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Undergraduate Program

Courses

Courses currently being offered:

Fall >
Spring >

Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.


Below you will find a list of all undergraduate courses that have been offered.
NOTE: Not all of these courses are offered in any given year.

HIS 100 Sherlock: Race, Gender, Crime

In this course, we will investigate both the fictional and the real worlds of Sherlock Holmes. Through reading, watching, discussing, and writing about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s stories and their film adaptations, we will explore Victorian London and some real crimes that took place there while getting a better understanding of how the relationship of race, gender, and crime informed and affected the politics and culture of the British Empire. This course satisfies the "Gateway Seminar" course requirement for History majors.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 102 The West and the World to 1500

While exploring the history of Europe and its neighbors from the ancient to the medieval period, this course focuses on how people borrowed from, adapted, and reconciled various ideas to suit their own needs to form, over time, a coherent set of cultural values. To this end, we will consider several themes throughout the semester, including changing models of political organization, ideas of individual rights and responsibilities, attitudes towards women and 'outsiders’, and understandings of nature and of divine power.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 103 The West and the World since 1492

A thematic survey of European history during the period of Europe's rise to and fall from global dominance. It follows roughly on History 102 but does not assume that you have taken it. The reading consists of important philosophical, political, and literary works and documents, supplemented by a textbook.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 104 The Ancient City

This course examines the phenomenon of urbanism in the ancient Mediterranean world. After a brief consideration of the rise of cities in the Near East and Egypt, the course focuses on the cities and colonies of ancient Greece and of the Roman Empire, with special attention devoted to Athens and Rome. Topics covered include town planning, public and private spaces and building types, urban life, and colonization, as seen through the archaeological remains of cities located around the Mediterranean basin and beyond.

Last Offered: Summer 2010

HIS 105 Justice and Equality

What is justice? Is it universal or does it vary across cultures and over time? Does justice require equality? If so, equality of what? What steps must we take to become more just and more egalitarian? What can art tell us about justice? What can justice tell us about art? The world’s most powerful minds have wrestled with these questions, and the answers they have posed shape our contemporary global debates. In this unique course, taught by multiple faculty from across the humanities and social sciences, we will consider different conceptions of justice and equality, with special attention to their relevance to the contemporary moment. Beginning with Plato’s Republic , we will address works by such thinkers as Rousseau, Mary Wollstonecraft, Franz Fanon, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, and Martin Luther King. Students and faculty from multiple sections of this course will occasionally meet as one group to analyze how different disciplines confront these complex topics. Outside speakers will also address the course.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 106 Witchcraft and Witch Hunts, 1400-1800

During the Renaissance and Reformation, many people throughout Europe became convinced that society was threatened by conspiracies of witches. The resulting panics led to the execution of thousands of people, mostly lower-class women. The course delves into intellectual, cultural and social history to explain how and why this happened, with discussion of both broad trends and local factors. As we will see, responses to witchcraft reflected major changes in European society, culture, and politics that lent new meanings to traditional ideas about witches, possession, and malefice and enabled the systematic condemnation of certain groups of people. The ways in which these ideas were mobilized in individual communities and the reasons for doing so varied widely, however, and we will therefore closely examine several specific examples of witch hunts in order to better understand why they were appealing to so many, why they flourished for a time, and why they ultimately faded.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 107 The City: Contested Spaces

What does it mean to live in a city? Can you reshape people’s lives by redesigning city spaces? How do city dwellers, architects, politicians, and others interact with and appropriate their own urban past? This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to different ways of looking at cities, framing them as the contested products of a range of human actions. Through an in-depth examination of four complex urban environments – Chicago, Istanbul, Delhi, and Rome – we will learn about the interplay between space, aesthetics, time, memory, and power. Weekly lectures by an anthropologist, an architect, and a historian will complement discussions of film, historical documents, fiction, and relevant case studies. In addition to writing four short papers, students will hone their analytical skills by observing urban life and form with a series of field studies in the city of Rochester.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 108 History of Mortality

Every human society has had to confront the inevitability and mystery of death. We'll approach the topic from multiple directions, looking at the social history of mortality (including demographics, how social structures influence the experience of dying, and the physical contexts of death) as well as the cultural reactions of ordinary people, philosophers, religious thinkers, and artists. In doing so, we'll pay close attention to how different circumstances and traditions have led to an enormous variety of understandings of and responses to mortality, while also identifying broad similarities across time and throughout the world.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 109 Introduction to Archaeology

This course introduces the student to the field of archaeology through three units of study: 1) The history of excavation from ancient to modern times, 2) The techniques of excavation and the analysis of material remains, 3) Modern theories of cultural interpretation of archaeological sites. We will discuss the value of archaeological approaches to the fields of anthropology, history, architectural and art history, religious and classical studies. Much of the instruction will be illustrated by case studies of sites; although the view will be global, there will be a concentration in Old World material from prehistory to the early modern period. Students will be required to write three essays, with subjects selected from each of the three course units.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 110 The Making of Modern Africa

This course uses film, novel, and historical studies to examine the following themes in the making of modern Africa: the forging of new national identities, creation of wage laborers, and the restructuring of agricultural work, gender, and social age. Students will also explore how African women and men, from their homes and workplaces, and as part of nationalist or national liberation movements during and after the Cold War, have sought to redefine their place in the global economy against the backdrop of new opportunities and challenges presented by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, hunger, international debt, and engagement with China.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 111 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 112 Introduction to African Religions of the Diaspora

This course introduces students to the development of African religions in the Americas, Caribbean, and Canada. Religious traditions such as Africanized Christianity, Santería, Candomblé, Vodun, and Spiritual Baptists will be explored. The course not only provides students with a historical overview of each tradition, but it also explores theological frameworks, doctrinal principles, and ritual activities related to each tradition. Class format includes lectures, discussions, and films.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 113 African Americans in South Africa

When Oprah Winfrey founded a secondary school for girls in post-apartheid Johannesburg, she was following a long tradition of African American solidarity with the equally oppressed black population of South Africa. Forged in the 1780s by black north Atlantic mariners, the solidarity would encompass many areas of life before and during the apartheid era. This course explores four of those areas: evangelical ties connecting African American churches with South Africa’s independent church organizations; the spread of Booker T. Washington’s educational ideals in black South African academic circles; the impact of the Harlem Renaissance on African popular township culture; and the cross-fertilization of political ideologies originating on both sides of the Atlantic: Africans fighting against apartheid learned important lessons from the crusades of anti-colonial activists and internationalists in the diaspora, such as Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, and Mahatma Gandhi.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 115 Doing Anthropology in Rochester

This hands-on, research-oriented course explores the life and work of Lewis Henry Morgan (1818-1881), an attorney and scholar with close ties to the University of Rochester. Morgan published "The League of the Iroquois" and other major works that established anthropology as a field of inquiry in the U.S. Students will work as a team and conduct original research using the Morgan manuscript archive housed in Rush Rhees Library and Morgan's artifact collection at the Rochester Museum & Science Center. Students will also participate in developing a public website and curating a public exhibit to mark Morgan's bicentennial. The course will involve field trips to cultural institutions such as the Seneca Art and Culture Center and the Local History Division of the Rochester Public Library. Open only to First Years and Sophomores.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 116 The Archaeology of Home

Why is there no place like home? What makes home such a special place? Why did the human home evolve? Homes evoke powerful emotions about place and also highlight the dynamic and complex nature of people, their relationships to each other, and the broader society they live in. Archaeologists, therefore, must study the material culture found in and around domestic dwellings in order to identify any reoccurring patterns of those materials to reconstruct their household practices and social relations. This course will focus on the ways that material traces from the past shed light on the diversity of domestic life, which includes household organization; economic strategies; diet and status of families; rituals, and identity. To this end, we will read case studies from household archaeology about all types of homes (mobile shelters to sedentary palaces), but also review key anthropological texts about place-making.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 116A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2014

HIS 117 H

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 118 CITIES & URBANISM IN PRE-COLUMBIAN MESOAMERICAN AND THE ANDES

The discipline of archaeology can make unique contributions to our understanding of urbanism and daily life given its ability to examine long-term processes of development and change. The goal of this course is to provide an introduction and overview of urbanism as exemplified by the indigenous cities of the New World (e.g. Mesoamerica and South America). While regional differences will be discussed, we will focus mainly on identifying the theoretical issues that intersect all of the regions we will be studying.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 119 N/A

No description

HIS 120 Cultural History of Ancient Greece

In this course we will survey the unique military, political, and economic history of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the death of Alexander the Great. In addition, and more unusually, we will look at ancient Greece's rich cultural and social history.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 121 The Roman World

The course offers a comprehensive account of the history of Rome. It first deals with her humble beginnings as a small city-state in central Italy, continuing with the process of Roman hegemony in the Italian peninsula and the Mediterranean world, and ending with the times that led to the fall of the Roman Empire in the west in AD 476. Students will be introduced to the analysis of written and archaeological sources in order to answer the basic question, How do we know about the Romans? Thus, the analysis of the evidence will be the foundation to discuss major topics of Roman civilization. For example, an examination of the city of Pompeii will allow us to reconstruct the daily life of a wealthy Roman city, and the first Roman emperor Augustus' written statement of his own political and military achievements provides us with evidence for the transition from a republican to an imperial form of government.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 122 Medieval Europe

This course introduces students to the world of medieval Europe, roughly 500-1500 C.E. The role of religion will be a central theme in this study of the so-called “Christian Middle Ages,” as well as the ordering structures borrowed and adapted from Roman and so-called barbarian cultures. We will examine how medieval Europeans dealt with social, cultural, and economic change and will study reactions to the “Others” on the margins and in their midst: heretics, Muslims, and Jews. Students will be exposed to some of the principal historical debates about the period, as well as the major types of primary sources available in English translation, and will develop facility in reading, analyzing, and interpreting both primary and secondary sources.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 123 A World Reborn and Reformed: Europe, 1450-1700

The centuries from 1400 to 1800 are often described as the birth of modern Europe. In this course, we will examine this period both as a precursor to our times and on its own terms. We will look both at well-known developments—Renaissance, Reformation, colonization, absolutism, and Enlightenment—and at the ways in which regular people navigated the religious, social, economic, and political transformations that upended their everyday lives. Through these topics, we will determine what is both ‘early’ and ‘modern’ about the period from a variety of perspectives.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 124 Modern Europe

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 125 Vikings

The Viking age lasted a few short centuries and ended a long time ago, approximately in 1100. Who were the Vikings? How did they live? What made them travel such vast distances? In this course we will explore the world of the Vikings, their religious beliefs, family life, technology, law, and literature. We will read their sagas and myths, listen to their music, and watch documentaries that bring to life their ships and villages.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 126 Hitler's Germany

This course revolves around the most essential question in modern German history: was Hitler's regime particular to Germany, German culture, and German society, or was merely the manifestation of an immanent quality in all modern nation states? What does it mean to compare any political figure to Hitler? Was his kind of "evil" suis generis or dangerously banal? This course places the rise and fall of the Nazi Party and Hitler in the longer duree of German history, from the Second Empire and WWI, to Weimar, the Nazi State, and the Two Germanys of the Cold War.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 127 Foundations of Medieval France

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 128 Postwar Europe

Until the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, the past, present, and future of postwar Europe appeared permanently divided, dominated by an inevitable ideological clash. Collapse of the Iron Curtain, however, required a dramatic re-examination, as the once immutable Cold War now appeared more as a post-war parenthesis. This course examines Europe since Zero Hour 1945 as a singular space—one dominated by superpowers, riven by cultural and economic competition, yet also struggling with its past and reimagining its future.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 130 Russian Civilization

Russian Civilization from its beginnings a thousand years ago to the present day. Each unit will cover historical and cultural background as well as literary texts. We will examine important national "myths" (narratives with a variable connection to the historical record) that govern the Russians' understanding of their history and culture, including: the Golden Age of Kiev, Moscow as the Third Rome, and the myths surrounding the city of Petersburg. We will analyze traditional tensions in Russian civilization which prevail today, such as those between: chaos and order, foreign influence and a strong national identity, innovation and tradition, and between radical skepticism and faith. Readings will include: Russian fairy tales and saints' lives, excerpts from the autobiography of the 17th century heretic Avvakum, tales by Pushkin and Gogol, one of Dostoevsky's most powerful and influential novels ("The Devils/Possessed"), and a wide range of materials from the twentieth century. In English.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 131 Russia to 1692

This course focuses on the history of Kievan Rus beginning with the official conversion to Byzantine Christianity (988), the period of Mongol rule over Russia, the rise of the city of Moscow to a dominant position among the Russian principalities, and Muscovite society, politics, and economics in the 1500s and 1600s. We will examine the origins of Russian serfdom and Russian autocracy, Muscovite relations with other societies, including England, the role of witches in Muscovite society, and many other topics. We will also be studying the history of the 'Rus' as it intertwines with the history of two neighboring Slavic peoples, the Poles and Ukrainians.

HIS 132 Imperial Russia

This course examines the history of the Russian Empire from the reign of Peter the Great (1692-1725) to the revolutions of 1917. Students will read primary sources in translation, academic articles, and a survey text. About one-half of class time will be devoted to discussion of the readings. Topics will include Peter's westernization of Russian elites and the costs thereof, the Pugachev rebellion of 1773-1775, the spread of Enlightenment ideals to Russia during the Napoleonic Wars, the abolition of serfdom, Sergei Witte’s industrialization drive, socialist movements in Russia, World War I, and the causes of the revolutions of 1917.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 133 The Russian Revolutions from Lenin to Putin

This class examines the history of the Soviet Union from foundation (1917) to collapse (1991), focusing on internal developments in the Russian part of the Union. We will begin with a discussion of the background to the collapse of the imperial Russian state in 1917, including changes in Russian society and World War I. Later, the class will look at questions such as: Did the New Economic Policy of the 1920s create a stable socioeconomic order? How did Stalin defeat his political rivals and create a personal dictatorship? What were the motivations for the Great Terror of 1937-1938? How did the Soviet Union defeat Nazi Germany in World War II? We will also devote some time to the Soviet role in the Cold War and the appeal of Leninism in colonized and post-colonial societies. The course will conclude with a discussion of the collapse of the USSR and the emergence of a soft authoritarian order in post-Soviet Russia. The syllabus will emphasize primary-source readings and class discussion.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 134 Russia Now

In this expanded 4-credit version of the 2-credit "Russia Now" course, students will follow current events in Russia through print and electronic sources, and write two short essays and one longer research paper.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 135 DANTE'S "DIVINE COMEDY": A JOURNEY FROM INFERNO TO PARADISE, PART I. "INFERNO" AND "PURGATORIO"

The first of a sequence of two, the course approaches "The Divine Comedy" both as a poetic masterpiece and as an encyclopedia of medieval culture. Through a close textual analysis of "Inferno," and the first half of "Purgatorio," students learn how to approach Dante’s poetry as a vehicle for thought, an instrument of self-discovery, and a way to understand and affect the historical reality. They also gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions as they intersect with the multiple levels of Dante’s concern, ranging from literature to history, from politics to government, from philosophy to theology. A visual component, including illustrations of the "Comedy" and multiple artworks pertinent to the narrative, complements the course. Class format includes lectures, discussion, and a weekly recitation session. Intensive class participation is encouraged. Dante I can be taken independently from Dante II. No prerequisites. Freshmen are welcome. Part of the Dante Humanities Cluster.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 136 Dante's Divine Comedy II

Purgatory and Paradise: This course is the second segment of a two-semester sequence on the DIVINE COMEDY. Please see the description for HIS 135 for more details.

HIS 137 History of Poland

The aim of this course is to present a general outline of the cultural, political, as well as social and economic history of Poland in the context of Europe. The complexity of a thousand years of Polish history will be presented in an accessible way. We will also explore the themes of European historical diversity and European identity in the context of Poland.

HIS 137A History of Poland (study abroad)

A survey of Polish history from the Piast dynasty through the period of Jagiellonian rule, the time of the elected kings, 123 years of partitioned Poland, the 1920's and 1930's, World War II, the creation and functioning of the People's Republic, the collapse of the communist system.

