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Graduate Program

Courses

Courses currently being offered:

Fall >
Spring >

Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.


Below you will find a list of all graduate courses that have been offered.
NOTE: Not all of these courses are offered in any given year.

HIS 400 The History of Nature

This course explores the history of the idea and condition of nature from ancient times to the present. Drawing on contemporary historical scholarship as well as a range of thinkers and writers from Petrarch to Thoreau and beyond, we will study the many ways in which humans have thought about and treated the natural world around them and how the natural world has shaped human history in turn. Some background in history is recommended.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 401 Modernity and Modernism: Topics course

A study of selected topics in the history of modern thought and culture in Europe and the United States.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 402 The Power of Print

This course will examine the history of books, readers, and literacy in the United States from the colonial period to the present. It will explore how the printed word shaped both public events (e.g. the Civil War) and private experience (e.g. relationships within the family). The course will consider such topics as: the relationships between gender and reading; the connections between reading and citizenship; the impact of technological change on the book; the social uses of various kinds of reading; and the nature and development of literacy.

HIS 403 International Human Rights

What does it mean to be human? What political, economic, religious, social, or sexual rights might be part of different people's working definitions? This course will look at both a) the historical development of conflicting theories of human rights and b) more contemporary debates about their ideal extent, their exercise, and their enforcement. Special topics will include debates over the meaning of the American and French Revolutions, the fight to design an International Declaration of Human Rights in the aftermath of World War II, the history of organizations such as Amnesty International, and the controversy around UN events such as the 1995 World Conference on Women in Beijing, the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro, and the 2000 and 2005 Millennium Summits in New York City.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 404 Readings in Atlantic History

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 405 Maritime Atlantic World

Study of European expansion into Africa and the Americas from the ages of Discovery to Revolution has taken many forms. Some pursued their investigations topically (slavery, migration, economic development, etc.) and others focused on particular colonies or regions. We shift the focus of inquiry to the Atlantic Ocean itself, as the geographic center of an expanding European world. Rather than treat the ocean as peripheral while studying the settlement of the Atlantic coast, we will be primarily concerned with activities that took place upon its watery face, delving into the lives of the tens of thousands of mariners who were catalysts in identity formation, migration, and economic development. Our focus will be on three topics: migration, (forced and free), maritime activities (seafaring, shipping, and fishing), and trade (how merchants did business and integrated regional economies). By the end, you will hopefully appreciate the centrality of the sea to the development of Africa, Europe, and the Americas.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 406 Evolution of the Current World Economic Order from 1500

The course traces the historical origins of the integration and hierarchical structure of the current global economy. It examines specifically the historical forces which produced the unequal international division of labor between industrial and non-industrial nations, starting with the British Industrial Revolution which occurred within the Atlantic world economy. The rise and fall of the USSR and the command economies of Eastern Europe are examined in the context of efforts by underdeveloped countries to improve their performance and location within the global economy. The more recent successes of some Asian countries and the continuing external debt problems of Latin American and African countries are also examined with the conceptual framework of international political economy to predict the probable future of all poor peoples both in the poor and in the rich countries.

HIS 407 Socioeconomic Development of the Atlantic World

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2010

HIS 408 The Global City

As of 2007, the majority of the world population has lived in cities. This course explores the development of global urbanism since 1945. Placing the global city in the historical context of urban settlement, we will focus on new forms of urban political and social organization, both formal and informal, as they have developed in the contemporary city. We will engage a range of complex policy issues confronting the global city, including issues of environmental and social justice, global markets and migrant labor, the infrastructural challenges of large-scale urban settlement, squatter communities and informal urbanism, and urban planning and governance. 

