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Graduate Program

Courses

The Department of Linguistics courses not only give a solid foundation to our own graduate program, but also complement studies in other programs, such as brain and cognitive sciencescomputer science, and philosophy.

Students who have never taken linguistics may be required to complete LIN 110: Introduction to Linguistic Analysis, along with other prerequisite courses, before taking their desired graduate course.

Courses currently being offered:

Fall >
Spring >

Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.


This is a list of all courses the Department of Linguistics has offered. These courses are often not taught every year. Please contact the department for more information on courses not offered in a given term.

LIN 405 HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS

This course is designed to give an introduction to the principles of linguistic variation and change, and to examine their practical application in the interdisciplinary subfields of historical linguistics and historical sociolinguistics. Topics covered include diachrony and synchrony, genetic relations, the comparative method and language classification, sound change, morphological, syntactic and semantic change, borrowing, types of language contact, areal linguistics, and linguistic variation and social stratification.

Prerequisites: LIN 110
Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 406 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANG

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

LIN 407 OLD ENGLISH LITERATURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 410 INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE SOUND SYSTEMS

The goal of this course is to provide a background for understanding the principles that underlie the structure of sound systems in human languages. Starting with the notion ‘phoneme’, the course focuses on acoustic and articulatory phonetics, as a basis for understanding phonological processes and change in linguistic sound forms. Students will acquire skills in the production, recognition, and transcription of sounds in various languages of the world. The course will serve as a foundation for work in language documentation, sociolinguistics and sociophonetics, morphology. This course can be taken as LIN 210 or as LIN 410 and is meant for linguistics majors and non-majors alike.

Prerequisites: LIN110
Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 416 SPEECH ON THE BRAIN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 420 INTRO TO GRAMMATICAL SYSTEMS

Syntax is the system of rules that we subconsciously follow when we construct sentences. The course is designed to introduce the grammatical principles that guide the building of structures. The students will acquire and apply the tools necessary for linguistic analysis of phrases and sentences. Built on data puzzles from English and some lesser studied non-Indo European languages, the students will gain insights into state of the art syntactic theory and lingering questions.

Prerequisites: LIN110
Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 424 INTRO TO COMPUTATIONAL LING

This course covers foundational concepts in computational linguistics and is designed for students with a strong background in formal linguistic methods but little or no programming experience. Major focus is placed on deploying techniques used in computational linguistics to advance linguistic theory as well as developing students' ability to implement these techniques. Topics include basic object-oriented programming in Python, basic formal language theory, probability theory and information theory, finite state phonological and morphological analysis, generative and discriminative models for shallow syntactic and semantic parsing, and bottom-up, top-down, and mixed algorithms for syntactic and semantic parsing.

Prerequisites: LIN110
Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 425 INTRODUCTION TO SEMANTIC ANALYSIS

This course introduces students to the basics of the analysis of meaning in natural language. The first section focuses on devices that motivate certain forms to take on the meanings they have. The second section of the course moves on to discuss how meanings combine to form meanings for larger units—how words and phrases combine to form sentences meanings. Using logical notation we illustrate the formal analysis of natural language meaning in terms of truth-conditions. We will discuss the basics of set theory, and investigate how meanings represented in these terms correlate with the syntactic and lexical structures of sentences of natural language. Students of graduate standing or those with strong formal backgrounds may consider starting with LIN 265/465 instead, for which this course is ordinarily a prerequisite. This course counts towards satisfying the core course requirement for majors.

Prerequisites: LIN110
Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 426 MORPHOLOGY

The course examines the structure and definition of the linguistic unit "word'" its typology and the relationship of the morphological component to other levels in the grammar. The course includes an introduction to analytical techniques with emphasis placed on an examination of data from a range of languages. The building blocks of words will be analyzed and topics such as affixation, reduplication and inflectional and derivational morphology will be covered. We will examine the properties of words and how they fit into the larger structure of linguistic knowledge, including the relationship between words and syntactic structure (ex., phrases and sentences) and the relationship between words and phonological structure (ex., phonological rules and prosodic structure).

Prerequisites: LIN110
Last Offered: Fall 2016

LIN 427 TOPICS PHONETICS & PHONOLOGY

This course is intended to provide participants with an overview of research in an area of phonetics and phonology. Issues vary from term to term but may cover areas in segmental, metrical and intonational phonology and the phonology/phonetics interface. This term we will be focusing on the phonological and sociolinguistic aspects of sound change. We will begin with foundational papers on the topic of sound change from both a historical and synchronic perspective. Students will learn about linguistic variation and ongoing change locally in the Inland North dialect area through the analysis of their own interview data. Past and recent studies of the Inland North will provide a framework for learning about the linguistic and social motivations of sound change.