Last Offered: Summer 2018

HIS 138 The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Discover the Wonders of a Medieval Mind

This course is the first segment of a two-semester sequence on The Divine Comedy. The purpose of the sequence is to introduce students to the liberal arts through one of the most significant texts in Western civilization. While reading about Dante's adventurous journey from Inferno to Paradise, students will gain a perspective on the Biblical, Christian, and Classical traditions, and on the political, literary, philosophical, and theological dimensions of medieval European culture. The sequence will also provide students with an avenue of investigation on the problem of knowledge--one of the poem's central concerns--and guide them in developing critical tools and research skills. We will begin the course by building a historical and intellectual frame of reference in which to locate THE DIVINE COMEDY. We will then proceed to a close reading of INFERNO and a few cantos of PURGATORY. Lectures and class discussion will be complemented by a weekly recitation session.

HIS 139 History of British India

An introductory survey of the history of India from ancient times to the present, with a special emphasis on the British colonial era and the making of the Indian nation. Course readings will emphasize India's remarkable religious, cultural, and environmental diversity and the challenges and promises that such diversity presents to national identity in the world's most populous democracy. Course format will be an informal mix of lectures, discussions, student presentations, and films.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 140 East Asia to 1600

This course introduces the early history of East Asia, one of the cradles of the world's great civilizations. Join us on a thousand-year journey through traditional China, Korea, and Japan, up to 1600.

Last Offered: Summer 2010

HIS 141 East Asia After 1600

East Asia is vital to our global economy and rapidly changing American society. We need to understand this region more than ever to be the best possible global citizens in the 21st century. This course introduces the modern histories of China, Korea, and Japan from 1600 to the present. Enemies, friends, imitators, and innovators: the countries of East Asia have played all of these roles. The samurai, imperialism in Asia, the Chinese Revolution, and the Korean War are just a few of the topics we will explore. This course is the companion to “HIS 141: East Asia to 1600,” but does not require any prerequisites--just bring your curiosity.

HIS 142 Traditional China

This course focuses on the history of traditional China from antiquity to the 18th century. Two thousand years of civilization, six thousand miles of the Great Wall, a silk road linking China to Rome, and seven maritime voyages sailing across the Pacific and Indian oceans. How have the notions of “China” and “Chinese” civilization transformed over time through cultural diffusion, commercial exchange, and military expansion? How does increased knowledge of Chinese history change our conceptions of Western civilization and the currents of world history? No prior knowledge of Chinese history or language is required for this course. Besides a standard textbook, one academic monograph (Mountain of Fame) and one Chinese classics (Dream of the Red Chamber) will anchor our readings throughout the course.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 143 Modern China, 1600-Present

This class covers the search for modern China in the twentieth century. We will trace how China, between invasion, war, and revolution, transformed from an empire to a republic, from republic to Communist state, and from Communist state to the economic powerhouse that it is today.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 145 Modern Japan

This course covers Japanese history from the 1800s to the present. During these two hundred years, Japan went through a rollercoaster of events: the Meiji Restoration, industrialization, fascism, wars, atomic bombs, an economic miracle, a “lost” decade, and recently a devastating tsunami. The Japanese paradox of Chrysanthemum and Sword still awaits explanation. Come join me in this journey of books, archives, films, and anime in search of modern Japan.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 146 Traditional Japanese Culture

Traces the development of the Japanese cultural tradition through the most prominent examples of its visual, literary, and performing arts. These include the poetry, courtly romances, and scroll painting of the ancient courtiers; the poetry, Noh drama, and ink painting of the medieval samurai and Zen monks; the haiku poetry and art of early modern literati groups; and the poetry, kabuki theater, and print art of the new urban classes. Also examined are architecture, flower arranging, and the artistic complex of the tea ceremony. Emphasis is given to the social contexts of artistic expression.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 148 Religion and Chinese Society

This course examines the complicated relationship between religion and society in China. It takes a sociological approach, emphasizing that religion should be studied as a social phenomena that closely interacts with the development of society at large. The focus is on contemporary times from the end of the 19th century through present. During this period of time, China experienced tremendous change. This course introduces how such change impacted on and was expressed through religion, religiosity, and religious politics.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 150 Colonial Latin America

This introductory survey focuses on the Spanish and Portuguese conquests and colonization of the region that we now know as Latin America. Contrary to popular belief, “the Conquest” was constantly negotiated. Indigenous and African rebels, French and Dutch pirates and religious minorities eroded the Iberian hold on this vast territory. Primary source readings are an important component to this class and will introduce you to the writings of Inca nobles, Spanish conquistadors, and free African merchants. As a result, our course focuses on the vibrant societies defined as much by their cultural mixture as by their inherent political, social and economic inequality. The course ends with a brief glimpse at the Latin American independence movements. No prior knowledge of Latin American history or Spanish/Portuguese language is necessary for this course.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 151 Modern Latin America

This introductory survey course will cover the difficult process of nation-building that twenty-odd societies south of the Rio Grande experienced during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 152 History of Mexico

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 153 History of Brazil, 1500-2009

This introductory course will highlight major institutions, events and trends as Brazil transitioned from a rural, slave society to a highly urbanized society with one of the world’s most promising economies. Divided into three periods, the course first considers how Portuguese, African and indigenous institutions and traditions molded the colonial period, where sugar and then gold dominated Brazil’s economy. The second part begins with Brazil’s independence from Portugal in 1822 and covers the persistence of slavery, the introduction of railroads, European immigration and the importance of coffee during the Brazilian Empire. The third part of the course shows how samba, Carnaval, industrialization, and futebol as well as underdevelopment, dictatorships, and favelas define modern Brazilian history.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 154 History of Latin America through Soccer

In this course, we will use soccer as a lens to study the development of modern Latin American history, culture and politics. British immigrants first introduced “the beautiful game” to Argentina in 1867, yet at the time soccer was viewed as a bizarre, violent, and foreign fad. This course will trace the trajectory of both the sport and the Latin American societies that received and molded soccer into the cultural force that it is today. Soccer has been used to fabricate national identities, promote multi-racial societies, and, of course, entertain the masses. We will explore these facets of its impact on twentieth-century Latin American history, while acknowledging the more odious use of the sport in upholding dictatorships, drug trafficking and misogyny. No prior knowledge of soccer or Latin American history is required.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 155 Film as History: Modern Latin America

This introductory course uses film to understand several trends and elements central to Latin American society and culture in the twentieth century. Specifically, the class will be structured around five main themes: Latin America and the United States; Class, Race and Gender; Revolution and Repression; Underdevelopment and Informality; and Religion. By the end of the course, students will have a strong introduction to Latin American modern history and understand the role films, as well as other sources, play in our perception of history.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 156 A Communist Country on America's Doorsteps: Cuba from Columbus to the Present

While the socioeconomic and political situation in Cuba has changed considerably since the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the process of normalizing relations with the United States is in progress, Cuba has been for many decades a communist country just 90 miles away from American shores. This course traces the complex historical developments which gave rise to this situation and discusses the grave repercussions. The course examines the evolution of socioeconomic and political interest groups in colonial Spanish Cuba and the subsequent American entanglement in the internal historical processes in Cuba, with far-reaching unintended consequences, particularly, the ultimate involvement of the Soviet Union, which brought Cuba to the center of the Cold War between the supper powers.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 157 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 158 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 159 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2013

HIS 160 American Political History to 1865

A survey  of the history of the North American continent from its peopling and colonial rivalry to the founding of the United States, its development, and eventual Civil War. Topics include international competition, economic growth, the role of slavery, and political conflict.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 161 American Political History, 1865 - 1990

A study of the changing use of power from the end of the Civil War until the election of Bill Clinton. Among the topics under investigation is the role of changing nature of the party system, the role of race and gender in voting and governing, and the efforts to alter the basis of American political life.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 162 Early America to 1783

This course examines European expansion into the Americas from Columbus’s first voyage through the end of the American Revolution. Throughout, we will consider the making of a multi-national and multi-ethnic Atlantic world including Africa, Europe, and America as a broader context for situating the development of colonial British America and the infant United States. The course surveys the expansion of different European empires into the Americas, comparatively profiles Anglo-Indian contact, slavery and the emergence of African-American culture, gender, science, religion, and daily life within British America, and conclude by examining the political and ideological crises of the American Revolution and struggles within the new United States to forge a politically and culturally cohesive republic in the 1780s.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 163 Revolutionary America, 1750-1800

No description

HIS 164 Democratic America, 1783-1865

Jefferson, Jackson, party formation, popular culture, and sectionalism.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 165 Industrial America, 1865-1929

Changes in national life brought about by the sustained expansion of American industry.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 166 Liberal America, 1929-1973

This course is an examination of the development of American politics, society, and culture between the onset of the Great Depression and the Watergate scandal. It focuses on the creation and consolidation of the "New Deal order"—a liberal political economy centered on a constrained corporate capitalism, a modest welfare state, and a national security apparatus designed to wage the Cold War and extend American power abroad.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 167 Postindustrial America, 1973-Present

Examines American politics, society, and culture since 1973. Focus is on the deindustrialization of the economy, the revitalization of conservatism, the "culture wars," the end of the Cold War and post-Cold War foreign affairs--including the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq--, and the collapse of bipartisan policy-making.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 167K N/A

No description

HIS 168 Introduction to American Politics

When did some states turn blue--and others red--in presidential elections? What are the origins of the modern Congress, including the filibuster-prone Senate and a House run by its majority party? Why did politicians begin to campaign for the presidency, rather than waiting on their front porches for voters to appear? How did voting rights--and other rights of citizenship--expand, then narrow, then expand again, over time? Drawing broadly on historical as well as contemporary evidence, this course will introduce students to the foundations of American government. We will examine political institutions as well as the linkages that connect institutions, political leaders, and ordinary citizens. This course is appropriate for majors and non-majors with an interest in understanding how and why the American political system works as it does.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 169 Introduction to African American Studies

Drawing on the disciplines of History, Anthropology, and Psychology, this course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary approach to the examination of the black experience in America.

HIS 170 African-American History I to 1900

After a brief review of the primary features of pre-European African society, we will examine the affect of the "Middle Passage" -- the transportation of enslaved Africans to the Western Hemisphere. We will then focus on the process of "Americanization"; as the Africans became African-Americans. The struggle for freedom and citizenship will conclude our survey. The main course readings will be a representative sample of African-American autobiographies, and short selections from a secondary text. Using the autobiographies as historical source material, we will produce a brief history of the values and cultural practices of Africans in America, and the ways in which African-Americans adapted to and shaped American life and society.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 171 African-American History II since 1900

No description

HIS 172 History of Jazz

This study of Jazz, as an American musical art form, will be structured around the lives and music of jazz musicians, across a range of instrumental, vocal, and ensemble genres. Course focuses on jazz titans, those individuals and musical groups distinguished by their seminal and permanent influences, such as Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, or Coleman Hawkins or shorter intense careers, such as Charlie Parker. Blues, ragtime, swing, bebop, cool, progressive, and free jazz are landmark terms. And finally, study of the musical history will be enhanced by considerations from sociological, linguistic, and philosophical perspectives. The instructional format includes lectures, discussion and intense emphasis on listening. This course is designed for students with little or no musical training; simple technical, musical vocabulary and concepts will be provided. Reading, listening assignments, brief written assignments and two exams. No prerequisites.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 172B History of Jazz II

This course will focus on Jazz music and musicians in the latter half of the 20th century (ca. 1955-2000). We will investigate the relationship of Jazz to the following topics: new musical styles, other art forms, changes in American society, technological developments, and the evolution of recording, broadcast, and news media. In doing so, we will consider not only musicians who first emerged as leaders during this period (Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea, Wynton Marsalis, John Scofield), but also those whose careers began earlier (Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, Gil Evans) and continued into the 1950s and beyond. We will also examine how repertoire from previous historical periods came to be viewed by subsequent generations. The instructional format includes lectures and discussion along with in-class viewings/listenings of recorded performances. This course is designed for students with little to no musical training.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 173 The Blues

The blues from its earliest forms to recent developments. It is both a history and a cultural studies course, and the Monday class and the Wednesday class will have different focuses on this account. The primary focus of the Monday class will be historical, examining the music and its development in chronological terms. The primary focus of the Wednesday class will be cultural topics, continuing themes in the music and the lyrics, its reception in American society, and we will trace these by moving back and forth in time. Among the important topics and themes will be race, religion and sexuality; the economic effects of the music industry on the blues and the people who played them, the reception of the blues in African-American culture, and later among white Americans. The goal of the course is to explore the great influence of the blues on American culture. Musical aspects of the blues will also be covered: its peculiar structure and characteristic scales, but no musical knowledge is presumed or needed.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 174 American Military History

American history has been largely shaped by wars. This course will survey the history of American wars; the military, naval, and civil institutions that have been created to serve the changing needs of national defense; and the citizen-soldiers who have preserved the liberty of the Republic.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 175 Religion in America

Leaning heavily on primary sources, this course surveys the history and ethnography of religion in the United States. Special attention will be given to personal experiences of the divine, political strife and social reform, tensions between sectarianism and pluralism, and the extraordinary religious history of western New York.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 177 AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY

Historical survey of religions as practiced by people of African descent living in North America. Christianity, Islam, and African-derived religions will be examined. Through its canvassing of doctrinal and ritual frameworks, students are afforded an opportunity to view the diverse and complex terrain of African American religion. Class format includes lectures, discussions, and film/music.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 179 Rochester and Western New York

The vast territory of the new United States was doubled by the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, emphasizing the necessity of breaking the Appalachian barrier to reach the new Mississippi River basin. The Erie Canal achieved this goal in 1825, facilitating transport of goods and people. Rochester grew from a small settlement in 1811 to become “the first American city” due to its location on the canal, the power generated by the High Falls of the Genesee River, and the agricultural bounty of the Genesee Valley. Waves of immigrants passed through and many stayed to enjoy social, religious, and economic freedoms in the new community. Railroads and highways followed the original canal route while new industries met the needs of a growing nation. In recent decades the region’s economy has transformed from manufacturing to education, medicine, and technology, but high rates of poverty have persisted despite robust amelioration efforts.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 180 History of Technology

This course surveys the history of technology and its impacts on agriculture, communication, transportation, housing, health, war and society. Technology has been used to build empires and improve human societies, but also to destroy, enslave, and censor. Today we face limits on technology as well as new and seemingly boundless opportunities for the future. The unifying theme of the course is exploring and understanding the impact of technology on individuals.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 182 Speaking Stones

This course will examine grave stones and funerary architecture in Rochester's historic Mt. Hope Cemetery. Students will be introduced to western funeral ritual and practice, with a particular focus on funerary architecture and cemeteries in the United States, and the place of graves and graveyards in popular fiction and culture. Then they will examine the iconography and epigraphy of graves and funerary monuments in terms of their function of forging symbolic connections among the living and the dead. Case studies will be drawn from Mt. Hope Cemetery, which will further serve to illuminate both Rochester's history, and American religious belief and practice.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 183 History of Christianity I

The purpose of this course is to explore the general development of Christianity throughout its twenty centuries of existence, paying special attention to the religious presuppositions behind Christianity and its complex relationship to its socio-cultural matrix. The course will focus on important moments in Christian history, including its inception as a Jewish religious movement set in motion by Jesus, its dissemination in the Greco-Roman world by Paul of Tarsus, its growth and triumph in the Roman Empire, the split between the Greek- and Latin-speaking churches, medieval Catholicism, the Reformation and rise of Protestantism, Christianity and the modern world, and contemporary movements and tendencies within the Christian churches.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 184 History of Islam

This course will trace the development of the religion of Islam from its origins in the Qur'an and Muhammad's teachings, through the codification of the classical tradition in its various forms, and finally to the living Islam of the contemporary world.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 185 A History of the Future: Millennial Visions in Film and Literature

