within their historcial context and with regards to significant criticisms of his work. “Freud: An Introduction” is part of a cluster which includes courses of Marx and Nietzsche (these courses need not be taken in any particular order) Additionally majors and minors can sign up for GER 211 where significant texts will be read and discussed in German.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 282D STRANGERS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 283 SARTRE & HEIDEGGER

This course studies two of the most influential works in twentieth-century philosophy: Martin Heidegger¿s Being and Time (1927) and Jean-Paul Sartre¿s Being and Nothingness (1943). Together these two books defined existential phenomenology and changed the course of philosophy, exerting a profound influence over later writers and thinkers. Since both philosophers sought to fundamentally redefine human subjectivity-its place in society, history, and the philosophical tradition--we will examine concepts such as freedom, reality, temporality, subjectivity, death, emotion, and the relation between self and other. We will also compare Sartre¿s insights with those of Heidegger, particularly in regard to the concept of humanism, juxtaposing Sartre¿s famous manifesto ¿Existentialism is a Humanism¿ (1946) with Heidegger¿s critique of Sartre and French existentialism in his ¿Letter on Humanism¿ (1947).

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 284 TRANSLATION AND WORLD LITERATURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 285 MODERN TURKISH

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 286 NEW AUSTRIAN CINEMA

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 287 STUDIES IN TRANSLATION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 288 NEW GERMAN CINEMA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 288W DIRECTOR STUDIOS:

No description

CLT 289 FRENCH CINEMA 1930-1960

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CLT 291 WEIMAR CULTURE

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 292 PHOTO IN SP & SP AMERICA

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 293 TOWARD A SOCIAL LITERATURE

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 294 ON GENEALOGY

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 295 CHI LIT IN 20TH CENTURY

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 296 RUSSIA'S SILVER AGE

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 298 JOURNEY TO THE FEAST

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2016

CLT 389 MAJOR SEMINAR

CLT 389 is an introduction to theories and critical approaches as strategies for reading and interpreting texts, films, and other cultural objects. Students in this course will read a variety of literature and theory with an eye toward understanding what criticism's roles are, why and how the study of literature and culture (still) matters, and how they can develop their own critical skills based on their personal interests and concerns. This course teaches reading strategies that will help students to get to the heart of what they are studying, and very significant amounts of course work will be devoted to the art of writing the literary essay. How do you choose a thesis, what methods of investigation do you employ, and how do you synthesize your analysis? Required of all Majors in MLC, this course is also open to students with a Minor in an MLC discipline, or by permission of the Instructor.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 390 SUPERVISED TEACHING

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 393 SENIOR PROJECT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 394 INTERNSHIP

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 395 HONORS SEMINAR

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 402B HOLOCAUST: AFFECT AND ABSENCE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 403 POLISH AND AMERICAN POETRY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 405 LATIN-AMERICAN FILM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 405A CONTEMPORARY FRENCH CULTURE

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive view of French Contemporary culture through major trends of French cultural, political, and intellectual life in the recent years. While we cannot study factual representations of French culture, we will attempt to establish a conceptual framework that would help us in the understanding of complex questions such as What does it mean to be French?, What is France? What is French culture?, etc.

CLT 405B FRANCOPHONE CULTURES

Francophone cultures involves the study of discourses produced by the imperial France on the colonized or former Colonized, and the impact of colonization or decolonization in French modern culture. The study of Francophone texts introduces students to one of the most dynamic aspect of “Cultures in French.” The course will finally, in the light of multiculturalism, attempt to look at ways and means that might lead to a better understanding of France’s standing in the World today. By exposing students to a broad range of ideas, to the relativity of all cultural representations, this course hopes to introduce them to the complexities of cultural diversity and to challenge stereotypical perceptions of French culture.

CLT 408A TRADITIONAL JPN CULTURE

An overview of Japan¿s traditional culture through the most prominent examples of it visual, literary, and performing arts, with attention to the social contexts of aesthetic experience and to ideas of a ¿national culture.¿ Taught in English, additional work available in Japanese where appropriate.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 408C CONTEMPORARY JPN CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 409 ON GENEALOGY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 409B RUSSIAN IDENTITY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 410 MIYAZAKI & GHIBLI