Prerequisites: LIN 110, LIN 210
Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 428 LEXICAL SEMANTICS

In this course we investigate the study of word-meaning in current linguistics and cognitive science. We examine the meanings of lexical items such as verbs, nouns, adjectives, and prepositions, and also other categories of words, including various function words and discourse particles. We examine theories of word-meaning, and examine how words and vocabulary may vary between languages.

Prerequisites: : LIN 110, and either LIN 210, LIN 220 or LIN 225 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2017

LIN 430 SIGNE LANGUAGE STRUCTURE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 434 MODERN ENGLISH GRAMMAR

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

LIN 447 NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

LIN 448 STAT. SPEECH & LANG PROC

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 450 DATA SCIENCE FOR LINGUISTICS

This course addresses linguistic research questions through data science techniques. The course will focus on developing skills to (i) acquire and process a variety of language data, from using established corpora to capturing data in the wild, and (ii) to investigate language use, particularly syntactic and semantic phenomena, through descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. A significant part of the course will be devoted to hands-on projects and will include developing familiarity with using the programming languages Python and R to acquire and explore linguistic data. Familiarity with statistics and/or computational linguistics is advantageous, but not necessary.

Prerequisites: LIN110, and either LIN210, LIN220 or LIN225
Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 460 SYNTACTIC THEORY

This course picks up where LIN 220 leaves off, though focusing more on topics in natural language syntax from a cross-linguistic perspective. The goal of the course is an approach to syntax that accounts for both language-particular as well as universal constraints on language. Among the topics studied are head and phrase movement, constraints on co-reference (anaphora), elipsis, and agreement (phi features).

Prerequisites: LIN 110, LIN 220 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2017

LIN 461 PHRASE STRUCTURE GRAMMARS

This syntactic theory course examines syntactic phenomena from the perspective of phrase structure and lexicalist grammar as opposed to transformational grammar. The course will examine and develop phrase structure grammar (specifically Head-driven Phrase Structure Grammar) approaches to standard syntactic problems, contrasting them where appropriate with transformational approaches. No background in non-transformational approaches will be assumed. This course can be taken as LIN 261 or as LIN 461 and is meant for linguistics majors and non-majors alike.

Prerequisites: LIN110 , LIN225, OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR
Last Offered: Fall 2016

LIN 462 TOPICS IN EXPERIMENTAL SYNTAX

This course provides an introduction to experimental methods that can be used to investigate questions that are relevant for syntactic theory. We will discuss a range of methodologies, including self-paced reading, visual world eye-tracking, magnitude estimation and questionnaires. The course will be organized around several topics that have been central to syntactic research, such as anaphor resolution, ellipsis and quantifier scope in order to examine how experimental methods can complement existing work; for example, by shedding light on areas where stable judgments have traditionally been difficult to obtain, and by allowing us to investigate the time course of real-time language processing. By the end of this course students will be able to understand and critically evaluate research that uses various experimental methods, and be able to design and run their own experiments.

Prerequisites: LIN 110, LIN220 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Fall 2015

LIN 465 FORMAL SEMANTICS

This course is an in-depth introduction to the formal analysis of natural language meaning, employing techniques that have been developed in language and formal philosophy over the last century. Issues include intensionality, quantification, tense, presupposition, plurality, the analysis of discourse, and other current issues. Familiarity with syntax, logic, and/or computation are helpful.

Prerequisites: LIN110, LIN225 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR
Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 466 INTRODUCTION TO PRAGMATICS

Within theoretical linguistics, pragmatics is (broadly speaking) the study of how language users convey meaning. This course covers three general areas: (1) How meaning carried by linguistic elements (such as sentences) interacts with meaning that arises from inferences about speakers’ intentions; (2) Ways of characterizing meaning, especially with respect to linguistic elements not easily handled in traditional semantic (i.e., truth-conditional) terms; (3) The role of context in determining meaning. Topics to be discussed include the relation between semantics and pragmatics, representations of context, truth-conditional and other types of meaning, presupposition; implicature and Grice’s Cooperative Principle

Prerequisites: LIN 110, LIN 225
Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 468 COMPUTATIONAL SEMANTICS

This course is a hands-on exploration of recent advances in computational models of meaning. The first part of the course will focus on implementing traditional rule-based compositional semantics in the functional programming language Haskell. We will construct a sophisticated model of formal semantics, culminating in examining the use of monads to model types of natural language meaning phenomena. The second part of the course explores distributional semantic models and their implementation, where lexical meaning is defined in terms of lexical co-occurrence, estimating meaning from large-scale corpus resources.