Through literature and film, this course examines how people at various points in the past have imagined our future--and the ways in which those "millennial visions" were conditioned by specific historical contexts. The course looks at both positive and negative views of the future, and at secular as well as religious predictions for humankind's fate, asking always how our visions of the future, like a fun-house mirror, reflect in sometimes monstrous or exaggerated terms the concerns of the present.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 186 History of Energy Resources and Utilization

This will cover the broad history of energy from ancient civilizations using various resources for heat and power through the introduction of coal that sparked the industrial revolution, the exploitation of petroleum and natural gas in the late 19th century, and followed by the nuclear age. Today we are seeing a growth realization that renewable resources and conservation have important roles to play in powering civilization.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 187 Science, Magic, and the Occult from Antiquity to Newton

This course explores the early history of humans' attempts to explain and control the cosmos, taking into account the real contributions made to early science by areas of inquiry now dismissed as magic or superstition, such as astrology, alchemy, and "natural magic." One major theme of the course will be the continuing way in which societies have policed the boundary between what they define as "magic" and what they dub legitimate "science." What is legitimate knowledge about nature, and who gets to define what counts as legitimate? The course will end around 1700, with Newton and the so-called "Scientific Revolution," and the marginalization of astrology, alchemy and similar fields of inquiry as "pseudo-sciences" or popular error.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 188 SEX AND POWER

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship of Gender, Sexuality and Women's studies. As a survey course, this class is designed to give students from diverse backgrounds and disciplines a basic understanding of debates and perspectives discussed in the field. We will use gender as a critical lens to examine some of the social, cultural, economic, scientific, and political practices that organize our lives. We will explore a multitude of feminist perspective on the intersections of sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, religion, and other categories of identity. In this course, we will interrogate these categories as socially constructed while acknowledging that these constructions have real effects in subordinating groups, marking bodies, and creating structural, intersectional inequalities.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 189 Wives. Witches, and Wenches: Women in American History

This course surveys American history through the words and work of women. Well-known historical events and developments--including but not limited to the Revolutionary War, the abolition of slavery, the Great Depression, and the protest movements of the 1960s—look different when considered from the perspective of women. The course will further examine how social categories such as race, class, sexuality, and religion have shaped women’s historical experiences. Broad in chronological scope, this course is not intended to be comprehensive. Rather, we will utilize primary and secondary sources to delve into important historical moments and to explore questions about the practice and politics of studying women’s history.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 191 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2019

HIS 192 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2019

HIS 193Q N/A

No description

HIS 194 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2018

HIS 194Q N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 195Q N/A

No description

HIS 196 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 197Q N/A

No description

HIS 198Q N/A

No description

HIS 199Q N/A

No description

HIS 200 Gateway to History

History 200 is an introduction to historical practice – what professional historians actually do. It is a requirement for history majors, but we encourage all interested undergraduates to enroll.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 201 New Perspectives in Global History

Part I examines the origins of colonialism and “underdevelopment” in the global South as an outcome of the crisis in European feudalism, the rise of capitalism, and the Industrial Revolution in the global North. Progress in the North and not in the South were but two sides of the same process; a view of the North-South that remains largely unchallenged in the recent past, notwithstanding dramatic shifts in the world system during the same period. The dissolution of the Soviet Union, which has profoundly shaped international politics in the past two decades, has not by itself generated an alternative to this understanding of global history. Part II shows how the emergence of China, Brazil, India, and several other countries as economic power houses, competing for world resources and markets with the US-led global North, has not only altered the world’s living standards; it has also inspired new interpretations, rivaling the view that privileges social revolution in the fight for economic independence.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 202 Health, Medicine, and Social Reform

Examination of the interconnected histories of medical science, public health, and political action promoting social and health reform, from the seventeenth century to the present. Attention will also be directed to connections between socio-economic and occupational status and health status, variations in the distribution of disease and risk, and changes in the social role of medicine and medical institutions. The course material includes both major primary sources (Frank, Chadwick, Engels, Virchow, Riis, and Geiger) and secondary analyses (by Rosen, McKeown, Navarro, Jones, and E.R. Brown). Course requirements: a midterm exam, a final exam, and a 7-page book review essay. Each will contribute to one-third of the final grade..

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 202W Health, Medicine, and Social Reform

Examination of the interconnected histories of medical science, public health, and political action promoting social and health reform, from the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century to the present. Attention will also be directed to improvements in health status, variations in the distribution of disease and risk, and changes in the social role of medicine and medical institutions. The material includes major primary sources: Frank, Engels,Virchow, Riis, Hamilton, Sigerist, Geiger. Secondary readings will include Rosen's A HISTORY OF PUBLIC HEALTH, and Jones' BAD BLOOD.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 203 Changing Concepts of Health and Illness

The long-term intellectual history of essential ideas in the Western medical tradition: illness, health, and mind/body interaction. The time span ranges from Greek antiquity to the present day, with emphasis on the last 250 years and on the relationship between emotional and biological factors in the onset and experience of disease. Primary sources include Hippocrates, Galen, Maimonides, Descartes, Gaub, Charcot, Freud, Alexander, Cannon, Engel. Secondary sources include Porter's THE GREATEST BENEFIT TO MANKIND: A MEDICAL HISTORY OF HUMANITY.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 203W Changing Concepts of Health and Illness

The long-term intellectual history of essential ideas in the Western medical tradition: illness, health, and mind/body interaction. The time span ranges from Greek antiquity to the present day, with emphasis on the last 250 years and on the relationship between emotional and biological factors in the onset and experience of disease. Primary sources include Hippocrates, Galen, Maimonides, Descartes, Gaub, Charcot, Freud, Alexander, Cannon, Engel. Secondary sources include Porter's THE GREATEST BENEFIT TO MANKIND: A MEDICAL HISTORY OF HUMANITY.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 204 History of International and Global Health

Examines the initiation, evolution, and transformation of international and global health activities/policies focusing on developments in the 19th-early 21st centuries. It also considers events such as pandemic plague, exchange of diseases between the Old World and the New, and the role of health concerns in early European and American colonialism and imperialism. The major focus is the evolution of cooperative efforts in international health under governmental, non-governmental, and trans-governmental auspices with attention given to the role of international conferences/conventions, the work of the International Red Cross and the Rockefeller Foundations International Health Division, and the creation/functioning of the Pan American Health Organization, the Office International d'Hygiene Publique, the League of Nations Health Organization, and the World Health Organization. For the later 20th century, we will focus on the World Bank, the Gates Foundation, UNAIDS, and other current players in global health.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 204W History of International and Global Health

Examines the initiation, evolution, and transformation of international and global health activities/policies focusing on developments in the 19th-early 21st centuries. It also considers events such as pandemic plague, exchange of diseases between the Old World and the New, and the role of health concerns in early European and American colonialism and imperialism. The major focus is the evolution of cooperative efforts in international health under governmental, non-governmental, and trans-governmental auspices with attention given to the role of international conferences/conventions, the work of the International Red Cross and the Rockefeller Foundations International Health Division, and the creation/functioning of the Pan American Health Organization, the Office International d'Hygiene Publique, the League of Nations Health Organization, and the World Health Organization. For the later 20th century, we will focus on the World Bank, the Gates Foundation, UNAIDS, and other current players in global health.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 205 Islam and the Third World

This course will study some of the important and often dramatic changes occurring in modern Islam by examining the effects on it of Third World political, social, and economic factors. Case studies will be drawn from contemporary Muslim societies but placed in context of similar situations involving other religious traditions in South America, Africa, and South Asia.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 205W Islam and the Third World

This course will study some of the important and often dramatic changes occurring in modern Islam by examining the effects on it of Third World political, social, and economic factors. Case studies will be drawn from contemporary Muslim societies but placed in context of similar situations involving other religious traditions in South America, Africa, and South Asia.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 206 Dangerous Texts: Literature and Politics in Russia

The course examines "dangerous texts" from the 17th c. to the present to see how texts and authors were seen as threats to the state and explores ways in which writers perceived themselves as a "second government" and how this affected their writing. Readings include Avvakum, Radishchev, Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Mandelstam, Solzhenitsyn, Voinovich, and Sinyavsky/Tertz.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 206W Dangerous Texts: Literature and Politics in Russia

The course examines "dangerous texts" from the 17th c. to the present to see how texts and authors were seen as threats to the state and explores ways in which writers perceived themselves as a "second government" and how this affected their writing. Readings include Avvakum, Radishchev, Pushkin, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Mandelstam, Solzhenitsyn, Voinovich, and Sinyavsky/Tertz.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 207 Archaeology of the African Diaspora

The course will examine the nature and culture of the African Diaspora as found on the African continent, Europe, the Americas and elsewhere. Among key issues on which the course will focus are variability, continuity and change in the cultures of different groups of Diasporan Africans, and relationships that are found between major environmental challenges as well as historical events such as the Islamic Jihads, Trans-Saharan Trade, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, colonialism, and Plantation Slavery in West Africa and the relocation and redistribution of African populations in Africa. A critical component of this class examines the historical, ethnographic, and archaeological research done in Africa, Europe, and the Americas to inform the student about theories and interpretations concerning the African Diaspora.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 208 Comparative Modern Revolutions: France, Japan, Mexico, Russia

In this class we will compare the French Revolution (1789-1815), the Japanese Meiji Revolution (usually called in English "the Restoration") of 1868-1890, the Mexican Revolution (1910-1924), and the Russian Revolution (1917-1937). We will examine such questions as: To what extent did particular social groups drive each of these revolutions? To what extent did each of these revolutions begin with a simple collapse of the state? Were new ideologies/ideas important in bringing on each revolution? How important were efforts "from below" and "from above" ( i.e. by established elites and/or new state apparatuses) in determining the outcome of each revolution? Do modern revolutions tend to follow a common course, as Crane Brinton has argued, or are they 'sui generis'?

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 208W Comparative Modern Revolutions: France, Japan, Mexico, Russia

In this class we will compare the French Revolution (1789-1815), the Japanese Meiji Revolution (usually called in English "the Restoration") of 1868-1890, the Mexican Revolution (1910-1924), and the Russian Revolution (1917-1937). We will examine such questions as: To what extent did particular social groups drive each of these revolutions? To what extent did each of these revolutions begin with a simple collapse of the state? Were new ideologies/ideas important in bringing on each revolution? How important were efforts "from below" and "from above" ( i.e. by established elites and/or new state apparatuses) in determining the outcome of each revolution? Do modern revolutions tend to follow a common course, as Crane Brinton has argued, or are they 'sui generis'?

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 209 Corruption and the Global Economy in Historical Perspective

This junior seminar offers students the opportunity to research and discuss the operation and consequences of widespread corruption in the global economy and the complex historical processes – economic, social, and political – which help to explain the phenomenon. To make the seminar a well-focused course, discussion will focus on country-case studies (with about three selected individuals in each country) that help to demonstrate the general pattern of causes and effects. A major issue to consider, among other things, is the role of cut-throat competition among global corporations and the effects of their corrupt activities on the quality of governance.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 209W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 210 Africa Welcomes China in a New Global Economy

Part I surveys major areas of interaction between Africans and the Chinese from the end of WWII to the present. Initially, Africans found in China an ally in their struggles for liberation from European colonialism and Western imperialism. Beginning in the late 1980s, the ties broadened to include educational and cultural exchanges, economic aid, and especially trade and investment. Part II places the above connections in historical and global contexts. A global perspective invites students to see that from the perspective of China, the central features of its ties with Africa today are not structurally different from its dealings with other regions of the world. China has, for example, fueled its rapid economic growth with raw materials from every corner of the globe, including coal from the United States. Research also shows that Africans are acutely aware of the historical significance of China’s appearance on the global scene; the rise has given Africans a world of options they had never enjoyed before.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 210W Africa Welcomes China in a New Global Economy

Part I surveys major areas of interaction between Africans and the Chinese from the end of WWII to the present. Initially, Africans found in China an ally in their struggles for liberation from European colonialism and Western imperialism. Beginning in the late 1980s, the ties broadened to include educational and cultural exchanges, economic aid, and especially trade and investment. Part II places the above connections in historical and global contexts. A global perspective invites students to see that from the perspective of China, the central features of its ties with Africa today are not structurally different from its dealings with other regions of the world. China has, for example, fueled its rapid economic growth with raw materials from every corner of the globe, including coal from the United States. Research also shows that Africans are acutely aware of the historical significance of China’s appearance on the global scene; the rise has given Africans a world of options they had never enjoyed before.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 211 Guns, War, and Revolution in Southern Africa

The peoples of southern Africa’s fifteen states (about 290 million in 2010) freed themselves from European colonialism in two different ways. In some countries, Africans pursued, from the time of World War II, a nationalist agenda whose principal aim was to gain political independence. In other colonies, however, frustrated nationalists became revolutionaries, determined to achieve both political and economic autonomy. With the support of peasants and workers, the radicalized leadership launched “people’s wars” that had by the 1970s turned portions of southern Africa into bloody battlefields as guerrillas clashed with government forces in the jungle and air.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 211W Guns, War, and Revolution in Southern Africa

The peoples of southern Africa’s fifteen states (about 290 million in 2010) freed themselves from European colonialism in two different ways. In some countries, Africans pursued, from the time of World War II, a nationalist agenda whose principal aim was to gain political independence. In other colonies, however, frustrated nationalists became revolutionaries, determined to achieve both political and economic autonomy. With the support of peasants and workers, the radicalized leadership launched “people’s wars” that had by the 1970s turned portions of southern Africa into bloody battlefields as guerrillas clashed with government forces in the jungle and air.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 212 Africa's Sleeping Giant: Nigeria since the Islamic Revolution of 1804

In the context of the global economy, Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, is blessed with vast mineral resources and agricultural lands able to produce a wide variety of tropical products and foods. The country's large population is made up of talented and highly resourceful individuals, who are quick to respond to economic incentives. Thus, it is hard to understand why the country has one of the lowest per capita incomes in the world and why the country's economy occupies such a lowly position within the global economy. We focus on the historical development of socio-economic/political structures over time to explain why the giant of Africa continues to slumber. Some of the country's central problems, such as ethnic and religious contradictions, are similar in some way to those in the U.S. The solutions attempted by the governments of both countries, such as affirmative action, are also somewhat similar. We will conduct a comparative analysis of contemporary historical issues in the two countries.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 213 Natural Disasters and History in Africa

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2018

HIS 213W Natural Disasters and History in Africa

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 214 Resistance Literature Across the Middle East

This course examines a series of literary, philosophical, visual, and cinematic texts in order to investigate the relationship between art, power, and resistance in the context of human rights struggles in the Middle East and North Africa. Larger questions of global peace, human rights, solidarity, and activism in post 9/11 era will be inseparable from our discussions of modernity, nationalism, orientalism, Islam & Sufism, censorship, detention camps, refugee crisis, exile, and incarceration. The goal of this course is thus to offer students of social sciences insights into how literary works represent and negotiate historical and political questions in writing, and inversely, to encourage students of humanities to read and think politically.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 215 Archaeology of West Africa

The course will enable the student to understand the inception of present-day complex societies of West Africa and how they evolved, and their vicissitudes in the period 500 B.C. to A.D. 1950. Themes include general characteristics of West African societies in the Iron Age, origins of copper and iron technology and their effects on local societies, megalith and tumuli sites of the Western Sudan, urbanism, and trade networks and contacts in West Africa

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 215W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 216 Early Civilizations of Africa

The course will examine the environmental, social and cultural dynamics that led to urbanism and other aspects of cultural transformation in Africa before the advent of European colonialism. Topics include concepts of civilization, civilization of Africa, including those of the Nile Valley, the Horn of Africa, the Western Sudan, Zimbabwe, the Inland Niger Delta and the West African Rainforest. The role of the peripheries in the development of these centres will be looked at.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 217 Prehistory of Ancient Peru: The Incas and Their Ancestors

From Machu Picchu to the geoglyphs on the Nasca desert, the Andean region of South America has a long and rich pre-Columbian history. This course will survey the archaeological approaches to understanding the development of Andean cultures that ranges from hunter-gatherers to the Inca Empire. Some of the prehistoric cultures we will be examining include Caral, Chavin, Nasca, Wari, and the Inca. This will class will also discuss plant and animal domestication, inequality, gender, ceramics, urbanization, and the rise and fall of states and empires.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 218 Unequal Development and State Policy:  Brazil, the US, and Nigeria