A course on the work of the animated films of Hayao Miyazaki, the world view and visual sensibilities of his creation, Studio Ghibli, and anime as film form and cultural phenomenon. Focusing on Miyazaki’s films, we will examine the "nuts and bolts" of animated cinematic construction (use of narrative space, character design, etc.); methods of adaptation, influence, and genre variation; anime reception and fan culture; and issues of race, gender, landscape, identity and cultural conscience. Such detailed analysis reveals the range and possibilities of anime and its place in popular culture on a local and global scale.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 410B POWER OF POPULAR CULTURE

No description

CLT 411B FRENCH CINEMA: THE NEW WAVE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 411C HISTORY OF FRENCH CINEMA

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 411D CONTEMPORARY FRENCH FILM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

CLT 411E FILMING/WRITING POSTCOL WOMEN

his course will explore the Postcolonial Woman Condition in films and novels produced by African andCaribbean female directors and writers. Capturing the complex destinies of African and Caribbean women, challenging the machismo that is inscribed in cultural and social fabrics of their communities, exploring creative and daring venues that may mobilize energies for women liberation are constitutive of postcolonial women filmmaking and writing traditions, from the framing of the deferred dream or the Saaraba poetics to the Community- oriented camera. The course interrogates the paradoxes of the African filmmaking/writing traditions, especially itsvreliance on western expertise and languages, financing and sometimes audiences to exist. From diasporic connections to street children, from anticolonial struggles to postcolonial disillusionments, from genital mutilations to Aids, from incest to rape, this course is addressed to students of French studies, Women studies and Film studies.

CLT 411F CLASSICAL FILM THEORY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 411G FEMINIST FILM THEORY

No description

CLT 411J FILMS OF JEAN-LUC GODARD

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

CLT 411M FRENCH IN FILM

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 412A MONSTERS,GHOSTS & ALIENS

This course focuses on the horror genre as popular entertainment in Germany, England, and the US in the 19th and 20th centuries. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of "others" as monsters in literature and film (Frankenstein, Vampires, Devils, Aliens, etc.). Authors/filmmakers include: Hoffmann, Poe,  Shelley, Stoker, Jackson, Rice, Harris, King, Murnau, Jordan, Wise, Siegel, Kubrick, Demme, . This course is part of the Horror in Literature & Film Cluster.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

CLT 412C NEW GERMAN CINEMA

In this course we will explore representations of women in post-World War II German cinema. Moving chronologically from the building of two German states to the post-unification period, we will consider the constantly shifting meaning of , woman in popular and avant-garde films, narrative and documentary films, films by both male and female directors. We will consider equally films from East and West Germany. How does woman function as a narrative device in these films? Do women behind the camera change, woman’s meaning within the film? Can woman consistently be reduced to one narrative trope (mother, comrade or whore), or does she resist? All readings and discussions are in English; all films are subtitled.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 412H FAIRY TALES, MYTHS & LEGENDS

Grimm's fairy tales to urban legends, this course will examine the stories we love to tell ourselves. They horrify us and, yet, strangely comfort us as well. What is it that causes this effect? How do these tales help us shape the world around us? This course is part of the humanities cluster "Horror in Literature and Film." It is designed to familiarize students with the tools of cultural studies.

CLT 412I CINEMA & REVOLUTION

This course will explore the relationship between film and revolution in West German cinema from 1965 to the present. We will consider cinema¿s potential as a revolutionary medium, while also focusing on how revolution is thematized and constructed in both fiction and documentary films. The course will engage with issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, recreating the cinema as a revolutionary artistic form, feminism as a revolutionary perspective, the domestic sphere as a revolutionary space, and the co-optation of the cinemas revolutionary potential through mass consumption.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 412M HOLLYWOOD BEHIND THE WALL: An Introduction to East German Cinema

This course will explore major developments in the East German cinema, including issues such as coming to terms with the fascist past, popular filmmaking and art cinema, cinema as a pedagogical tool, artistic dissent and state censorship, socialist ideologies of gender, and the politics of documentary. Each film will be explored in relation to its socio-historical context, providing students with an overview of East German film and culture.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 413B CITIES&THE COUNTRY IN MOD CH

Explores changing cultural meanings of country and city from early 20th century urban culture through revolution and to the present era of mass migration and urban destruction and renewal.

Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 414A TOURIST JAPAN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 414B MOBSTERS, MONSTERS & SWORDS

No description

CLT 414C AKIRA KUROSAWA

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 414E JAPANESE ANIMATION

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CLT 414G JAPANESE NEW WAVE CINENA

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CLT 414H NAGISA OSHIMA:

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 414M ATOMIC CREATURES: GODZILLA

Origins and development of the Japanese kaiju eiga (monster film): nuclear imagery and the science fiction/horror/creature film genre.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 414N TOURIST JAPAN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 415A RUSSIA GOES TO MOVIES

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 416A MEXICAN FILM

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 416B SPANISH FILM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 416C WOMEN IN HISPANIC FILM

No description

CLT 417 Men of Marble, Women of Steel: An Introduction to East European Film

This course will provide a general introduction to the history, artistry and politics of East European film. We will begin by considering the place of East European film in the context of contemporary film studies and the industry structure of state socialist film making. We will then explore individual films from a regional (not national) perspective, considering how they confront issues such as the burden of history and ethics, the tensions between modernity and tradition, the struggle between creativity and censorship, as well as the reluctant feminism of state socialism and representations of gender and sexuality.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 417B RACE & GENDER IN POP FILM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 419 WEIMAR CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 421 MUTILATED BODIES

'Transnational sisterhood' or cultural imperialism? Legitimate ritualized practice or outdated violent ritual? Genital cutting, female circumcision, female genital surgery? The controversy over this practice already begins with the act of its naming. If there seems to be a consensus about the physical violence imposed on the female body, why is it that western feminist discourse is suspected of perpetuating the mutilation African voices? This course seeks to provide an understanding of the context in which a fragmented 'transnational sisterhood' allows for a proliferation of mutilated discourses on mutilated postcolonial bodies. Readings and Films include Alice Walker (Warrior Marks), Florence Ayissi Fauziya Kassindja (Do They Hear You When You Cry), Maryse Conde and more critical and theoretical readings from African, French and North American authors. In English.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 422A SEXUALITY AND GENDER: 18TH CENTURY REPRESENTATION

This course explores 18th century conceptions/constructions of the body, sexuality, and gender as manifest in medical papers, handbooks, aesthetic essays, and literary works to include Lessing’s Laocoon and Philotas, Fielding’s The Female Husband, Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Cleland’s Fanny Hill, de Sade’s Justine, Goethe’s Gotz von Berlichingen, Kleist’s Holy Caecilia and Puppet Theater, Diderot’s The Nun, Shelley’s Frankenstein. Additional theoretical readings include: Foucault, Kristeva, Butler, Sedgwick, Gilman, Habermas, Cassirer, Todorov, Laqueur, and G.S. Rousseau.

CLT 422B GENDER & SEXUALITY

This course will examine literary, artistic, and theoretical representations of gender and sexuality as they have changed in the course of the 20 Century. The focus will be on texts from Western Europe and the US, but we will also consider other perspectives. From the New Women to French Feminists and transnational feminism. from homophile societies to “queer nation and gay marriage, from Sigmund Freud to Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, we will explore the contested and politically charged debates around gender and sexuality that have shaped our views of identity over the last century.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 422C GENDER LOVE & FAMILIES

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 423 AND NOW... DEEP THOUGHTS WITH GERMAN-JEWISH THINKERS!

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 424A JAPANESE WOMEN WRITERS

No description

CLT 424B MODERN JPN WOMEN WRITERS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 426D GENDER IN SPANISH-AMER LIT

Through study of texts (mostly novels) written by women from Spanish America, we will ask broad questions concerning cultural contexts with respect to sexuality and gender, language, aesthetics, psychology, and social issues. The course will use materials from a variety of fields (literary and cultural theory, history, sociology, anthropology, feminist studies) in addition to the primary texts. Emphasis on collaborative research and progressive writing assignments. Campus visit by one of the authors planned. Class taught in English.

Prerequisites: SP 200 for SP 260 only
Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 427 BODY POLITICS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 428 BRAZILIAN LIT AND CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 429 COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN LIT

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 430 FILM AS OBJECT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 430A FRENCH SOCIAL THOUGHT

This course examines the singular contribution of French thinkers to the development of the social sciences (or the “sciences of man,” as they are known in France) in the twentieth century. We will examine the theory of gift exchange in Marcel Mauss, the rise of structural anthropology in Claude Lévi-Strauss, the sociology of Pierre Bourdieu, and the theories of religion and culture of René Girard and Marcel Gauchet. We will also study post-structuralist thinkers such as Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Nancy when their work touches on issues of society and religion. Taught in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 431 AFRICAN NOVEL: ITS THEORY AND ITS CONTEXTS

This course is a study of the Francophone African Novel from North Sub-Saharan African, and from Madagascar. The course will explore the political and cultural contexts that gave rise to the modern African literature in gerneral, and to the modern Afraican Novel in particular.