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 409 The Mediterranean World, 1400-1800

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 410 The Political Economy of Food in Africa

By the middle of the 19th c. a highly integrated economic system, called the Atlantic Economic Order, had emerged, linking together through a web of multilateral trade the economies of the Atlantic basin that remained unconnected in the late 15th c. The economies of Africa occupied the lowest position within this Economic Order. We examine the extent to which the Transatlantic Slave Trade could help explain this weak position. Beginning with a general view of the level of socioeconomic development in Africa by the late 15th c., relative to other regions in the Atlantic basin, we will proceed to examine the impact of the Atlantic slave trade on the competitive development of commodity production in Africa for the evolving Atlantic market of the period, as well as the socioeconomic and political consequences of the export slave trade within Africa. One major theme of the course is the extent to which the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade limited the development of capitalism in Africa during the period in question.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 411 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africa, 1650-1851

By the middle of the 19th c. a highly integrated economic system, called the Atlantic Economic Order, had emerged, linking together through a web of multilateral trade the economies of the Atlantic basin that remained unconnected in the late 15th c. The economies of Africa occupied the lowest position within this Economic Order. We examine the extent to which the Transatlantic Slave Trade could help explain this weak position. Beginning with a general view of the level of socioeconomic development in Africa by the late 15th c., relative to other regions in the Atlantic basin, we will proceed to examine the impact of the Atlantic slave trade on the competitive development of commodity production in Africa for the evolving Atlantic market of the period, as well as the socioeconomic and political consequences of the export slave trade within Africa. One major theme of the course is the extent to which the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade limited the development of capitalism in Africa during the period in question.

HIS 412 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 413 N/A

No description

HIS 414 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 415 N/A

No description

HIS 416 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 417 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 418 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 419 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 420 Topics in Medieval European History

Selected problems in the political, social, and intellectual history of the Middle Ages.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 421 Topics in Early Modern European History

Although most people in early modern Europe lived in rural settings, cities assumed new importance during this period. We will examine these cities as capitols for newly centralized empires and as engines of commerce while also considering how urban communities responded to challenges such as poverty, crime, demographic change, and social unrest. Through case studies including Venice, Amsterdam, London, Seville, and Constantinople, we will also explore how cities brought together elite values and the ‘culture of the street’ and thus played a key role in transitions from medieval to modern society.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 422 Topics in European Cultural History

Novels, plays, music, dance, poetry, painting ... How can we use individual artistic creations as a way of learning about the politics, economics, social structures, and psychological attitudes of the past? This course will answer that question by focusing on a series of modern European examples from the French Revolution through the Second World War.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 423 World War II: Eastern Front

This course is centered on class discussion of the readings. There will be little lecture time. We will focus on the history of the Soviet Union's struggle with Nazi Germany from 1941-1945, the largest and bloodiest military conflict in human history. Readings will deal with the Holocaust, the history of military operations, the Red Army's "learning curve" in its battle with the Wehrmacht, and everyday life on Nazi-occupied territory as well as the Soviet "home front." Viewing and discussion of documentary and fictional films will be a significant part of the class.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 424 19th Century City

In seminar format, this course explores the development and character of both large and small cities in modern Europe, with more extended (but not exclusive) attention to the central European experience. We will consider the transformation of urban space during the epochal era from the late eighteenth through the late-twentieth centuries, looking at the processes of nation-building, industrialization, and commercialization, the development of mass or class cultures, and the urban dynamics of integration vs. fragmentation, private vs. public spaces, and control vs. freedom. Cities have played a crucial role in the development of European societies, often encapsulating the differences among them, while at the same time providing a space of mixing across ethnic, national, and class lines.

HIS 425 Microhistory

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 426 HISTORY OF ADVENTURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 427 REAL EXISTING SOCIALISM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 428 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 429 HISTORY OF FRIENDSHIP

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 430 War, Money, and Ordinary People

This course covers topics such as the changing nature of warfare, the lives of ordinary people, how the state attempted to control their private lives. It also looks at the global world which had emerged along with the growth of national feeling.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 431 Europe in 1215

Three events taking place in 1215 provide windows for close looks into the Medieval world of Western Europe. (1) The movement for a measure of control over the rapidly expanding royal power in England produced the Magna Carta. (2) The Fourth Lateran Council legislated important elements for the centralizing and papal-directed church and stimulated the creation of a theology to reach the laity more fully. (3) Poets began writing the vast prose cycle of Arthurian, chivalric romances that we know as the Vulgate or Lancelot-Grail cycle. In short, the course considers politics, law and constitutionalism in the growth of medieval monarchy, the centralizing clerical church and its relationship with the laity, and the world of Arthurian romance. We will take up each subject in turn before each student selects a theme within one of the topics for a research paper.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 432 Stalinism