The 2010 Brazilian national census shows 97.2 million Afro-Brazilians and 90.6 million Whites. These two ethnic nationalities have developed unequally since the establishment of colonial Brazil by Portugal in the sixteenth century. The 2010 census shows the average income of Afro-Brazilians was less than half that of White Brazilians. In 2009, the wealth gap between White and Black American families was $236,500. The most populous African nation, Nigeria, shows similar inequality among its major ethnic nationalities. This magnitude of inequality among ethnic nationalities has given rise to serious problems in inter-group relations in the three countries. This course aims to trace, comparatively, the historical origins of the phenomenon, examine the political and economic consequences, and discuss the politics and economics of state policy designed to address it. *NOTE: Students taking this Course for ECO credit must have previously taken ECO 108*

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 219 Animal Histories

This course examines the changing historical relationships between homo sapiens and other animal species from prehistory to the present. We will be concerned with how and why the relationship between humans and animals has changed from one defined by predator-prey relations to one of use-oriented dependence. We will attempt to work out how the current relationship between humans and animals came about through a dynamic historical process, with the ultimate goal of understanding that relationship in its proper historical context. The primary method of instruction will be seminar discussions of the readings.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 219W Animal Histories

This course examines the changing historical relationships between homo sapiens and other animal species from prehistory to the present. We will be concerned with how and why the relationship between humans and animals has changed from one defined by predator-prey relations to one of use-oriented dependence. We will attempt to work out how the current relationship between humans and animals came about through a dynamic historical process, with the ultimate goal of understanding that relationship in its proper historical context. The primary method of instruction will be seminar discussions of the readings.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 220 Ethnoarchaeology of Africa

Ethnoarchaeology is the ethnographic study of peoples for archaeological reasons, usually through the study of the material remains of a society. Ethnoarchaeology aids archaeologists in reconstructing ancient lifeways by studying the material and non-material traditions of modern societies. This course will examine ethnoarchaeological work in Africa that is sensitive to the daily realities of peoples’ lives while it simultaneously builds the types of knowledge necessary for ethnoarchaeology to meet its important cognitive role within archaeological research. Examples will be drawn from research with potters and consumers, iron smelters, pastoralists, artists, and ethno-pharmacologists in West Africa, Southern Africa, and Eastern Africa. The course will guide the student to understand what ethnoarchaeology is, and to acquire skills, which would enable her or him to practice it. Lectures will be combined with class discussions of specific case studies.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 221 20th Century European Thought

This course is an introduction to the main currents of European thought in the twentieth century--a century historian Eric Hobsbawm has rightly termed the "Age of Extremes." Focusing on shifting and competing conceptions of selfhood and society, it will place modern European culture and the intellectuals who forged it within the context of the ordeals of two world wars; a host of revolutions (scientific, sexual, Bolshevik, fascist, and "velvet"); the Holocaust and Cold War; the collapse of European colonialism; and the expansion of American empire. We will center on French and German thought, but other regions of the modern European mind - British, Italian, Polish, Czech, émigré American - will also weigh in.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 223 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 223W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 224 The South and the World

“Tell about the South,” demands Shreve McCannon in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Was the “Old South” a region stuck in time, anti-modern, anti-North and anti-black” or was it, as historians have recently suggested, “an active participant in, and even a promoter of, change and progress?” This course will examine the many roles, nationally and internationally (real and imagined) played by the Old and New South.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 224W The South and the World

“Tell about the South,” demands Shreve McCannon in William Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! Was the “Old South” a region stuck in time, anti-modern, anti-North and anti-black” or was it, as historians have recently suggested, “an active participant in, and even a promoter of, change and progress?” This course will examine the many roles, nationally and internationally (real and imagined) played by the Old and New South.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 225 Europe and the Great War, 1914-1918

This course is an introduction to the history of Europe during the First World War. After a preliminary look at the details of the conflict itself, we will be concerned mainly with the effect of the war on European culture, society, and consciousness. Class sessions to include both lectures, films, and regular discussions. Reading to include: Robert Graves, GOOD-BYE TO ALL THAT; Vera Britain, TESTAMENT OF YOUTH; Erich Maria Remarque, ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT; the poems of Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and others; Alistair Horne, THE PRICE OF GLORY; and Paul Fussell, THE GREAT WAR AND MODERN MEMORY.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 225W Europe and the Great War, 1914-1919

This course is an introduction to the history of Europe during the First World War. After a preliminary look at the details of the conflict itself, we will be concerned mainly with the effect of the war on European culture, society, and consciousness. Class sessions to include both lectures, films, and regular discussions. Reading to include: Robert Graves, GOOD-BYE TO ALL THAT; Vera Britain, TESTAMENT OF YOUTH; Erich Maria Remarque, ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT; the poems of Wilfred Owen, Siegfried Sassoon, and others; Alistair Horne, THE PRICE OF GLORY; and Paul Fussell, THE GREAT WAR AND MODERN MEMORY.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 226 History of Friendship

The course is an exploration of the history of friendship focusing on the 19th century and the United States. We will consider friendships between women, between men, and cross-gender friendships; we will also discuss love letters and letters of courtship. To the extent possible, we will look at friendships among children in the years between 1820 and 1870, and between children and adults. We will read and discuss several famous friendships from that era--e. g., Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, the poet Emily Dickinson and her childhood friend and ultimately sister-in-law Susan Dickinson--and use the family correspondence from the Seward Family Archive digital humanities project as our core primary-source evidence for arriving at a historically and culturally situated definition of friendship and the nature of epistolary relationships.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 226W History of Friendship

The course is an exploration of the history of friendship focusing on the 19th century and the United States. We will consider friendships between women, between men, and cross-gender friendships; we will also discuss love letters and letters of courtship. To the extent possible, we will look at friendships among children in the years between 1820 and 1870, and between children and adults. We will read and discuss several famous friendships from that era--e. g., Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, the poet Emily Dickinson and her childhood friend and ultimately sister-in-law Susan Dickinson--and use the family correspondence from the Seward Family Archive digital humanities project as our core primary-source evidence for arriving at a historically and culturally situated definition of friendship and the nature of epistolary relationships.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 227 Podcasting History: Hear UR

This team-taught class will explore the life and works of the father of modern taxidermy, Carl Akeley, who trained in Rochester. Akeley rose to fame in the early 20th century as the designer of the taxidermy animals in New York's American Museum of Natural History. In lieu of writing a final research paper, students will team up to create a podcast series. Based in part on documents at the University's department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 227W Podcasting History: Hear UR

This team-taught class will explore the life and works of the father of modern taxidermy, Carl Akeley, who trained in Rochester. Akeley rose to fame in the early 20th century as the designer of the taxidermy animals in New York's American Museum of Natural History. In lieu of writing a final research paper, students will team up to create a podcast series. Based in part on documents at the University's department of Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 228 North Africa and the Middle East since 1838

North Africa and the Middle East is in a mess: Instead of democracy, the Arab Spring delivered a military dictatorship to Egypt; Iraq and Syria are melting into warring tribal enclaves; Saudi Arabia is waging a savage war in Yemen; and the Palestinians remain an unprotected stateless people. There is a crisis, and this course introduces students to the predicament, arguing that since the first Industrial Revolution in England, the peoples of North Africa and the Middle East have refashioned their destinies in partnership with the West. Students will examine how the following encounters helped make the region as we know it: the Anglo-Turkish Convention of 1838, transition from Ottoman to West European colonialism, discovery of huge and easily extractable oil reserves, creation of the state of Israel, the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the US Invasion of Iraq in 2003. The class will also explore how the above patterns of engagement shaped the histories of the region’s working classes, women, and the peasantry.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 228W North Africa and the Middle East since 1838

North Africa and the Middle East is in a mess: Instead of democracy, the Arab Spring delivered a military dictatorship to Egypt; Iraq and Syria are melting into warring tribal enclaves; Saudi Arabia is waging a savage war in Yemen; and the Palestinians remain an unprotected stateless people. There is a crisis, and this course introduces students to the predicament, arguing that since the first Industrial Revolution in England, the peoples of North Africa and the Middle East have refashioned their destinies in partnership with the West. Students will examine how the following encounters helped make the region as we know it: the Anglo-Turkish Convention of 1838, transition from Ottoman to West European colonialism, discovery of huge and easily extractable oil reserves, creation of the state of Israel, the Iranian Revolution of 1979, and the US Invasion of Iraq in 2003. The class will also explore how the above patterns of engagement shaped the histories of the region’s working classes, women, and the peasantry.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 229 England and Ireland since 1500

This course is an introductory survey of the tragically intermingled histories of England and Ireland from the end of the Napoleonic Wars to the present. Main topics include the effects of the Wars on England and Ireland; industrialization (and the lack thereof); class conflict in the 1830s and 40s; the Great Famine; the Irish emigration; Liberalism; Irish Nationalism and the IRA; the Depression; the two world wars, etc. Course consists of lectures, small-group discussions, and a few films.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 229W England and Ireland since 1500

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 230 Arthur and Robin Hood: History from Myth

King Arthur and Robin Hood, though so popular a feature in our culture that we almost take them as 'givens,' in fact we pay serious study about them. Medieval stories can inform us about Kingship, ideas of chivalry, socio-economic oppression and resistance, the growth and functioning of early legal systems. This course looks at such early stories within the context of their historical periods.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 230W Arthur and Robin Hood: History from Myth

King Arthur and Robin Hood, though so popular a feature in our culture that we almost take them as 'givens,' in fact we pay serious study about them. Medieval stories can inform us about Kingship, ideas of chivalry, socio-economic oppression and resistance, the growth and functioning of early legal systems. This course looks at such early stories within the context of their historical periods.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 232 Modern France

Alternately friends and rivals, modern France and the United States have had a complicated relationship ever since both nations were born in revolution at the end of the eighteenth century. This course will seek to understand France on its own terms by considering a series of formative events such as the Revolution of 1848, the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune, the Dreyfus Affair and the birth of the intellectual, the very different experiences of World Wars I and II, the post-colonial conflicts in Algeria and Vietnam, the near-revolution of May 1968, and contemporary arguments over French foreign and domestic policy.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 232W Modern France

Alternately friends and rivals, modern France and the United States have had a complicated relationship ever since both nations were born in revolution at the end of the eighteenth century. This course will seek to understand France on its own terms by considering a series of formative events such as the Revolution of 1848, the Franco-Prussian War and the Paris Commune, the Dreyfus Affair and the birth of the intellectual, the very different experiences of World Wars I and II, the post-colonial conflicts in Algeria and Vietnam, the near-revolution of May 1968, and contemporary arguments over French foreign and domestic policy.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 233 (Arezzo) Italy from Napolean to the First Republic

The Italian peninsula has a history that goes back at least 2500 years. But the state of Italy, founded in 1861, is younger than the United States. At the intersection of these two facts lies the main theme of our journey from the Napoleonic invasion of Italy to the approval of the constitution of the Republic of Italy: the difficulty faced by the political leaders of united Italy in getting its citizens to identify with the Italian state. Historical accounts and documents, integrated with a selection of literary, operatic, and cinematic materials, constitute the main sources of information and analysis.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 234 Knights, Criminals, and the Crown: Research in Medieval England

Enough record evidence survives from the operations of the medieval English government to allow students to reconstruct at least public life narratives of certain individuals. This course (1) provides the setting of medieval English history and (2) guides students in individual research projects based on printed and translated English royal documents. Choices include an Italian merchant-banker in London, an English bishop running the administration of Ireland, a rebellious knight at the time of Edward II, a great lady who acts virtually as an earl, and a combative Lincolnshire landowner.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 234W Knights, Criminals, and the Crown: Research in Medieval England

Enough record evidence survives from the operations of the medieval English government to allow students to reconstruct at least public life narratives of certain individuals. This course (1) provides the setting of medieval English history and (2) guides students in individual research projects based on printed and translated English royal documents. Choices include an Italian merchant-banker in London, an English bishop running the administration of Ireland, a rebellious knight at the time of Edward II, a great lady who acts virtually as an earl, and a combative Lincolnshire landowner.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 235 Earth, Wind, Water, Fire: An Environmental History of the Globe

This course is a global history of the world from the Columbian Exchange to the present. Using the four basic elements of earth, wind, water, and fire, we will explore the earth’s environmental history from the bottom-up. Along the way we will consider the following questions: Does the environment determine human history? Are humans separate from nature? Is environmental change a story of decline or ongoing transformation? Topics covered will include: industrial farming, salmon fishing, river reclamation, natural disasters, fossil fuels, wildfires, dust bowls, anthrax, suburban sprawl, national parks, nature tourism, and much more.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 235W Earth, Wind, Water, Fire: An Environmental History of the Globe

This course is a global history of the world from the Columbian Exchange to the present. Using the four basic elements of earth, wind, water, and fire, we will explore the earth’s environmental history from the bottom-up. Along the way we will consider the following questions: Does the environment determine human history? Are humans separate from nature? Is environmental change a story of decline or ongoing transformation? Topics covered will include: industrial farming, salmon fishing, river reclamation, natural disasters, fossil fuels, wildfires, dust bowls, anthrax, suburban sprawl, national parks, nature tourism, and much more.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 236 Digital History: Topics on China

Interested in learning about China and making maps at the same time? Turning your book knowledge into your own visual guide? Come join us in this class of “mapping history.” We will find out how China transformed itself from a socialist country to a capitalist giant. There are no prerequisites required. We will pick up digital tools like line drawings, Story Map (by ArcGIS), and Neatline (by Omeka) while traveling down China’s recent economic past.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 236W Digital History: Topics on China

Interested in learning about China and making maps at the same time? Turning your book knowledge into your own visual guide? Come join us in this class of “mapping history.” We will find out how China transformed itself from a socialist country to a capitalist giant. There are no prerequisites required. We will pick up digital tools like line drawings, Story Map (by ArcGIS), and Neatline (by Omeka) while traveling down China’s recent economic past.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 237 War and Society in Classical Antiquity

In this course we will study the interplay between warfare and the political, social, and economic structures of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. We will explore motivations for and ideologies of armed conflict, the impact of war on political and cultural development, the evolution of tactics and strategy, and the effects of hegemonic and imperial expansion on both the conquerors and the conquered. The course readings will incorporate foundational modern perspectives, but will emphasize ancient sources. All ancient sources will be read in English translation.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 239 Totalitarianism and Everyday Life

In this course we will compare everyday life in the Soviet Union under Stalin, Nazi Germany, and Fascist Italy. Topics we will discuss include the extent and location of popular support for these regimes, ordinary people's survival strategies, mass consumption, state efforts to manipulate family life and their success or failure, and gender roles. We will also analyze the concept of "totalitarianism" and discuss its value (or lack thereof) as a heuristic device.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 239W Totalitarianism and Everyday Life

In this course we will compare everyday life in the Soviet Union under Stalin, Nazi Germany, and Fascist Italy. Topics we will discuss include the extent and location of popular support for these regimes, ordinary people's survival strategies, mass consumption, state efforts to manipulate family life and their success or failure, and gender roles. We will also analyze the concept of "totalitarianism" and discuss its value (or lack thereof) as a heuristic device.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 240 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 240W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 241W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 242 The Culture of Zen

Zen Buddhism was the core around which many of Japan's greatest cultural achievements evolved. From the medieval period on, with its importation from China, the culture of Zen served as the primary context for much of Japanese metaphysics, architecture, landscape and interior design, medicine, ink painting, noh drama, haiku poetry, as well as the entire cultural complex known as the tea ceremony. Along with the Zen doctrinal and textual roots of these remarkable achievements, this course will examine the vibrant culture fostered in the medieval Zen monastic temple institution known as the Gozan and its dispersal into the culture at large.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 242W N/A

No description

HIS 243 Toward a Social Literature: The Coevolution of Literature and Society in Late Qing China

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 243W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 244W N/A