CLT 431B MADNESS & POST COLONIAL LIT

This course will explore inscriptions of madness in post-colonial African and Caribbean texts. Beyond the obvious and visible signs of what is generally termed "madness" (from the pathological to the political or cultural), we will ask ourselves if the postcolonial arena cannot be interpreted as a pervasive manifestation of madness, that is to say, of something fundamentally "alien, foreign" to the Known, to the imperial destructuring order, and to the disarticulated colonial and post-independent communities. By bringing together texts from different and diverse cultural and intellectual areas such as France, Guadeloupe, and Africa, we seek to confront the various "scriptures." Issues of witch-hunt, of disintegration of Juletane, the Antillean women in West Africa, from Foucault's normative panopticism to Fanon's discussion of the black experience, the postcolonial situation, articulated or silenced, will be the focus of this course. Taught in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 431F FOUCAULT & ETHICS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 432 JEWISH WRITER & REBEL

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 433 MEDIUM&MATERIALITY IN CHI

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 435 TEXTS BEYOND BORDERS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 436B US LATINOS/LATINAS

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a writing and culture in its rich geographic and ethnic diversity; Latinization of the American landscape; exile, immigration, cultural syncretism.

CLT 437 GENDER & SEX IN 20TH CENTURY

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 438 CONTEMPORARY POETRY

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Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 439 REPRESENTING AFR-AMERICANS

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 440 GERMAN JEWS

Jews have lived in Germany since the Middle Ages and have contributed a great deal to German Culture, as well as developing unique German Jewish cultures; these facts are often overshadowed by the tragic events of World War II. In this seminar we will explore the rich and diverse German Jewish cultures of nineteenth and twentieth centuries in a range of texts including fiction, travel texts, philosophical and historical writings. Topics will include the Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment), assimilation, Zionism, anti-Semitism and the relationship between East and West European Jews. Readings and discussions in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

CLT 441 CARIBBEAN NOVEL & THEORY

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 441A PERFORMANCE STUDIES

Study of major authors of the French Enlightenment, as well as their predecessors and contemporaries, including Marivaux, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Prevost, Rousseau, Diderot, Sade, and Laclos.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 441H THE FRANCOPHONE NOVEL

A survey of the Francophone literary world (Quebec, North Africa, Central Africa, the Caribbean, etc.) in an effort to identify traits and common characteristics of these regions. We will attempt a critical analysis of selected works by well-known Francophone writers and their portrayal of issues such as poverty, religion, culture, politics and the impact of France assimilation.

CLT 441I CARIBBEAN NOVEL & THEORY

This course is a study of major Caribbean novels and major theoretical texts. The reading will be structured around the notion of “Antillanite” or Creolization elaborated by Martinican Edouard Glissant and his heirs Chamoiseau and Confiant of the “Creolite” movement. The controversial presence of the Other (Africa and France) in the Caribbean, the need to build a Caribbean authenticity in order to participate freely in what Glisant Glissant terms “Relation planetaire” (Planetary Relations) will also be thoroughly examined.

CLT 441M THE EARLY EUROPEAN NOVELS

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Last Offered: Spring 2012

CLT 442A POE & HOFFMANN

This course explores the beginnings of the horror and detective genres in the 19th century. Particular attention is devoted to the narrative structure, tropes, and psychological content of the strange tales by Poe and Hoffmann. Theories of horror are also addressed to include discussions by lessing, Todorov, Huet, and Kristeva. NOTE: THIS COURSE IS TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 443 WIZARDS, MAGIC AND FANTASY

This course traces the development of the fantasy literature genre from ETA Hoffman’s The Golden Pot to JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Particular attention is devoted to the tropes and structures of fantasy narratives as they offer the reader an escape from a mundane or threatening world and provide intricate social critiques. Topics addressed include: wizards, witches, talking cats, flights of fantasy, new worlds, and social consructions of work, class, others, families, mothers, fathers, masculinity, femininity etc. Authors include: Hoffmann, Rowling, Shelley, Orwell, Tolkien, Kafka, Atwood etc.