In the early 1930s Joseph Stalin consolidated his one-man dictatorship in the USSR. He and his lieutenants revolutionized Soviet society and created a new and unique political and economic system, in large part through the use of state terror. In 1941-1945 Stalin led the Soviet Union in its death struggle with Nazi Germany; in the late 1940s and early 1950s he was one of the architects of the Cold War. In this class we will study social, political, economic and cultural aspects of Stalinism. The course will be focused on discussion of readings and writing of an original research paper, about 20 pages long.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 433 Russia in East Asia

We begin with the study of various approaches to analyzing the relations between society’s balance of power realism, world systems theory, and anthropological/cultural analyses. We then use these analytical tools to examine relations between Russia and neighboring societies in East Asia over the last 150 years, beginning with the Chinese cession of the Amur region to Russia in 1858 and concluding with discussion of current competition for access to fossil fuel resources in the region. We will discuss episodes such as the Russian-Chinese-Japanese competition for influence in Korea in the 1880s, the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway, the Russo-Japanese War, Soviet border policy and the undeclared war with Japan in the 1930s, the Soviet deportation of 700,000 Koreans from border regions in 1937-1938, the Korean War of 1950-1953, and Sino-Soviet relations after the victory of the Chinese Communist revolution in 1949. Class will be mostly devoted to discussion of readings and preparation of a final paper.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 434 The Soviet Union and the Cold War

This seminar, based around discussion of readings and a major research paper, will be focused on the Soviet side of the Cold War, including the conflict's impact on Soviet culture, society, daily life, and the economy.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 435 The Age of Great Cities: Europe in the Nineteenth Century

No description

HIS 436 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 437 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 438 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 439 N/A

No description

HIS 440 Modernity through East Asian Eyes

What is modernity? What does it mean in China, Japan, and Korea? These are vital questions---but let’s not be scared away just because they seem abstract. We will seek answers together through history, literature, and film. Each week we will discuss a theme (such as WAR, POWER, TIME, and RESISTANCE) through films and readings that help us see the puzzle one piece at a time. Our goal is to uncover how modernity has been experienced and pictured on the other side of the globe. In the process, we may gain not only a better understanding of East Asia, but also of ourselves. Note: this seminar assumes at least some basic knowledge of Asian history or society. Contact the instructor if you have not taken at least one course on Asia.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 441 Culture and Religion of the Indian Ocean

Long before the beginning of European expansion in the sixteenth century, the Indian Ocean constituted a cosmopolitan arena within which traders, religious scholars and mystics affiliated with different world religions circulated with minimal friction. Even during the period of high colonialism, when most shipping was controlled by Christian Europeans, Hindu, Buddhist and Islamic scholars continued to circulate throughout the region. This course will explore the transformations all four religious traditions underwent as they interacted during the last two centuries in this region. Readings include: Peter van der Veer, Imperial Encounters; Sugata Bose, A Hundred Horizons; Engseng Ho, The Graves of Tarim; Peter Metcalf, Imperial Connections.

HIS 442 Rich China, Poor China

The modern Chinese state has been shaped by its efforts to tackle economic strains. Imperial China collapsed in the throes of foreign imperialism and trade deficits. Republican China, being one of the few silver-standard countries in a gold-standard world, ran out of luck in fighting inflation. Socialist China became obsessed with a self-reliant economy, and established a state industry at the costs of impoverishing the entire rural population. And today, while China holds gigantic foreign reserves and launches spectacular Olympics and space ships, social welfare and individual rights have receded into a dim future. After toiling for gross economic surplus, will the Chinese people finally be the masters that share the fortune of the state? Come join me in this century-long and still ongoing journey, and learn the story of modern China’s search for wealth and power.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 443 N/A

No description

HIS 444 N/A

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HIS 445 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

HIS 446 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2011

HIS 447 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2010

HIS 448 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 449 N/A

No description

HIS 450 Of Captors and Captives

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 451 Urban History in Latin America, 1850-present

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 452 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 453 N/A

No description

HIS 454 N/A

No description

HIS 455 N/A

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HIS 456 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

HIS 457 N/A

No description

HIS 458 Women's Lives and Letters: America 1830-1880

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 459 N/A

No description

HIS 460 America and the World to 1865

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

HIS 461 American and the World since 1865

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 462 American Thought: Topics course

Selected topics in American thought, treating it in its social, political, and cultural context.