No description

HIS 245 Tibet: History from Myth

Tibet: the rooftop of the world. The land of Tibet has occupied a contested zone between history and myth for hundreds of years, from a proud Central Asian empire to a Buddhist hermit kingdom guarded by fighting monks, and from a mystical Land of Snows to a militarized ethnic region of China today. In this class we will study the history of Tibet and the roles of neighbors like China and India in shaping that history. We will also explore how Tibet has become a cultural phenomenon, from legends of Shangri-La to Dalai Lama CDs to films like “The Golden Child” and “Seven Years in Tibet.” Careful reading and discussion will be crucial in this class as we wade through myths, political controversies, and even good, bad, and terrabad Hollywood movies in search of the historical Tibet.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 245W Tibet: History from Myth

Tibet: the rooftop of the world. The land of Tibet has occupied a contested zone between history and myth for hundreds of years, from a proud Central Asian empire to a Buddhist hermit kingdom guarded by fighting monks, and from a mystical Land of Snows to a militarized ethnic region of China today. In this class we will study the history of Tibet and the roles of neighbors like China and India in shaping that history. We will also explore how Tibet has become a cultural phenomenon, from legends of Shangri-La to Dalai Lama CDs to films like “The Golden Child” and “Seven Years in Tibet.” Careful reading and discussion will be crucial in this class as we wade through myths, political controversies, and even good, bad, and terrabad Hollywood movies in search of the historical Tibet.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 246 Digital History: Topics on Global Capitalism

This course is focused on the history of capitalism from the 17th century to present. We will also make maps on top of learning history, and pick up digital tools like ArcGIS to translate our book knowledge into visual guide.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 246W Digital History: Topics on Global Capitalism

This course is focused on the history of capitalism from the 17th century to present. We will also make maps on top of learning history, and pick up digital tools like ArcGIS to translate our book knowledge into visual guide.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 247 The Korean War

The Korean War claimed over 3 million lives and led to the division of Korea, the isolation of China, and the rise of postwar Japan. In America, it helped push massive military buildup and McCarthyism. It was the first battlefield of the Cold War, the first jet war, and the first “limited war” whose battlefields---Chosin, Heartbreak Ridge, and Pork Chop Hill---taught Americans painful lessons that were all too quickly forgotten as the United States stumbled into Vietnam just over a decade later. This course covers modern Korean history, the role of Soviet and American intervention, China’s entry into the war, and the trauma of a Korean nation divided between North and South. Through history books, memoirs, and films, we will explore the lessons of the “Forgotten War” and the future of the Korean Peninsula.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 247W The Korean War

The Korean War claimed over 3 million lives and led to the division of Korea, the isolation of China, and the rise of postwar Japan. In America, it helped push massive military buildup and McCarthyism. It was the first battlefield of the Cold War, the first jet war, and the first “limited war” whose battlefields---Chosin, Heartbreak Ridge, and Pork Chop Hill---taught Americans painful lessons that were all too quickly forgotten as the United States stumbled into Vietnam just over a decade later. This course covers modern Korean history, the role of Soviet and American intervention, China’s entry into the war, and the trauma of a Korean nation divided between North and South. Through history books, memoirs, and films, we will explore the lessons of the “Forgotten War” and the future of the Korean Peninsula.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 248 The Samurai

SAMURAI: Swordsman---Servant---Warrior. Popular imagery portrays the samurai and their warrior code (Bushido) as the “soul” of Japan, and the samurai are as heavily romanticized as the knights of medieval Europe. But who were they, and were they really nobler than bloody killers? This course examines the origins of the warrior class in the 10th-11th centuries and its rise to power in the civil wars of medieval Japan. We will read books in Japanese history and literature to trace the peak and the end of the samurai age. We will also explore how the samurai have become a pop culture phenomenon, from the classic films of Akira Kurosawa to cult hits like “Rurouni Kenshin” and “Ghost Dog.” Careful reading and discussion will be crucial in this class to separate the real history from the popular myths.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 248W The Samurai

SAMURAI: Swordsman---Servant---Warrior. Popular imagery portrays the samurai and their warrior code (Bushido) as the “soul” of Japan, and the samurai are as heavily romanticized as the knights of medieval Europe. But who were they, and were they really nobler than bloody killers? This course examines the origins of the warrior class in the 10th-11th centuries and its rise to power in the civil wars of medieval Japan. We will read books in Japanese history and literature to trace the peak and the end of the samurai age. We will also explore how the samurai have become a pop culture phenomenon, from the classic films of Akira Kurosawa to cult hits like “Rurouni Kenshin” and “Ghost Dog.” Careful reading and discussion will be crucial in this class to separate the real history from the popular myths.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 249 Writing Volatility and Processing Change: A Survey of the Literatures of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 250 Economies and Societies in Latin America and the Caribbean since 1492

The main thrust of the course is an attempt to provide a historical explanation for the general problem of material poverty and the attendant socio-political crises that characterize contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. The course begins with an examination of the organization of the economies and societies in the region on the eve of the European conquest, and the factors determining the level of development attained by this time. This is followed by a discussion of the socio-economic processes during the colonial period. The post-colonial period (which differs from one country to another) is examined in the context of the inherited socio-economic structures of the colonial period and the changing conditions in the evolving modern global system.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 251 African Diaspora in Latin America

This upper-level seminar will analyze the arrival of over 6 million Africans to Latin America and their impact on the Portuguese and Spanish societies of the Western Hemisphere from 1500 to 1867. We will properly begin the study the African Diaspora in Latin America by studying the transition from Indigenous slavery to African slavery in Bahia, Brazil. The following weeks will cover the emergent demand for African laborers in the urban centers of Mexico, Colombia, Cuba and Peru. Throughout the class we will study the creative and creolizing cultural processes that accompanied the African presence in the region.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 251W African Diaspora in Latin America

This upper-level seminar will analyze the arrival of over 6 million Africans to Latin America and their impact on the Portuguese and Spanish societies of the Western Hemisphere from 1500 to 1867. We will properly begin the study the African Diaspora in Latin America by studying the transition from Indigenous slavery to African slavery in Bahia, Brazil. The following weeks will cover the emergent demand for African laborers in the urban centers of Mexico, Colombia, Cuba and Peru. Throughout the class we will study the creative and creolizing cultural processes that accompanied the African presence in the region.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 252 Immigration and the Americas

Although the United States received the largest number of immigrants in the western hemisphere in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the relative impact of immigrants was just as important in other countries such as Argentina and Brazil. This course explores the complex events, trends and personal decisions that impacted migrants' decisions. We will seek to understand their movements as a function of three essential questions: why do people migrate; who migrates; and how do they choose where they migrate? The course will incorporate a variety of materials including interviews, memoirs, monographs and demographic studies. Students will also be involved in a hands-on discovery of Rochester’s own immigrant communities.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 252W Immigration and the Americas

Although the United States received the largest number of immigrants in the western hemisphere in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the relative impact of immigrants was just as important in other countries such as Argentina and Brazil. This course explores the complex events, trends and personal decisions that impacted migrants' decisions. We will seek to understand their movements as a function of three essential questions: why do people migrate; who migrates; and how do they choose where they migrate? The course will incorporate a variety of materials including interviews, memoirs, monographs and demographic studies. Students will also be involved in a hands-on discovery of Rochester’s own immigrant communities.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 253 Digital Methods in Field Research

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 254 Big Business in the South: Business History of Brazil

Explore how big business emerged in modern Brazil and impacted the country’s development and classification as one of the world’s five major emerging economies. Using an economic historical lens, we will investigate how Brazilian growth and development conforms to or diverges from traditional economic history models. The course looks particularly at theories of development and how transportation, banking, and the film industry impacted Brazil’s 19th and 20th century history.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 254W Big Business in the South: Business History of Brazil

Explore how big business emerged in modern Brazil and impacted the country’s development and classification as one of the world’s five major emerging economies. Using an economic historical lens, we will investigate how Brazilian growth and development conforms to or diverges from traditional economic history models. The course looks particularly at theories of development and how transportation, banking, and the film industry impacted Brazil’s 19th and 20th century history.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 255 1492 and Beyond: Identity, Culture, and Society in Colonial Latin America

This course will examine the writings of Spanish American residents from 1492 through the end of the seventeenth century. By focusing on conquerors, nuns and indigenous intellectuals, we will analyze the uses of literature as history and viceversa within the context of colonial rule in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, Mexico, Peru and other spaces. A broad range of sources such as journal entries, poems, and chronicles (among others) will inform our understanding of colonial religion, society, identity, and politics. Readings will include: Christopher Columbus, Hernan Cortes, El Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana Inés del la Cruz, Chimalpahin and others. Course work will consist of several short papers, a research paper, student presentations, etc. Course in English. *Students taking the course for Spanish credit must have taken SP 200 and will do some reading and most of the writing in Spanish. .

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 255W 1492 and Beyond: Identity, Culture, and Society in Colonial Latin America

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 256 Politics of Nature: Gender, Race, and the Environment

This course explores the relationship between the environment and social inequality, focusing specifically on issues of gender, race, and class. Is there a connection between sexism, racism, class exploitation, and environmental destruction? This is the question we raise. Using intersectional feminist analysis, we will investigate the historical roots of modern dualist constructions that juxtapose humans and the environment, men and women, creating an anthropocentric, racialized, and engendered framework that produces and maintains both social inequalities and our destructive attitude towards the environment. Topics might include but are not limited to the following: historical ideas about nature and environment; eco-imperialism; eco-feminism; climate change and its connection to issues of race, gender, and class; justice and sustainability; poverty and natural resources; food justice; natural disasters (such as Hurricane Katrina) and their context, and others.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 256W Politics of Nature: Gender, Race, and the Environment

This course explores the relationship between the environment and social inequality, focusing specifically on issues of gender, race, and class. Is there a connection between sexism, racism, class exploitation, and environmental destruction? This is the question we raise. Using intersectional feminist analysis, we will investigate the historical roots of modern dualist constructions that juxtapose humans and the environment, men and women, creating an anthropocentric, racialized, and engendered framework that produces and maintains both social inequalities and our destructive attitude towards the environment. Topics might include but are not limited to the following: historical ideas about nature and environment; eco-imperialism; eco-feminism; climate change and its connection to issues of race, gender, and class; justice and sustainability; poverty and natural resources; food justice; natural disasters (such as Hurricane Katrina) and their context, and others.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 257 History of Masculinity

“Be a man” or “He acted like a real man” – we hear these and similar phrases around us all the time, but what does it mean “to be a real man”? How do we define what masculinity is? Does our definition of masculinity differ from, say, the medieval or Victorian? If so, then how and why? Using primary and secondary sources, as well as film and other media, this seminar explores the historical development of the modern concept of masculinity, the strategies that are used to learn to be “men” (such as sports), and how modern ideas about masculinity affect gender relationships in general as well as men’s mental and physical health.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 257W N/A

No description

HIS 258 Women's Lives and Letters: America 1830-1880

The description for HIS 258/W, 458, Women's Lives and Letters: Using manuscript correspondence of women from upstate New York in the mid-19th century, students will explore the historical themes contained in the letters--literature and reading, the creation of epistolary selves, readership and authorship, friendship, marriage, motherhood, illness and death, child-rearing, education, spirituality and religion, medical practice, and reform, including abolitionism and women's rights, among other public and domestic themes. Reading in secondary sources will historicize the letters' content; research projects will draw on other primary sources in UR's collections. Students will each transcribe and annotate about ten letters, identifying people and places named in them, and learn text encoding in order to tag the letters for the Seward Family Archive website.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 258W Women's Lives and Letters: America 1830-1880

The description for HIS 258/W, 458, Women's Lives and Letters: Using manuscript correspondence of women from upstate New York in the mid-19th century, students will explore the historical themes contained in the letters--literature and reading, the creation of epistolary selves, readership and authorship, friendship, marriage, motherhood, illness and death, child-rearing, education, spirituality and religion, medical practice, and reform, including abolitionism and women's rights, among other public and domestic themes. Reading in secondary sources will historicize the letters' content; research projects will draw on other primary sources in UR's collections. Students will each transcribe and annotate about ten letters, identifying people and places named in them, and learn text encoding in order to tag the letters for the Seward Family Archive website.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 259 History of Feminism: Colloquium

In this colloquium we will look at the history of international feminism and explore its many faces. We will examine the various factors that have contributed to women’s historically lower status in society; will look at the emergence of women’s rights and feminist movements as well as the distinctions among various feminist theories, and will discuss the relevance of feminism today.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 259W History of Feminism: Colloquium

In this colloquium we will look at the history of international feminism and explore its many faces. We will examine the various factors that have contributed to women’s historically lower status in society; will look at the emergence of women’s rights and feminist movements as well as the distinctions among various feminist theories, and will discuss the relevance of feminism today.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 260 Research Colloquium: Lewis Henry Morgan's Biecentennial

This colloquium will focus on the life, works and contested legacies of Lewis Henry Morgan (1818-1881), a Rochester attorney and founding figure of American anthropology. Students will conduct original research using archival materials and museum collections on campus and at local cultural institutions. This research will provide content for exhibitions, events, and a website to be planned in connection with the bicentennial of Morgan’s birth.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 261 American Journeys, American Lives

This course uses the close reading of primary documents—memoirs, autobiographies, fiction, sermons, journalism—to explore how Americans have crossed physical space, confronted racial and gender divides, embarked on spiritual discovery, and made other kinds of transformative journeys between the colonial era and the twenty-first century. It will consider such figures as John Winthrop, Mary Rowlandson, Langston Hughes, and Barack Obama. Its larger goal is to figure out some of the values, aspirations, and anxieties that have marked American culture from the beginning to the present.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 261W American Journeys, American Lives

This course uses the close reading of primary documents—memoirs, autobiographies, fiction, sermons, journalism—to explore how Americans have crossed physical space, confronted racial and gender divides, embarked on spiritual discovery, and made other kinds of transformative journeys between the colonial era and the twenty-first century. It will consider such figures as John Winthrop, Mary Rowlandson, Langston Hughes, and Barack Obama. Its larger goal is to figure out some of the values, aspirations, and anxieties that have marked American culture from the beginning to the present.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 262 American Culture since 1876

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2010

HIS 263 History of Food

This seminar examines the shifting relationship between people, food, and the environment that ties them together. It asks how have distance and space between the sites of production and consumption affected the economic and social relations of food? How has geography influenced the types of food people eat? How do views of scarcity and plenty shape approaches to farming? What is the role of governments and markets in agriculture? How does food refract and transform social divisions, cultural attitudes, and daily life? Topics include rural development; subsistence gardening; famine; histories of sugar, corn, pork, fish, whales, ice cream, and anything else that fits on a dinner plate.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 263W History of Food

This seminar examines the shifting relationship between people, food, and the environment that ties them together. It asks how have distance and space between the sites of production and consumption affected the economic and social relations of food? How has geography influenced the types of food people eat? How do views of scarcity and plenty shape approaches to farming? What is the role of governments and markets in agriculture? How does food refract and transform social divisions, cultural attitudes, and daily life? Topics include rural development; subsistence gardening; famine; histories of sugar, corn, pork, fish, whales, ice cream, and anything else that fits on a dinner plate.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 264 The Idea of America

WHAT IS AMERICA? A country? A continent? A political ideal? A culture? This course traces the development of ideas about America, from its historical beginnings to our own time, from European fantasies about the New World and its possibilities to the experiences of settlers and citizens facing its realities. We will explore the competing and even contending narratives of America in a wide variety of cultural documents, from orations, sermons and political tracts to novels, poems, photographs, and films. The course is open to all interested students and required for all American Studies majors.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 264W THE IDEA OF AMERICA

No description

HIS 265 Women and Work in the Americas

This course will examine the economic activities of women in traditional societies that preceded and laid the foundations for early industrialization.  In a variety of pre-industrial societies from Europe, Africa, and the Americas, we will examine closely the participation of women as they contributed to their community’s economic and social wellbeing. The course will investigate the claim that women’s economic contribution was a primary determinant of the nature and pace of the shift from “household work” to “market places,” and ultimately to a “market economy.”

