Faculty

June J. Hwang

Associate Professor of German
PhD, University of California, Berkeley

429 Lattimore Hall
(585) 275-4251
june.hwang@rochester.edu

Office Hours: ON LEAVE, FALL 2016

Biography

June Hwang specializes in twentieth-century literature, film, and culture, with an emphasis on the topics of German Jewish identity, questions of modernity, film theory, and critical theory. Her book Lost in Time: Locating the Stranger in German Modernity (Northwestern UP, 2014) explores discourses of timelessness in the works of central figures of German modernity, such as Walter Benjamin, Georg Simmel, Siegfried Kracauer, and Helmuth Plessner, as well as Alfred Döblin, Joseph Roth, and Hugo Bettauer. She argues that in the Weimar Republic the move toward a-historicization is itself a historical phenomenon, one that can be understood by examining the intersections of discourses about urban modernity, the stranger, and German Jewish identity. These intersections shed light on conceptions of German Jewish identity that rely on a negation of the specific and temporal as a way to legitimize a historical outsider position, creating a dynamic position that simultaneously challenges and acknowledges the limitations of an outsider's agency. Her current work includes a collection of essays that look at the relationship between minority identities, power, privilege, and subjectivity in relation to Holocaust Studies.

Courses Offered (subject to change)

  • GER 203  Introduction to German Literature (Fall 2015)
  • GER 209  Cowboys and Indians (Fall 2013)
  • GER 219  Weimar Culture (Spring 2013)
  • GER 234  Strangers in a Strange Land (Spring 2014)
  • GER 237  After the Wall (Spring 2013)
  • GER 247  Holocaust: Affect and Absence (Spring 2017)
  • GER 252  Bright Lights, Big City: The Urban Imagination (Fall 2015)
  • GER 275  Digital Cityscapes (Spring 2014)

Selected Publications

Conference Participation

  • "Human Rights, Genocide, and Germans' Moral Campaigns in the World." Thirty-Ninth Annual German Studies Association Conference. Washington, DC. 1-4 Oct. 2015. Seminar.
  • "Documentation, Archive, and Representation in Documentary Films About the Third Reich." Fourth Bienniel German Jewish Studies Workshop. Duke U, Durham. February 2015.
  • "Rethinking Modernism After Cultural Studies." Thirty-Seventh Annual German Studies Association Conference. Denver. 3-6 Oct. 2013. Seminar.
  • "On the Positive Nature of Estrangement." Third Bienniel German Jewish Studies Workshop. Duke U, Durham. 10-12 Feb. 2013.
  • "Making the Father Visible on Film: Ludin's Zwei oder Drei Dinge, die ich von ihm weiß." Perpetrators and the Construction of Public Memory of the NS-Zeit (Sponsored by the GSA Memory Studies Network). Thirty-Sixth Annual German Studies Association Conference. Milwaukee. 4-7 Oct. 2012. Panel.
  • "Gen Osten Reisen und im Weste(r)n ankommen. Cowboys und Indianer im deutschen Kontext." Department of German Languages and Literature. Duke U, Durham. Nov. 2011. Invited lecture.

Honors and Activities

  • Summer Institute on the Holocaust and Jewish Civilization Fellowship at Northwestern University, Summer 2014
  • Max Kade Summer Fellowship, University of California, Berkeley, 2006
  • Dean's Normative Time Fellowship University of California, Berkeley, 2004-2005
  • Social Science Research Council/Berlin Program for Advanced German and European Studies for dissertation research at the Freie Universität Berlin, 2003-2004
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, 2002
  • Graduate Opportunity Program Fellowship, University of California, Berkeley, 2000-2001, 2002-2003
  • Fulbright Fellowship, Universität Konstanz in Germany, 1998-1999