CLT 446B FACING FACTS:NON-FICTN WRTNG

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Last Offered: Spring 2011

CLT 447 THEORY & PRACTICE OF COMEDY

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Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 448 ON THE MOVE:TRAV,WANDRS&EXPL

This course covers a wide variety of texts in which mobility plays a central role, including films, cultural theory and fiction. The time period we cover will be from the nineteenth century to the present day. Some of the questions we will explore are: What are the reasons people move from one place to another? Who controls the movement and how? How do texts allow us as viewers and readers travel? Texts and discussions are in English.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

CLT 449 Dungeons & Dragons: Myths and LEgends in German Literature

With the recent revival of Wagner’s Ring Cycle at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, the continued popularity of J.R.R. Tolkein’s Lord of the Rings novels and recent film adaptations of Beowulf and Tristan and Isolde, it’s easy to see that people still regularly like to “get medieval”. In this course we’re going to look at the German origins of these modern texts by reading the original source material: The Nibelungenlied, Parzival, Tristan as well as many other important medieval works. We will also look at modern variations on those texts, from Wagner and Tolkein to modern role-playing and video games that use the medieval period as their settings.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

CLT 450 NABOKOV

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 451 STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 452 BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY

The city in film and literature is never just a physical space - discourses of modernity and urban life are mapped onto real and imagines urban spaces. In this course we will explore how the relationship between the spaces of the city and the stories told about and through them shape our understanding of urban life. Some of the texts we will examine are: Fritz Lang’s M, Arthur Schnitzler’s Dream Story, and Lloyd Bacon’s 42nd Street.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 452A KAFKA & HIS WORLD

This course explores the weird, dreamlike, eerie, and inexplicable world of Kafka’s writings. In Kafka’s stories dogs conduct investigations, apes report to academies, men turn into bugs, the Statue of Liberty holds up a sword, and arrests occur without explanation as all expectations and assurances about the “rules” of existence, thought, and social order come into question. In this course we will read texts such as: The Trial, The Metamorphosis, Amerika, The Castle, Investigations of a Dog, A Report to an Academy, In the Penal Colony, and A Hunger Artist. This course is taught in English.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 454C JAPANESE SCIENCE FICTION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 454D JPN MYSTERY FICTION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 455A GREAT RUSSIAN WRITERS

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 455C CHEKHOV AND THE MODERN SHORT STORY

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 456 GERMANY YEAR ZERO

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 458 MIDDLE EASTERN CINEMA

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 460 TRUTH & POWER

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 461 PHILOSOPHY OF ART

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 462 VISUAL & CULTURAL STUDIES

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 462C JAPANESE WOMEN WRITERS

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CLT 464A THE CULTURE OF ZEN

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Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 464B MODERN JPN LIT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 465B RUSSIA GOES TO MOVIES

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Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 466 NAPOLEON IMAGE,MYTH, HISTORY

Course examines the image of Napoleon at the intersection of myth and history. Literary portrayals, paintings, and films. Conducted in English.

CLT 467 AUTHOR:ANX OF INFL

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Last Offered: Spring 2013

CLT 471 CONTEMPORARY ASIAN ART

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CLT 472 FASSBINDER

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 473 FRENCH CINEMA 1930-1960

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 475 FRENCH PHILOSOPHY SINCE 1960

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Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 477 MODERN JPN LIT IN TRANS

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Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 478 HELLO KITTY MUST DIE: JAPANESE POPULAR CULTURE IN GLOBAL CONTEXTS

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 479 IMMIGRATION IN FRENCH LITERATURE AND FILM

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 480 AESTHETICS

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Last Offered: Spring 2015

CLT 481A CONTEMPORARY FRENCH THOUGHT

This course is a survey of the major intellectual movements of the twentieth century. Beginning with Ferdinand de Saussure and the study of the linguistic sign, we move on to consider cultural anthropology and the invention of structuralism. Finally, the course takes a detailed look at Derridean deconstruction, the movement that has influenced so much Anglo-American ciriticism, and we conclude with a brief foray into other forms of poststructuralism.

CLT 481B PSYCHOANALYSIS & LITERATURE

How does literature “think”, and what does it think about? Why are so many literary texts about love, death, and/or people finding out about who they are? Reading literature with psychoanalytic theory, we will discuss the formation of subjectivity, perspective, the gaze, and love and death; we will ask how literature communicates things that no other form of language can.