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 265W N/A

This course will examine the economic activities of women in traditional societies that preceded and laid the foundations for early industrialization. In a variety of pre-industrial societies from Europe, Africa, and the Americas, we will examine closely the participation of women as they contributed to their community’s economic and social wellbeing. The course will investigate the claim that women’s economic contribution was a primary determinant of the nature and pace of the shift from “household work” to “market places,” and ultimately to a “market economy.”

HIS 266 The Arts in American Culture

Examines selected topics in American art and culture of the 19th and 20th centuries. A central concern will be the way in which images, especially paintings and photographs, gave shape to the ideas of what America was and what it meant to be American, as well as to the creation of an urban culture.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 267 History of White Supremacy

The central theme of American history is the problem of race. At the heart of the race problem in America is the white supremacy ideology. Pre-modern concepts of human distinctions typically rested on group membership and coalesced around notable differences such as ethnicity, religion, and color, but without anything resembling a formal ideology. In the United States, the historically constructed ideology of White Supremacy provided an intellectual foundation that supported a system of white wealth, power, and privilege. This course will examine the competing forces that produced a white supremacy ideology that was unique to the United States: conceived in the seventeenth century during the years of early settlement, it was born in the political turmoil of the Civil War and Reconstruction era, and reached adulthood in the Civil Rights struggles of the twentieth century.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 267W History of White Supremacy

The central theme of American history is the problem of race. At the heart of the race problem in America is the white supremacy ideology. Pre-modern concepts of human distinctions typically rested on group membership and coalesced around notable differences such as ethnicity, religion, and color, but without anything resembling a formal ideology. In the United States, the historically constructed ideology of White Supremacy provided an intellectual foundation that supported a system of white wealth, power, and privilege. This course will examine the competing forces that produced a white supremacy ideology that was unique to the United States: conceived in the seventeenth century during the years of early settlement, it was born in the political turmoil of the Civil War and Reconstruction era, and reached adulthood in the Civil Rights struggles of the twentieth century.

HIS 268 History of the American South, 1896-1946

Blue States! Red States! Why so many “red states” in the south? Why such a close attachment to family, religion, community? Why such a penchant for a distinct music, food, and sports culture? Why has the region been so long associated with social backwardness—violence, racism, and political conservatism? These and other characteristics (real or imagined) have roots that extend back to Europe and Africa while many are the result of more recent events—dating back only a few generations. This course will address these and other questions in the search of historical answer to the roots of southern peculiarities and the origins of those “Red States.”

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 268W History of the American South, 1896-1946

Blue States! Red States! Why so many “red states” in the south? Why such a close attachment to family, religion, community? Why such a penchant for a distinct music, food, and sports culture? Why has the region been so long associated with social backwardness—violence, racism, and political conservatism? These and other characteristics (real or imagined) have roots that extend back to Europe and Africa while many are the result of more recent events—dating back only a few generations. This course will address these and other questions in the search of historical answer to the roots of southern peculiarities and the origins of those “Red States.”

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 269 The Civil War

Over 150 years after the Civil War, historians continue to disagree as to "what caused the war" and raise doubts as to exactly who were the "winners" and "losers." The course re-examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of the American Civil War.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 269W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 270 Progressive America

This course will examine the social, political, and cultural aspects of American Progressivism during the years 1890-1920. Among the topics of focus will be the movement's origins, its dominant strains of thought, its triumphs, and ultimate failure. In addition to providing a factual background of the movement and period, this course will assist students in developing and sharpening their reading, writing, and analytical skills.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 272 Spiritualism in America

The primary aim of this course is to explore the historical development and structural make-up of modern American Spiritualism. This course offers students a historical narrative that ranges from the early development of modern Spiritualism in upstate New York to current forms, such as African American Spiritual churches of New Orleans. In addition to this historical survey, the course examines major principles making up the framework of modern Spiritualism in America. Class format includes lectures, discussions, films, and field trips.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 273 Lincoln, Douglass, and American Freedom

In what was probably the world's greatest century, marked by several national and international struggles for human freedom, two men stand head and shoulders above the many great men and women who participated in a civil war for American freedom: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. At first glance, these two men had little in common; one born free on the American frontier, the other unfree in the heartland of slavery. Yet they had much in common; both largely self-educated, they both attained a mastery for words and the ability to communicate simply and directly with their fellow man. As if born to fight in one major battle for human freedom, these two men traveled diverse roads to meet on a momentous battlefield: black freedom and the future of America. Utilizing a wide range of sometimes opposing tactics, each in his own way shaped 19th century Americans understanding of what it meant to be free and a citizen.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 273W Lincoln, Douglass, and American Freedom

In what was probably the world's greatest century, marked by several national and international struggles for human freedom, two men stand head and shoulders above the many great men and women who participated in a civil war for American freedom: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. At first glance, these two men had little in common; one born free on the American frontier, the other unfree in the heartland of slavery. Yet they had much in common; both largely self-educated, they both attained a mastery for words and the ability to communicate simply and directly with their fellow man. As if born to fight in one major battle for human freedom, these two men traveled diverse roads to meet on a momentous battlefield: black freedom and the future of America. Utilizing a wide range of sometimes opposing tactics, each in his own way shaped 19th century Americans understanding of what it meant to be free and a citizen.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 274 History of Race in America

We will identify and discuss the salient moments in the nation's history when race functioned as an organizing principle in the construction of American public and private institutions. Course readings will examine the historical background of current debates on issues such as Affirmative Action, Diversity, Multiculturalism, Educational Testing, Reparations, the Media, and Political Party Re-alignment.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 274W History of Race in America

We will identify and discuss the salient moments in the nation's history when race functioned as an organizing principle in the construction of American public and private institutions. Course readings will examine the historical background of current debates on issues such as Affirmative Action, Diversity, Multiculturalism, Educational Testing, Reparations, the Media, and Political Party Re-alignment.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 275 Economics of Discrimination

Economic development of African Americans during the twentieth century, with an examination of the economics of discrimination. Same as HIS 275 and AAS 253.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 275W Economics of Discrimination

Economic development of African Americans during the twentieth century, with an examination of the economics of discrimination. Same as HIS 253 and AAS 253.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 276 Sports in U.S. History

Recent acts of protest by high school, collegiate, and professional athletes—from kneeling during the national anthem to refusing invitations to the White House—remind us that sports are not and have never been separate from the world of politics, nor are they isolated from social, cultural, and economic contexts. Rather, sports reflect the society in which they are embedded and at times have spurred change in these realms. This course will explore U.S. history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through the lens of sports. Among the many questions we will consider are: How might one define a “sport,” and how have popular understandings of “sport” changed over time? What functions have sports served in American life? How have sports reinforced inequities in American society, such as those among racial, socioeconomic, and/or gendered lines? To what degree have sports defied these boundaries, acting as agents of democratization? Above all, we will ask: What does it mean to study sports historically?

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 276W Sports in U.S. History

Recent acts of protest by high school, collegiate, and professional athletes—from kneeling during the national anthem to refusing invitations to the White House—remind us that sports are not and have never been separate from the world of politics, nor are they isolated from social, cultural, and economic contexts. Rather, sports reflect the society in which they are embedded and at times have spurred change in these realms. This course will explore U.S. history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries through the lens of sports. Among the many questions we will consider are: How might one define a “sport,” and how have popular understandings of “sport” changed over time? What functions have sports served in American life? How have sports reinforced inequities in American society, such as those among racial, socioeconomic, and/or gendered lines? To what degree have sports defied these boundaries, acting as agents of democratization? Above all, we will ask: What does it mean to study sports historically?

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 277 American Movies in their Moment: The Golden Age, 1929-1945

This course considers feature films as evidence for the cultural historian of modern America by considering the role of movies in the social imaginary of the Great Depression and World War II. Films include Little Caesar, Gold Diggers of 1933, Gone with the Wind, Citizen Kane, Double Indemnity, Best Years of Our Lives.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 278 The Seward Family's Civil War

A hands-on introduction to web-design and historical editing using the Papers of William Henry Seward (1801-1872), Governor of New York, US Senator, and Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. The Rush Rhees Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation Department holds the collection, which contains Seward’s public and private correspondence, and that of family members, including his wife, five children, and their extended family. The course will include background reading on the Civil War era, technical instruction on web design in a computer lab, transcribing, editing, annotating historical manuscripts using the original documents, and participation in construction of a website for a digital edition of the papers. This course is a prerequisite for HIS 320: Seward Family in Peace and War, and internships working on the Seward Family digital editorial project.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 278W The Seward Family's Civil War

A hands-on introduction to web-design and historical editing using the Papers of William Henry Seward (1801-1872), Governor of New York, US Senator, and Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. The Rush Rhees Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation Department holds the collection, which contains Seward’s public and private correspondence, and that of family members, including his wife, five children, and their extended family. The course will include background reading on the Civil War era, technical instruction on web design in a computer lab, transcribing, editing, annotating historical manuscripts using the original documents, and participation in construction of a website for a digital edition of the papers. This course is a prerequisite for HIS 320: Seward Family in Peace and War, and internships working on the Seward Family digital editorial project.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 279 The Seward Family in Peace and War

A history class in the digital studies curriculum that assumes no background in either one. It is a hands-on introduction to the history of the family, gender, and the antebellum and Civil War eras, to historical editing, and to website design and creation, using the Papers of William Henry Seward (1801-1872), Governor of New York, US Senator, and Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. This semester, we will focus on the family’s correspondence from the 1830s, when Seward was away in Albany much of the time, first as a state senator and then as the governor of New York. Topics include the cholera epidemic of 1832, romantic love, and household economy.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 279W The Seward Family in Peace and War

A history class in the digital studies curriculum that assumes no background in either one. It is a hands-on introduction to the history of the family, gender, and the antebellum and Civil War eras, to historical editing, and to website design and creation, using the Papers of William Henry Seward (1801-1872), Governor of New York, US Senator, and Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. This semester, we will focus on the family’s correspondence from the 1830s, when Seward was away in Albany much of the time, first as a state senator and then as the governor of New York. Topics include the cholera epidemic of 1832, romantic love, and household economy.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 280 Archaeology of Early America

This course introduces students to historical archaeology and uses archaeological sites, material culture, and architecture to investigate European colonization of the Americas. Topics include Euro-Indian contact, the transfer of European and African cultures to American shores, creolization and the emergence of distinctly American traditions, Atlantic connections, and how non-documentary sources help us understand the lives of African-Americans, Indians, and white settlers.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 280W Archaeology of Early America

This course introduces students to historical archaeology and uses archaeological sites, material culture, and architecture to investigate European colonization of the Americas. Topics include Euro-Indian contact, the transfer of European and African cultures to American shores, creolization and the emergence of distinctly American traditions, Atlantic connections, and how non-documentary sources help us understand the lives of African-Americans, Indians, and white settlers.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 281 The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective

The debate on the role of the state versus that of the free market in the socioeconomic process is as old as the history of political economy. We discuss wheconomics of state policy and the long-run historical processes that created the political & economic conditions. Students’ performance is based on three short essays (four typed pages each) presented to the class for discussion and thereafter revised for grading. No mid-term & final examinations.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 281W The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective

The debate on the role of the state versus that of the free market in the socioeconomic process is as old as the history of political economy. We discuss wheconomics of state policy and the long-run historical processes that created the political & economic conditions. Students’ performance is based on three short essays (four typed pages each) presented to the class for discussion and thereafter revised for grading. No mid-term & final examinations.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 282W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 283 Economy and Society in Classical Antiquity

In this course we will explore the nature and development of Greek and Roman economies, the ways in which these economies intersected with social and political structures, and the strategies of the men and women who lived in them. We will devote considerable attention to issues of methodology: what questions should we ask about ancient economic life, and with what evidence can we answer them? All sources will be read in English translation.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 284 Body and Sexuality

This course explores a number of thematic topics in the history and politics of sex, sexuality, and the body. It looks at human bodies as cultural sites that have been constructed, experienced, and regulated in different ways at different times. In this continuous process of redefining and reimagining bodies, sex and sexualities emerge as important strategies that shape, control, and liberate bodies, both cultural and physical, individual and political. The course examines changing sexual behaviors and identities and considers the politics of sex as it moves out of private bedrooms into the realm of political ideologies, discourses, and practices.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 284W Body and Sexuality

This course explores a number of thematic topics in the history and politics of sex, sexuality, and the body. It looks at human bodies as cultural sites that have been constructed, experienced, and regulated in different ways at different times. In this continuous process of redefining and reimagining bodies, sex and sexualities emerge as important strategies that shape, control, and liberate bodies, both cultural and physical, individual and political. The course examines changing sexual behaviors and identities and considers the politics of sex as it moves out of private bedrooms into the realm of political ideologies, discourses, and practices.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 285 Digital History: Building a Virtual St. George's

Students will conduct guided research using a variety of software and historical sources to help create a Virtual Digital St. George’s – a 400-year-old town with approximately 250 properties and historic buildings. We will build multi-layer 2D and selective 3D computer models of the oldest town in English America (founded 1612). Work will include integrating different types of historical data into Excel or ArcGIS databases, independent research on specific buildings and property owners using digital newspaper archives, "building" individual 3D houses within the town using Sketch-Up, Maya, or Revit, reconstructing and furnishing historic house interiors using interior design software. Students with computer programming experience may develop mini-games or mobile devise apps to educate modern visitors to the town.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 285W Digital History: Building a Virtual St. George's

Students will conduct guided research using a variety of software and historical sources to help create a Virtual Digital St. George’s – a 400-year-old town with approximately 250 properties and historic buildings. We will build multi-layer 2D and selective 3D computer models of the oldest town in English America (founded 1612). Work will include integrating different types of historical data into Excel or ArcGIS databases, independent research on specific buildings and property owners using digital newspaper archives, "building" individual 3D houses within the town using Sketch-Up, Maya, or Revit, reconstructing and furnishing historic house interiors using interior design software. Students with computer programming experience may develop mini-games or mobile devise apps to educate modern visitors to the town.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 286 Modern Italy through Film

Taking the inspiration from Martin Scorsese’s anthological film My Voyage to Italy, the course focuses on a few momentous episodes and phenomena of Italian political, social, and cultural history as portrayed and interpreted in film. We will discuss aspects of Risorgimento, Fascism, the World Wars and their aftermath, the culture of individual cities, the contrast between North and South, the condition of women, emigration and immigration, power and repression, spirituality, and secularism. Among the major film directors, we will include Rossellini, Visconti, Fellini, Olmi, and Bertolucci. The analysis of the movies will be integrated with readings from the fields of history, literature, criticism, and theater. A glance at Verdi’s operas in the Nineteenth Century and at the tradition of social song as it develops in the post war period will complement the course. This course is complementary to HIS 228 offered in Arezzo.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 286W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 287 Music in New Worlds

After 1492, Europeans and other peoples around the globe began to discover each other in new ways, and music played a vital role in their encounters. This course equips students to develop a global perspective on music in the early modern era. Through case studies in Latin America, New England, China, and Africa, students will gain insight into the ways people use music as an agent of political and religious power in processes of cultural exchange and conflict. The course examines how missionaries and colonial leaders mixed musical cultures to build new social structures; and how colonial subjects responded creatively, in collaboration or resistance, to shape hybrid identities. We will study musical practices from both sides of the encounters, including Chinese and Native American musics and exported European practices like religious choral music and popular dances. Meets in the Robbins Library or hands-on engagement with rare books and manuscripts. No prior musical knowledge is required.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 287W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 288 POLITICS AND CULTURE IN FASCIST ITALY

Interviewed by the Chicago Daily News in 1924, Mussolini said that Fascism was “the greatest experiment in history in making Italians.” Within the historical and political framework of the so-called Ventennio Fascista—from 1922 to 1943—the course examines Mussolini’s cultural politics as a fundamental strategy not only to gain popular consent and propagate the ideology of the regime, but to implement his vision of Italian national identity. Relying on both material culture, and historical documents and analyses, we will study the fascist philosophy and politics of education, the myth of Rome and its imperial legacy, the archeological, architectural, and restoration projects, the graphic arts, fashion, sports, and documentary film.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 288W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 289 Visionaries, Mystics, and Saints in Medieval and Renaissance Europe