HIS 463 American Culture in the Great Depression and World War II

This course is an investigation of American cultural life during the Great Depression and Second World War (1929-1945). Emphasis on the interpretation of primary resources. Class will examine a range of material: autobiography, reportage, novels, movies, art, architecture, material culture, photography, social thought, and music. No prerequisites, though HIS 148 and/or HIS 252 would be helpful. Reading and discussion; two short papers and one longer paper.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

HIS 464 The Black Family in Slavery and Freedom

After a discussion of the Moynihan Report controversy and an assessment of the literature on the black family, the readings will investigate why and how stable black families were encouraged, and how they developed under slavery. The impact of factors such as economics, politics, religion, gender, medicine, and the proximity of free families, on the structure of the black family will be given special attention. In this way, the structure of the slave family on the eve of Emancipation, and its preparedness for freedom, will be tested and assessed. Students will be encouraged to identify persistent links between the "history" of slavery and the black family, and the development of social policy.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 465 Topics in Early American History

This seminar introduces students to recent scholarship in the study of early America. Topics and approaches may include slavery and the formation of African-American culture, Revolutionary resistance, Euro-Indian encounters, religion and witchcraft, micro-history, gender roles, warfare, and environmental history. Using selected monographs, we will not only examine various interpretations of past events, but also dissect texts to discern how historians use evidence from the past to construct historical narratives - how historians "make" history.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

HIS 466 18th Century Anglo-America

Readings on the history and historiography of 18th c. Great Britain, the European Empires, and North America from the Glorious Revolution through the American Revolution, adoption of the US Constitution, and the presidencies of George Washington and John Adams. The readings will address social, political, intellectual, and cultural issues, the history of slavery, race relations, religion, the environment, immigration, and American Indians.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 467 Topics in Revolutionary America

This course explores the roots of the American Revolution and uses recent scholarship to consider how the war affected a wide array of Americans. We will also situate the American Revolution in its Atlantic and global contexts as we examine the course of the war and its enduring legacies.

HIS 468 American Culture at Mid-Twentieth Century, 1946-1975

The seminar addresses the central themes of American cultural life in the mid-twentieth century -- the growing importance of psychological explanation, the emphasis on remaking norms, and the difficulties in maintaining or find oneself. Among the issues considered are the contributions of Jews and African-Americans, abstract expressionism, the rise of youth as cultural producers, the new sexuality, and feminism.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 469 Benjamin Franklin's America

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 470 Topics in 19th Century American Cultural History

No description

HIS 471 Topics in 20th Century American Cultural History

This course concentrates on the cultural and intellectual ferment of the first twenty years of the twentieth century spurred by the growing acceptance of the idea that no single principle could account fully for diverse phenomena. In many fields of inquiry, the notion that there were many truths, many values, and many beauties challenged the way of the world. As a result, American cultural and intellectual life featured a sense that the world was not already made, that standards were not firm and fixed, that accepted hierarchies were not always valid, and that contingency and context mattered. Among the fields of inquiry we will address are popular culture, philosophy, political science, psychology, and anthropology.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 472 Topics in 20th Century US History

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

HIS 473 American Health Policy and Politics

This course examines the formation and evolution of American health policy from a political and historical perspective. Concentrating primarily on developments from 1932 to the mid-1990s, readings and seminar discussions focus on political forces and institutions and on historical and cultural contexts. Among the topics covered are periodic campaigns for national health insurance, efforts to rationalize and regionalize health care institutions, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid and the further evolution of these programs, the rise of dominance of economists and economic analysis in the shaping of health policy, incremental and state-based vs. universal and federal initiatives, and the formation and failure of the Clinton administration's health reform agenda.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 474 Topics in American Social Thought

This course delves into the conceptions and understanding that Americans have devised to understand their collective life. Emphasis on formal thought that maps the structure of society and dynamics of social activity. Topics will vary from year to year but among possible investigations are American understanding of capitalism, the nature of social justice, and the problem of social cohesion.