CLT 482 FREUD AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

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Last Offered: Fall 2010

CLT 482A MARX & MARXISM

It is not overstated to say that the works of Karl Marx have provided the transformational impulse to many of the changes of the 20th century. Who was this person, Karl Marx? Why is it that in this post-Cold War world his writings continue both to inspire and threaten contemporary readers? How have those inspired by Marx further developed his ideas to constitute the discourse of Marxism? In this course we will begin with discussions of key works by Marx. We will then move on to examine some significant contributions to Marxism. Additionally majors and minors can sign up for GER 211 where significant texts will be read and discussed in German.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

CLT 482B NIETZSCHE & NIETZSCHEANS

Friedrich Nietzsche continues to be one of the most influential modern philosophers, yet controversy surrounds almost every aspect of his life and work. This course will help students go beyond the controversy in order to consider Nietzsche's texts discerningly and how he approached the problems of truth, power, and morality. Close examination of his most important writings will be complemented by inquiry into Nietzsche's effects on twentieth-century philosophy. Other thinkers include Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, Sarah Kofman, Jacques Derrida and Giles Deleuze.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 482C FREUD AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

Freud is one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. His ground-breaking work on dreams, the Oedipus Complex, and psychoanalytic method have profoundly changed our understanding of the psyche and social interaction. This course provides a basic survey of Freud’s most important and often controversial writings/discoveries within their historcial context and with regards to significant criticisms of his work. “Freud: An Introduction” is part of a cluster which includes courses of Marx and Nietzsche (these courses need not be taken in any particular order) Additionally majors and minors can sign up for GER 211 where significant texts will be read and discussed in German.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 482D STRANGERS

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 483 SARTRE & HEIDEGGER

This course studies two of the most influential works in twentieth-century philosophy: Martin Heidegger¿s Being and Time (1927) and Jean-Paul Sartre¿s Being and Nothingness (1943). Together these two books defined existential phenomenology and changed the course of philosophy, exerting a profound influence over later writers and thinkers. Since both philosophers sought to fundamentally redefine human subjectivity-its place in society, history, and the philosophical tradition--we will examine concepts such as freedom, reality, temporality, subjectivity, death, emotion, and the relation between self and other. We will also compare Sartre¿s insights with those of Heidegger, particularly in regard to the concept of humanism, juxtaposing Sartre¿s famous manifesto ¿Existentialism is a Humanism¿ (1946) with Heidegger¿s critique of Sartre and French existentialism in his ¿Letter on Humanism¿ (1947).

Last Offered: Fall 2016

CLT 484 TRANSLATION AND WORLD LITERATURE

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 486 NEW AUSTRIAN CINEMA

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 487 STUDIES IN TRANSLATION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 488 NEW GERMAN CINEMA

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Last Offered: Spring 2016

CLT 489 MAJOR SEMINAR

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 491 READING COURSE IN COMP LIT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 492 PHOTO IN SP & SP AMERICA

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Last Offered: Fall 2014

CLT 495 MASTER'S RESEARCH IN COMP LI

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Last Offered: Spring 2017

CLT 496 NEW AUSTRIAN CINEMA

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

CLT 591 PHD READING COURSE

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 592 LANGUAGE LEARNING AND TEACHING I

The purpose of this six-week course is to prepare foreign language teaching assistants an understanding of second language learning and the current teaching methods used in foreign language classrooms. The course highlights the communicative approach to teaching language in which reading, speaking, listening and writing are integrated into the language learning process. Through experiential learning experiences, that included peer and instructor feedback, teaching assistants will learn to develop meaningful and culturally relevant lessons.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 593 LANGUAGE LEARNING & TEACHING II

This course is a continuation of Languages, Learning, and Teaching I. Teaching assistants will develop and implement authentic materials/lessons that reflect the lives of their students. Students will also develop an understanding of long term planning and assessment. TAs will continue to receive and provide corrective feedback on lesson plans and lesson demonstrations as a means to build confidence and effective teaching methods.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

CLT 595 PHD RESEARCH

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 595A PHD RESEARCH IN ABSENTIA

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 890 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE - MA

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Last Offered: Summer 2011

CLT 895 CONT OF MASTER'S ENROLLMENT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 899 MASTERS DISSERTATION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 985 LEAVE OF ABSENCE

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 986V FULL TIME VISITING STUDENT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 990 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE

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Last Offered: Summer 2011

CLT 995 CONT OF DOCTORAL ENROLLMENT

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 997 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 997A DOCT DISSERTATN IN ABSENTIA

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 999 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

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Last Offered: Fall 2017

CLT 999A DOCT DISSERTATN IN ABSENTIA

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Last Offered: Fall 2017