What marked out some people as “friends of God” in medieval and Renaissance Europe? And how could contemporaries and modern authors write about interior religious states? The notion of sainthood and the status of mystical visionaries could, in fact, be topics of major dispute, as the example of Joan of Arc demonstrates. This course examines the linked phenomena of mysticism, visions, and sanctity through an introduction to major scholarship on the field, as well as to important contemporary sources for the study of saints and mystics.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 289W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 290 Ancient Christianity

The rise of early Christianity from a persecuted minority religious movement to the dominant religion of the Roman Empire.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 291 Slavery in Classical Antiquity

In this course we will explore Greek and Roman slavery by discussing a series of specific problems: the historical origins of slavery in Ancient Greece and Rome; the ideologies constructed by slaveholders to justify enslavement and control their slaves; the nature of master-slave relationships and the ways in which factors like a slave’s gender and education affected the social and economic realities of these relationships; and the extent to which slaves could realistically hope for manumission. We will also devote considerable time to a basic problem of method: given that much of our evidence reflects of the views of the slaveholding elite, is it possible to reconstruct the experiences of slaves themselves? All sources will be read in English translation.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 292 The History of the Christian Church: From the Reformation to the Present

This course will focus on the relationship between Christianity and its social environments from the late Middle Ages to the modern world with special focus on the Reformation, enlightenment and present moment.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 293 The Bible in English

This course considers the poetics and politics of the English Bible, centering on the seventeenth century: the century of the King James translation, the Thirty Years War, the English Revolution, and the rise of many radical religious groups. Among other topics, we will consider what made Bible translation so politically dangerous (and effective) during this time. We will ask when and why a book counts as “scripture.” We will track the importance of Bible translation for revolutionaries and visionaries like the Levellers, the Quakers, and the Ranters, who scandalized early modern society with new ideas of religious liberty, gender equality, and non-hierarchical spirituality. Finally, we will consider the role of the Bible in current-day conflicts and identities. In addition to excerpts from the Bible, students will read the Sidneys, Milton, Herbert, Donne, Abiezer Coppe, Spinoza, Hutchison, Bunyan, and Swift.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 293W N/A

No description

HIS 294 Marx, Nietzsche & Freud

This course examines the views of the Marx, Nietzsche, and Freud on religion. Each of these three thinkers developed a radical critique of the religion that was a vital part of his thought, and echoes of their views continue to be heard in contemporary debates about religion. We will discuss their explanations of the origins of religious ideas, the validity of their criticisms – most prominently that religion as such is now harmful to humanity – and how each man’s view of religion reflects larger concerns in his thought. Key Concepts of each thinker, such as alienation (Marx), nihilism (Nietzsche), and neurosis (Freud), will be analyzed.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 295 Venice and the Jews

This Course will Explore the Jewish experience in Renaissance and early modern Italy with a special focus on Venice. Topics will include the institution of the ghettos, Jewish merchants and moneylenders, Jewish everyday life, the inquisition and the Marranos, and Jewish literature and the arts.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 296 Ancient Greek and Roman Historiography

This course examines the craft of ancient Greek historiography by looking at the method, style, and purpose of the ancient Greek historians. We will read selections from the major historians, including Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, Arrian, Appian, and Cassius Dio, as well discuss the more fragmentary and minor historians in the Greek historiographical tradition. Among the principal questions to be discussed in this course: What are the social and historical roots of the historiographical habit as practiced by the Greeks? How does ancient Greek history writing differ from the modern practice of history? How does the practice of writing history change in relation to the different social and historical.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 296W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2011

HIS 297 Intellectual History of Istanbul

This course traces the dominant representations of Istanbul in historical and literary texts, visual art, architecture, and cinema. As an ancient and modern historical site of intersections of cultures, Istanbul is an apt setting to explore tensions of identity, influence, modernity, East-West & Europe-Middle East relations, globalization, cosmopolitanism, Islam, and “Turkishness.” Through textual and visual analyses, we will examine the major cultural forces that define Istanbul’s urban spaces: mahalle, harem, historical old city, the street, the Bosphorus, gecekondu, pazar, and the new urban spaces. We will frame our analyses of primary texts with supplemental material on nationalism, orientalism, gender, representation, globalization, visual studies, cultural translation, and modern critical theory. By the end you will have mastered key tools to make important interventions in debates concerning urban politics and city culture that continue to define debates in Turkey, Europe, and the Middle East.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 298 "Witchcraft" and "The Occult" in Modern African History

This course introduces students to a range of beliefs and practices in Africa frequently referred to as “Witchcraft” or “The Occult.” We will approach these phenomena not as cultural exotica, but rather as quintessentially modern forms of theory and practice. Through a series of case studies from across the continent in the colonial and postcolonial eras, the course poses a number related questions: Is witchcraft rational? Is it a matter of belief? How is “the occult” related to other aspects of politics, economy, and society? How do we explain observable patterns in who gets accused of witchcraft? What are the responsibilities of Government to accused witches and their alleged victims? Is practicing witchcraft a crime?

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 299 Archaeology Field and Research Methods

Using Smiths Island, Bermuda, as a historical laboratory, this course trains students in archival research and archaeological survey, excavation, and lab analysis techniques and prepares them for professional work as historical archaeologists. Students will also learn about Bermudian and Atlantic historical developments, trade relations, and slavery and the African diaspora since 1610. Participants will also be introduced to archaeological conservation, museum studies, and underwater archaeological techniques. No prior archaeology experience is necessary.

Last Offered: Summer 2018

HIS 299A N/A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2013

HIS 300W The History of Nature

This course explores the history of the idea and condition of nature from ancient times to the present. Drawing on contemporary historical scholarship as well as a range of thinkers and writers from Petrarch to Thoreau and beyond, we will study the many ways in which humans have thought about and treated the natural world around them and how the natural world has shaped human history in turn. Some background in history is recommended.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 301W Modernity and Modernism: Topics Course

A study of selected topics in the history of modern thought and culture in Europe and the United States.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 303W International Human Rights

What does it mean to be human? What political, economic, religious, social, or sexual rights might be part of different people's working definitions? This course will look at both a) the historical development of conflicting theories of human rights and b) more contemporary debates about their ideal extent, their exercise, and their enforcement. Special topics will include debates over the meaning of the American and French Revolutions, the fight to design an International Declaration of Human Rights in the aftermath of World War II, the history of organizations such as Amnesty International, and the controversy around UN events such as the 1995 World Conference on Women in Beijing, the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, and the 2000 and 2005 Millennium Summits in New York City.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 304W Readings in Atlantic History

This course surveys recent scholarship on the early modern Atlantic world emphasizing comparative, transnational and connective methodologies. Topics will include imperial rivalries, the emergence of creole cultures, trade and smuggling, oceanic and coastal environments, the circulations of commodities, diseases, print, and ideas, slavery and the slave trade, community studies of Atlantic places, and the promise and limits of an Atlantic perspective. Students will produce an original research paper on an Atlantic topic.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 305W Maritime Atlantic World

Study of European expansion into Africa and the Americas from the ages of Discovery to Revolution has taken many forms. Some pursued their investigations topically (slavery, migration, economic development, etc.) and others focused on particular colonies or regions. We shift the focus of inquiry to the Atlantic Ocean itself, as the geographic center of an expanding European world. Rather than treat the ocean as peripheral while studying the settlement of the Atlantic coast, we will be primarily concerned with activities that took place upon its watery face, delving into the lives of the tens of thousands of mariners who were catalysts in identity formation, migration, and economic development. Our focus will be on three topics: migration, (forced and free), maritime activities (seafaring, shipping, and fishing), and trade (how merchants did business and integrated regional economies). By the end, you will hopefully appreciate the centrality of the sea to the development of Africa, Europe, and the Americas.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 306W Evolution of the Current World Economic Order from 1500

No description

HIS 307 N/A

No description

HIS 307W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2010

HIS 309W The Mediterranean World, 1400-1800

As the meeting point between three continents—Africa, Asia, and Europe—the Mediterranean Sea has been a forum for conflict and acculturation for millennia. In the first part of this course, we will examine the work of historians who have understood the Mediterranean as a region both set apart and unified by its geography and networks of exchange. We will then test these ideas by taking a close look at issues of interconnectedness, boundary-crossing, and relations between Christians, Muslims, and Jews in the Mediterranean world during the late medieval and early modern period.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 310W The Political Economy of Food in Africa

A three-part exploration of the idea that in the world of African peasants food does not have an independent life apart from the social relations of those who eat it. Part I traces the social biography of food as it moves from the field to the table; Part II seeks to understand whether and to what extent the daily and seasonal processes of Part I acquired new meanings and long-term historical trajectories as a result of Africas engagement with the global economy, and Parts III recasts the issues raised in Parts I and II into a debate between peasant intellectuals and professional historians.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 311W The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africa, 1650-1851

By the middle of the 19th c. a highly integrated economic system, called the Atlantic Economic Order, had emerged, linking together through a web of multilateral trade the economies of the Atlantic basin that remained unconnected in the late 15th c. The economies of Africa occupied the lowest position within this Economic Order. We examine the extent to which the Transatlantic Slave Trade could help explain this weak position. Beginning with a general view of the level of socioeconomic development in Africa by the late 15th c., relative to other regions in the Atlantic basin, we will proceed to examine the impact of the Atlantic slave trade on the competitive development of commodity production in Africa for the evolving Atlantic market of the period, as well as the socioeconomic and political consequences of the export slave trade within Africa. One major theme of the course is the extent to which the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade limited the development of capitalism in Africa during the period in question.

HIS 312W Global Crime and Detection

This course will examine on how detective and police fiction reveals the political and cultural tensions and conflicts of a society. Our focus will be global and comparative, concentrating on post-World War II (1945 - ) life. Among the issues at the heart of the exploration are explore the limitations of social democracy and neutrality in Scandinavia, which has of late excelled in the genre, the domination of landholding families in Sicily, the corporate domination of Barcelona, the oppressiveness of apartheid in Natal, South Africa, the undemocratic rule of the ruling PRI in Mexico, the ideological blindness and bureaucratic inefficiency of Communism in China and the strange combination of capitalism and feudal structure in Japan. Supplementing each story of crime and detection will be short historical readings.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 313W N/A

No description

HIS 314W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 315W N/A

No description

HIS 316W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 317 N/A

No description

HIS 317W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 318W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 319 N/A

No description

HIS 319W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 320W Topics in Medieval European History

Selected problems in the political, social, and intellectual history of the Middle Ages.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 321W Topics in Early Modern European History

Although most people in early modern Europe lived in rural settings, cities assumed new importance during this period. We will examine these cities as capitols for newly centralized empires and as engines of commerce while also considering how urban communities responded to challenges such as poverty, crime, demographic change, and social unrest. Through case studies including Venice, Amsterdam, London, Seville, and Constantinople, we will also explore how cities brought together elite values and the ‘culture of the street’ and thus played a key role in transitions from medieval to modern society.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 323W World War II: Eastern Front

This course is centered on class discussion of the readings. There will be little lecture time. We will focus on the history of the Soviet Union's struggle with Nazi Germany from 1941-1945, the largest and bloodiest military conflict in human history. Readings will deal with the Holocaust, the history of military operations, the Red Army's "learning curve" in its battle with the Wehrmacht, and everyday life on Nazi-occupied territory as well as the Soviet "home front." Viewing and discussion of documentary and fictional films will be a significant part of the class.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 325 N/A

No description

HIS 325W Microhistory

Microhistorians focus on the everyday experiences of ordinary people and uses these to illuminate larger issues. In doing so, microhistory has challenged traditional notions of what matters within history: by choosing “little” people and events instead of seemingly more important political events and actors, by emphasizing marginalized groups usually left out of depictions of normative human experience, and by showing the limits within which individuals have been able to make meaningful choices in their lives. In this course, we’ll read several examples of microhistory, as well as critiques of the method, in order to explore some basic questions of historical study. Can we ever truly represent past lives? Where’s the boundary between history and fiction? What’s the relationship between past and present? Which is more convincing (or truthful): qualitative or quantitative evidence? Since our emphasis will be on the method itself, students will be free to choose research topics from any time period or region.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 326W HISTORY OF ADVENTURE

Why do people climb high mountains, traverse torrid desserts, and sail icy polar seas at mortal peril to themselves and often to no particular purpose? With an emphasis on mountaineering and the exploration of extreme environments, this seminar traces the history of the persistent human tendency to engage in that dangerous and exciting form of activity that we call adventure. Readings will largely consist of classic accounts and memoirs, ranging from Christopher Columbus's journals to Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air." Course requirements to include consistent participation in seminar discussions and a final research project.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 327W REAL EXISTING SOCIALISM

This course examines the diverse history of socialist ideology as lived-experience across Europe. It beings with the first theorists of socialism and places their ideas in the context of a rapidly industrializing Europe in Germany, France, and Great Britain. From the Paris Commune to the Iron Curtain, the course explores the surprising varieties of socialist socieites that emerged in the 19th and 20th centuries. This course asks students to consider: how were these societies ruled and why did they fail? To what extent were they influenced by the political philosophies of the 19th century? To what extent were they a product of geo-political conflicts and the failures of capitalism in the 20th? How did socialist leaders and citizens imagine the future of socialist development? What was the every-day lived experience of secret police and state force, but also of food, fashion, music, literature, and film?

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 328W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 330 N/A

No description

HIS 330W British Imperialism

This seminar is an upper-level introduction to the history of British imperialism and colonialism from the 17th century to the present. Drawing on a variety of primary and secondary materials, we will explore such subjects as geographical exploration (from the South Seas to the Himalaya), colonial settlement and trade, the effects of empire on nature and environment, imperial psychology, imperial culture, gender and empire, decolonization, and the legacy of the British empire in Africa, Asia, and elsewhere. Readings will include classic works by Hobson and Lenin as well as novels, colonial memoirs, and histories. Our format will consist of a mix of informal lectures and discussions and the occasional documentary film. Short response papers and a final research paper (or alternative project) are required.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 331W Europe in 1215

Three events taking place in 1215 provide windows for close looks into the Medieval world of Western Europe. (1) The movement for a measure of control over the rapidly expanding royal power in England produced the Magna Carta. (2) The Fourth Lateran Council legislated important elements for the centralizing and papal-directed church and stimulated the creation of a theology to reach the laity more fully. (3) Poets began writing the vast prose cycle of Arthurian, chivalric romances that we know as the Vulgate or Lancelot-Grail cycle. In short, the course considers politics, law and constitutionalism in the growth of medieval monarchy, the centralizing clerical church and its relationship with the laity, and the world of Arthurian romance. We will take up each subject in turn before each student selects a theme within one of the topics for a research paper.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 332W Stalinism

In the early 1930s Joseph Stalin consolidated his one-man dictatorship in the USSR. He and his lieutenants revolutionized Soviet society and created a new and unique political and economic system, in large part through the use of state terror. In 1941-1945 Stalin led the Soviet Union in its death struggle with Nazi Germany; in the late 1940s and early 1950s he was one of the architects of the Cold War. In this class we will study social, political, economic and cultural aspects of Stalinism. The course will be focused on discussion of readings and writing of an original research paper, about 20 pages long.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 333W Russia in East Asia

We begin with the study of various approaches to analyzing the relations between societies balance of power realism, world systems theory, and anthropological/cultural analyses. We then use these analytical tools to examine relations between Russia and neighboring societies in East Asia over the last 150 years, beginning with the Chinese cession of the Amur region to Russia in 1858 and concluding with discussion of current competition for access to fossil fuel resources in the region. We will discuss episodes such as the Russian-Chinese-Japanese competition for influence in Korea in the 1880s, the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway, the Russo-Japanese War, Soviet border policy and the undeclared war with Japan in the 1930s, the Soviet deportation of 700,000 Koreans from border regions in 1937-1938, the Korean War of 1950-1953, and Sino-Soviet relations after the victory of the Chinese Communist revolution in 1949. Class will be mostly devoted to discussion of readings and preparation of a final paper.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 334W The Soviet Union and the Cold War