HIS 475 When New York was the Wild West

This course explores New York’s history from Seneca settlement to Seneca Falls, using recent scholarship to consider Iroquois, Dutch, English, and American periods of history. Specific topics include New York City and its hinterland, the shift from Dutch to English rule, Slavery in New York City, British-occupied New York and the American Revolution in New York State, 18th and 19th century religious movements, the dynamics of frontier settlement, and the Erie Canal. Students will devise and write an original primary research paper on a particular aspect or period of New York history.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 476 Plantation Societies in the Americas

No description

HIS 477 Emergence of the Modern Congress

Through intensive reading and discussion, we will analyze the major institutional features of Congress, with an emphasis on historical development. We will examine the basic institutions of the House and Senate--committees, parties, leaders, and rules. In doing this, we will consider the rise of careerism, the seniority system, agenda-setting, electoral concerns, divided government, efforts at institutional reform, party polarization, gridlock, and the Senate filibuster.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 478 The Seward Family's Civil War

A hands-on introduction to web-design and historical editing using the Papers of William Henry Seward (1801-1872), Governor of New York, US Senator, and Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War. The Rush Rhees Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation Department holds the collection, which contains Seward’s public and private correspondence, and that of family members, including his wife, five children, and their extended family. The course will include background reading on the Civil War era, technical instruction on web design in a computer lab, transcribing, editing, annotating historical manuscripts using the original documents, and participation in construction of a website for a digital edition of the papers. This course is a prerequisite for HIS 320: Seward Family in Peace and War, and internships working on the Seward Family digital editorial project.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

HIS 479 The Seward Family in Peace and War

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 480 The Visual Culture of Heritage and Identity

Cultural critic Stuart Hall has observed that Heritage is a discursive practice. It is one of the ways in which the nation slowly constructs for itself a sort of collective social memory. This upper level seminar will look at case studies of how people (through the collectivities of gender, ethnicity, race, or nation) construct visual narratives about the past. Among the topics for consideration are Holocaust memorials, Native American and Polynesian museums and cultural centers, African American quilt histories, and even individual artists projects of the last few decades (Judy Chicago, Fred Wilson, Silvia Gruner, José Bedia, and Jolene Rickard, among others). We will see how various constituencies have borrowed from what Arjun Appadurai has called a warehouse of cultural scenarios in order to construct a useable past that supplies what is needed in the present, irrespective of its relationship to the verifiable realities of the past.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 481 Just and Unjust Wars

The seminar considers the concept of just war and the application of just war theory to specific historical cases. Together we will discuss several models Arendt, Augustine, Clausewitz, and Waltzer at the beginning of the semester, and at least one scholars application of theory to a specific case. Students will identify the specific war on which they intend to focus their research, primary and secondary sources they will consult, and the questions they will ask. At different stages we will meet to discuss shared readings, one-page research proposals, bibliographies, thesis statements, first paragraphs, and first drafts of research papers.

HIS 482 Apocalypse Now...and Then: A History of Apocalyptic Thought

This seminar examines the history of beliefs about the end of the world in the western Judeo-Christian tradition. We will examine such topics as the birth of apocalyptic thought, the medieval development of various aspects of traditions about the End (such as the figure of Antichrist and millenarian traditions), millennial influences on the discovery and colonization of the New World, millennial movements of the last two centuries (such as the Millerites and the Mormons), and contemporary apocalyptic scenarios. A major theme of the course will be the flexibility of apocalyptic language, its ability to interpret various historical situations, and its power to move people to acceptance or action.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

HIS 483 Disease and Society from Antiquity to the Present

What is the relationship between disease and the society in which it strikes? How do societies define disease, and how does culture affect the treatment of the sick? How have scholars written the history of disease? In this research seminar, students will explore such questions by examining interactions between disease and society in western cultures from antiquity through the present, at the same time pondering what this insight can tell us as we face the frightening prospect of new killers like Ebola and resistant strains of old diseases like tuberculosis. Throughout, the course will insist that the experience of disease is not simply a biological fact, but is conditioned by the culture in which we live.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 484 The Family in History

Family history is a sub-field of study that grew over the past fifty years as an aspect of social and cultural history. During the first half of the semester, we will discuss shared foundational readings as students define their individual research project and present a proposal, bibliography, and thesis statement. All students will research and write two drafts of a primary-source based research paper in the range of 20-30 pages in length in addition to footnotes or endnotes and bibliography according to the Chicago Manual of Style. Students may, if they are interested, focus their research on the Seward Family Papers, of which a substantial number of letters have been transcribed over the past two years. This documentary editing project draws on the correspondence of the Seward family of Auburn, New York during the period 1817-1872.