This seminar, based around discussion of readings and a major research paper, will be focused on the Soviet side of the Cold War, including the conflict's impact on Soviet culture, society, daily life, and the economy.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 337 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 337W George Orwell and the Twentieth Century

This course will approach the tortured history of the 20th century by way of the life and writings of George Orwell. Best known for his late dystopian novels 1984 and Animal Farm, Orwell wrote many other memorable books and essays commenting on the signal events of his time. He experienced first hand (among other things): India, the British Empire, the Depression, the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, post-war austerity and affluence, and the Cold War. And he wrote about them all with unrivaled clarity and force. Students will immerse themselves in Orwell’s life, work, and times and write a substantial research paper on a relevant topic of their own choice and design.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 338W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 339W N/A

No description

HIS 340W Modernity through East Asian Eyes

What is modernity? What does it mean in China, Japan, and Korea? These are vital questions---but let’s not be scared away just because they seem abstract. We will seek answers together through history, literature, and film. Each week we will discuss a theme (such as WAR, POWER, TIME, and RESISTANCE) through films and readings that help us see the puzzle one piece at a time. Our goal is to uncover how modernity has been experienced and pictured on the other side of the globe. In the process, we may gain not only a better understanding of East Asia, but also of ourselves. Note: this seminar assumes at least some basic knowledge of Asian history or society. Contact the instructor if you have not taken at least one course on Asia.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 341 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 341W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 342 N/A

No description

HIS 342W Rich China, Poor China

The modern Chinese state has been shaped by its efforts to tackle economic strains. Imperial China collapsed in the throes of foreign imperialism and trade deficits. Republican China, being one of the few silver-standard countries in a gold-standard world, ran out of luck in fighting inflation. Socialist China became obsessed with a self-reliant economy, and established a state industry at the costs of impoverishing the entire rural population. And today, while China holds gigantic foreign reserves and launches spectacular Olympics and space ships, social welfare and individual rights have receded into a dim future. After toiling for gross economic surplus, will the Chinese people finally be the masters that share the fortune of the state? Come join me in this century-long and still ongoing journey, and learn the story of modern China’s search for wealth and power.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 343W N/A

No description

HIS 344W N/A

No description

HIS 345W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 346W N/A

No description

HIS 347W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2010

HIS 348W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 349W N/A

No description

HIS 350W Captives: Past, Present, and Future (1500-2100)

Who or what is a captive? Traditionally, the term describes a person unwillingly held by colonial pirates, invading soldiers and slave traders. This advanced seminar challenges us to consider the continued practice of captivity in our present-day societies. How do prisons, migrant detention centers, and guerrillas draw on former strategies of coercion and control? How integral is the denial of personhood to these practices, past and present? What of non-human captives? This course focuses on Latin American countries (Mexico, Brazil, Colombia) and the United States, but our readings will include comparisons to Africa, the Middle East and Mediterranean. We will explore how historical narratives of captivity are crafted, voiced, but also silenced. The following themes (and others) will be studied this semester: ransom, captive migrants, captive animals, sexual trafficking and imprisonment. Students will produce one short essay and a research paper on a topic of their choice. The seminar meets once a week.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 351W Urban History of Latin America, 1850-present

Although today the vast majority of Latin America's population lives in large metropolitan areas, at the turn of the twentieth century, the region was largely agrarian and rural. This course looks at the actual growth process of the city where trains and immigration led to subway systems and iconic soccer stadiums in cities like Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro and Lima. The course also focuses on challenges, such as environmental effects, slum neighborhoods and political conflict, which accompany such exponential growth. Students will explore course themes and topics through a combination of primary and secondary sources, film and literature.  Prior knowledge of Latin American history is not required.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 352 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 352W Racial Democracies: Mexico vs. Brazil

Mexico and Brazil are countries with complex cultural, racial and ethnic histories. This seminar will explore the process by which these two countries grappled with their diverse populations during the modern era and how policies and attitudes impacted citizens, residents and perceptions. The course will investigate the limitations that arose from Mexico’s pursuit of a “cosmic race” and how the myth of Brazil’s “racial democracy” was created and debunked. We will debate the durability of these constructions and the limitations that arise from cross-country comparisons.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 353 N/A

No description

HIS 353W N/A

No description

HIS 354W N/A

No description

HIS 355W N/A

No description

HIS 356 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 356W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 357 N/A

No description

HIS 357W America and the Holocaust

This seminar considers both the role of the United States as a "bystander" nation during the destruction of European Jewry by the Nazis in World War II and the place of the Holocaust in postwar American culture. Readings and films include The Diary of Anne Frank, Maus, Judgment at Nuremberg, Sophie's Choice, and Schindler's List. Two short papers and one substantial research paper.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 358W N/A

No description

HIS 359 BIRTH IN THE NATION

No description

HIS 359W Birth in the Nation: A History of Reproduction in the United States

Childbirth is often viewed as a “natural” female biological function. As a result, many people assume that birthing is essentially the same across historical eras and cultures. In this class, we will take the opposite approach to the topics of childbirth and reproductive health. Our objective will be to explore how women’s reproductive experiences and the meanings attached to such experiences have changed over time and why. We will consider topics such as the evolution of the field of obstetrics, the decline and resurgence of midwifery, politics and policies surrounding infant and maternal mortality, and the development and availability of various reproductive technologies. This is a research seminar, so students will further explore these issues through their own research and writing on some aspect of the history of reproduction. Readings and discussions will focus on the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, but students may explore the location and period of their choice in their papers.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 360W America and the World to 1865

An introductory course for graduate students planning to take a teaching field in American History. It is about the age of Europe's empires (c.1500-1865) and the rise of their global hegemony. It is about the causes, consequences, and spread of an international market economy as both the impulse (cause) of European political expansion and the partner (sponsor) of imperialism. About 400 pages of reading per week, two essays and a final exam.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 361 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 361W America and the World since 1865

Explores the major interpretations of American history from Reconstruction to the late 20th c. resurgence of conservatism. Senior history majors may register by invitation only.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 362W American Thought: Topics course

Selected topics in American thought, treating it in its social, political, and cultural context.

HIS 363W American Culture in the Great Depression and World War II

This course is an investigation of American cultural life during the Great Depression and Second World War (1929-1945). Emphasis on the interpretation of primary resources. Class will examine a range of material: autobiography, reportage, novels, movies, art, architecture, material culture, photography, social thought, and music. No prerequisites, though HIS 148 and/or HIS 252 would be helpful. Reading and discussion; two short papers and one longer paper.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 364 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2011

HIS 364W The Black Family in Slavery and Freedom

Almost four hundred years of slavery and racial discrimination have taken a toll on the black family. Despite this, the family has demonstrated a remarkable resilience as it has adapted to the demands of both slavery and freedom. Today, however, as the number of black millionaires grows rapidly, poverty in the nation expands exponentially. The course readings, class discussions, and assignments will seek to explain the huge disparities in wealth within the black community, identify their origin, and examine the scholarly claims that the very future of the black family in America is at risk.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 365W Topics in Early American History

This seminar introduces students to recent scholarship in the study of early America. Topics and approaches may include slavery and the formation of African-American culture, Revolutionary resistance, Euro-Indian encounters, religion and witchcraft, micro-history, gender roles, warfare, and environmental history. Using selected monographs, we will not only examine various interpretations of past events, but also dissect texts to discern how historians use evidence from the past to construct historical narratives - how historians "make" history.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 366W 18th Century Anglo-America

Readings on the history and historiography of 18th c. Great Britain, the European Empires, and North America from the Glorious Revolution through the American Revolution, adoption of the US Constitution, and the presidencies of George Washington and John Adams. The readings will address social, political, intellectual, and cultural issues, the history of slavery, race relations, religion, the environment, immigration, and American Indians.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 367W Topics in Revolutionary America

This course explores the roots of the American Revolution and uses recent scholarship to consider how the war affected a wide array of Americans. We will also situate the American Revolution in its Atlantic and global contexts as we examine the course of the war and its enduring legacies.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 368W

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Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 369

No description

HIS 369W GLOBAL AMERICA 1865-PRESENT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 370W

No description

HIS 371 Religion, Politics, and the Culture War

A culture war rages in American politics today. The Democratic and Republican parties are divided over an array of social issues — abortion, homosexuality, transgender rights, gun control, religious freedom laws, contraception coverage, family values, and capital punishment — and this division is reinforced by religious cleavages. Those who adhere to conservative religious traditions and maintain active ties with their congregations tend to vote Republican, while secular Americans vote overwhelmingly Democratic. But this culture war, and its religious underpinnings, is a relatively recent development. As late as the 1970s, few Americans paid attention to these social issues, and neither major party took stands on these issues. In this course, we will examine the origins of the culture war, analyze its relationship to the American party system, and consider the role of religion in the political sphere.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 371W Religion, Politics, and the Culture War

A culture war rages in American politics today. The Democratic and Republican parties are divided over an array of social issues — abortion, homosexuality, transgender rights, gun control, religious freedom laws, contraception coverage, family values, and capital punishment — and this division is reinforced by religious cleavages. Those who adhere to conservative religious traditions and maintain active ties with their congregations tend to vote Republican, while secular Americans vote overwhelmingly Democratic. But this culture war, and its religious underpinnings, is a relatively recent development. As late as the 1970s, few Americans paid attention to these social issues, and neither major party took stands on these issues. In this course, we will examine the origins of the culture war, analyze its relationship to the American party system, and consider the role of religion in the political sphere.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 372W Topics in 20th Century US History

A research seminar in 20th century American history. Some common reading in recent work in the field will be coupled with independent, individualized student research projects.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 373W American Health Policy and Politics

This course examines the formation and evolution of American health policy from a political and historical perspective. Concentrating on developments from the early twentieth century to the present, the focus of readings and discussions will be political forces and institutions and historical and cultural contexts. Among the topics covered are periodic campaigns for national health insurance, efforts to rationalize and regionalize health care institutions, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid and the further evolution of these programs, the rise to dominance of economists and economic analysis in the shaping of health policy, incremental and state-based vs. universal and federal initiatives, the formation and failure of the Clinton administration’s health reform agenda, and national health reform efforts during the Obama administration.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 374W

No description

HIS 375W Benjamin Franklin's America

This research seminar explores political, cultural, intellectual, and scientific topics in colonial America, circa 1710 to 1790 through the multifaceted figure of Benjamin Franklin.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 376W N/A

No description

HIS 377 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 377W Emergence of the Modern Congress

Through intensive reading and discussion, we will analyze the major institutional features of Congress, with an emphasis on historical development. We will examine the basic institutions of the House and Senate--committees, parties, leaders, and rules. In doing this, we will consider the rise of careerism, the seniority system, agenda-setting, electoral concerns, divided government, efforts at institutional reform, party polarization, gridlock, and the Senate filibuster.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 378 Urban Change and City Politics

Through reading and research, this course examines major issues in urban politics, history, and sociology. This course is a seminar, intended for advanced undergraduates with a substantial background in the social sciences.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 378W Urban Change and City Politics

Through reading and research, this course examines major issues in urban politics, history, and sociology. This course is a seminar, intended for advanced undergraduates with a substantial background in the social sciences.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 379W N/A

No description

HIS 380W The Visual Culture of Heritage and Identity

Cultural critic Stuart Hall has observed that Heritage is a discursive practice. It is one of the ways in which the nation slowly constructs for itself a sort of collective social memory. This upper level seminar will look at case studies of how people (through the collectivities of gender, ethnicity, race, or nation) construct visual narratives about the past. Among the topics for consideration are Holocaust memorials, Native American and Polynesian museums and cultural centers, African American quilt histories, and even individual artists projects of the last few decades (Judy Chicago, Fred Wilson, Silvia Gruner, José Bedia, and Jolene Rickard, among others). We will see how various constituencies have borrowed from what Arjun Appadurai has called a warehouse of cultural scenarios in order to construct a useable past that supplies what is needed in the present, irrespective of its relationship to the verifiable realities of the past.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 381 N/A

No description

HIS 381W Just and Unjust Wars

This research seminar considers the concepts of just and unjust war and the application of just war theory to specific historical cases. Together we will take a historical overview of the theories and then students will research a particular case within a larger historical context. You will identify research questions, primary and secondary sources, and your approach to the problem. We will meet to discuss shared readings, one-page research proposals, bibliographies, thesis statements and first paragraphs, and first drafts of research papers. Students will write at least two drafts of their final paper, each twenty to thirty pages in length.

HIS 382W Apocalypse Now...and Then: A History of Apocalyptic Thought

This seminar examines the history of beliefs about the end of the world in the western Judeo-Christian tradition. We will examine such topics as the birth of apocalyptic thought, the medieval development of various aspects of traditions about the End (such as the figure of Antichrist and millenarian traditions), millennial influences on the discovery and colonization of the New World, millennial movements of the last two centuries (such as the Millerites and the Mormons), and contemporary apocalyptic scenarios. A major theme of the course will be the flexibility of apocalyptic language, its ability to interpret various historical situations, and its power to move people to acceptance or action.

Last Offered: Fall 2018

HIS 383

No description

HIS 383W Disease and Society from Antiquity to the Present

What is the relationship between disease and the society in which it strikes? How do societies define disease, and how does culture affect the treatment of the sick? How have scholars written the history of disease? In this research seminar, students will explore such questions by examining interactions between disease and society in western cultures from antiquity through the present, at the same time pondering what this insight can tell us as we face the frightening prospect of new killers like Ebola and resistant strains of old diseases like tuberculosis. Throughout, the course will insist that the experience of disease is not simply a biological fact, but is conditioned by the culture in which we live.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 384 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 384W

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 385W N/A

No description

HIS 386 THE OTHER ATLANTIC: ETHNOHISTORY, CHRONICLE, AND MEMORY

This seminar engages the experiences, writings and political ambitions of individuals typically excluded from discussions of the “Atlantic.” Key concepts such as “Atlantic creoles” and the “Black Atlantic” will be debated in light of recent studies on Sephardic merchants, African healers and Native American intellectuals. In order to contextualize their lives, this course will focus on the Iberian and South Atlantic from the early sixteenth to the late nineteenth century. Our initial readings will center on the circulation of Native American commoners and elites to Spain and will be complemented by seminal ethnohistorical studies. The second part of the course will take on the construction of a South or “Lusophone ocean” that weaves together the histories of Brazilian, Angolan and Portuguese actors. In the closing weeks of the course, students will produce an original research paper on a topic of their choice.

HIS 386W N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

HIS 387W N/A

No description

HIS 388W N/A

No description

HIS 389W Senior Seminar

No description

HIS 390 Supervised Teaching

Individual instruction in the teaching of history under the supervision of a faculty member.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2019

HIS 391W Independent Study

Designed for junior and senior students who wish to pursue an independent reading program with a professor; required for honors program participants. Upper-level writing credit awarded if students prepare and revise an extended essay.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 392 N/A

No description

HIS 392W PRACTICUM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 393 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 393W Senior Project

For seniors writing an extended essay under faculty supervision. Upper-level writing credit awarded if students prepare and revise an extended essay.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 394 Public History Internship

Experience in an applied setting supervised on site. Approved and overseen by a University instructor.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 394W N/A

No description

HIS 395 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 395W Independent Research

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 396W N/A

No description

HIS 398 Honors Research Seminar (2 credits)

A forum in which students can present preliminary versions of their theses and get critical feedback from both their student colleagues and the instructor.

Last Offered: Spring 2019

HIS 399 Advanced Archaeology Field and Research Methods

Using Smiths Island, Bermuda, and a historical laboratory, this course trains experienced archaeology students in advanced field and research techniques, which may include geophysical remote sensing surveys, recording and GIS manipulation of digital site information, advanced lab analysis and artifact identification methods, independent historical research focused on site-specific questions, and independent field supervision of site and/or test pit excavations, depending on the interests of students.

Last Offered: Summer 2018

HIS 399A N/A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2013