Last Offered: Spring 2015

HIS 485 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 486 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 487 N/A

No description

HIS 488 Research Colloquium: Lewis Henry Morgan's Bicentennial

This colloquium will focus on the life, works and contested legacies of Lewis Henry Morgan (1818-1881), a Rochester attorney and founding figure of American anthropology. Students will conduct original research using archival materials and museum collections on campus and at local cultural institutions. This research will provide content for exhibitions, events, and a website to be planned in connection with the bicentennial of Morgan’s birth.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 489 Archaeology Field and Research Methods

Using Smiths Island, Bermuda, as a historical laboratory, this course trains students in archival research and archaeological survey, excavation, and lab analysis techniques and prepares them for professional work as historical archaeologists. Students will also learn about Bermudian and Atlantic historical developments, trade relations, and slavery and the African diaspora since 1610. Participants will also be introduced to archaeological conservation, museum studies, and underwater archaeological techniques. No prior archaeology experience is necessary.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 491 Reading Course at the Master's Level

Individual, specialized reading courses; topics, relevant to student's program, chosen in consultation with faculty member.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 495 Research at the Master's Level

Graduate level research course for the M.A. level.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 496 Extended Reading at the M.A.

Individual, specialized extended reading courses; topics, relevant to student's program, chosen in consultation with faculty member.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 498 ARCH FIELD&RESEARCH METHODS

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2015

HIS 499 ARCHLGY FIELD&RESRCH METHODS

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2017

HIS 500 Problems in Historical Analysis

This course addresses questions of interest to beginning graduate students in history. These may include: the history of the historical profession, styles of historical writing, relations between history and literature, ethno-history, and the functions of history as criticism and as social memory.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 501 Worlds of Inquiry

Introduces students to the interests of the Rochester faculty, which fall into three spheres of inquiry -- the world of nations, which emphasizes the complications of government, nationalism, war, and power; the world of goods, which concentrates on commerce and trade, the supporting institutions and the consequence of various modes of production and consumption, and students will read a sequence of exemplary works in each world — works that will acquaint them with the rudiments of each sphere, the problems under investigation and some of the solutions offered.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 502 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 503 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

HIS 510 Advanced Historical Studies

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 511 Readings in 19th Century American History

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 512 Research in 19th Century American Intellectual History

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 513 Readings in 20th Century American Intellectual History

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

HIS 514 Research in 20th Century American Intellectual History

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

HIS 520 Advanced Historical Studies

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 530 Advanced Historical Studies

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 590 Supervised Teaching in History

Individual instruction in the teaching of history under the supervision of a faculty member. For first-year Ph.D. students.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 591 Reading Course at the PhD Level

Individual, specialized reading courses; topics, relevant to student's program, chosen in consultation with faculty member.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 592 Independent Reading Course

Individual, specialized independent reading courses; topics, relevant to student's program, chosen in consultation with faculty member.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 593 Assisting in History

Experience, under faculty supervision, in conducting discussion sections and examinations in undergraduate history courses.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 595 Research at the PhD Level

Graduate level research course for the Ph.D. level.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 595A N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 596 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 890 N/A

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2011

HIS 895 Continuation of MA Enrollment

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 897 Master's Thesis in Absentia

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 899 Master's Thesis

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 899A N/A

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

HIS 899B N/A

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 985 Leave of Absence

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 986V FULL TIME VISITING STUDENT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 990 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2011

HIS 995 Continuation of PhD Enrollment

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 997 PhD Dissertation

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 997A PhD Dissertation In-Absentia

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 999 PhD Dissertation

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 999A Doctoral Dissertation in Absentia

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

HIS 999B PhD Dissertation In-Absentia Abroad

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018