Prerequisites: LIN110, LIN220 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 469 SIGN LANG PSYCHOLINGUISTICS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2010

LIN 470 TOOLS FOR LANGUAGE DOCUMENTATION

This is a hands-on class that introduces you to major techniques and tools in language documentation and description. You will learn how to collect and record a variety of language data through elicitation and text collection. The emphasis is then on organizing, managing, and processing these data sets for various purposes, such as building up a dictionary, annotating natural speech, and time-aligning media of different formats with computational tools such as Praat, Toolbox, and ELAN. Further, we will discuss crucial topics in language documentation such as fieldwork, ethics, and language revitalization.

Prerequisites: LIN110 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 471 FIELD METHODS IN LING DESC I

This class is similar to LIN389: Students will learn how to organize a fieldwork project by working with a native speaker. They will systematically prepare elicitation sessions, organize their data, and learn how to write up short sketches of their findings. The final project is a chapter of a joint sketch grammar of the language, including annotated natural text. In contrast to the senior seminar, however, this course is designed for two terms, continuing in the fall term. Also, participants are required to have taken LIN270/470 as a prerequisite. Having a background in language documentation and data processing techniques, students in this class will focus more on collecting and annotating natural texts (stories, dialogues, experimental data) which is adding a documentary angle.

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 491 MASTER'S READING IN LIN

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 495 MASTER'S RESEARCH IN LING

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 501 METHODS IN LINGUISTIC RESEARCH

An introduction to the field of linguistics and natural language emphasizing a theoretical perspective. Topics will cover subfields of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

LIN 510 TOPICS IN PHONETICS

No description

LIN 520 SYNTAX

This is a graduate class on syntactic theory, focusing mainly on modern transformational approaches (minimalism) to cross-linguistic language structure phenomena. In addition to reading original research leading up to the current state of the art, the course will focus on several case studies (such as pronoun/reflexive reference resolution and ellipsis phenomena) comparing transformational and non-transformational approaches.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

LIN 525 GRADUATE SEMANTICS

This course examines a current issue in semantic theory, within the context of a broader theoretical approach to how natural languages meanings are to be analyzed.

Last Offered: Spring 2012

LIN 527 TOPICS PHONETICS & PHONOLOGY

This seminar explores current topics in experimental phonetics and laboratory phonology. These may include speech production, speech perception and their interaction with the phonological grammar, prosody (tone, intonation), metrics and metrical phonology. Including discussion of different phonological theories such as Articulatory Phonology, Intonational Phonology, prosodic morphology, feature theory, segmental theories (vowel harmony systems), as well as user-based approaches to phonology.

Last Offered: Spring 2012

LIN 535 FORMAL PRAGMATICS

This seminar explores current topics in pragmatics and its interfaces with other areas including prosody, syntax, semantics. Topics may include implicature, presupposition, at-issueness, speech act theory, information structure, the dynamics of discourse, and the structure of discourse contexts. In addition to discussing recent and classical theoretical works, the seminar aims to incorporate data and theoretical insights from various perspectives including fieldwork on non-English languages, psycholinguistics, and corpus methodologies.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

LIN 581 MUSIC AND LANGUAGE

This course will explore relationships between musical and linguistic structure. In addition to reading and evaluating early writings on the subject by Bernstein and Lerdahl & Jackendoff, students will assess more recent work by Huron and Patel, and the linguists Hayes and Ladd on prosodic structure. We will also discuss experimental work on prosodic structure in language and on music acquisition in infants. Co-taught by a music theorist and linguist, the course will review basic aspects of phonology, intonational phonology, meter, and memory that are relevant to music. Each student will complete a piece of original research in the form of a term paper and class presentation. Permission of instructor required for non-Eastman students.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

LIN 590 SUPERVISED TEACHING

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 591 PHD READING COURSE IN LING

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 595 PHD RESEARCH IN LING

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 595A PHD RESEARCH IN ABSENTIA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 890 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE - MA

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2011

LIN 895 CONT OF MASTER'S ENROLLMENT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 897 MASTER'S DISSERTATION

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 899 MASTER'S DISSERTATION

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 985 LEAVE OF ABSENCE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 986V FULL TIME VISITING STUDENT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 990 SUMMER IN RESIDENCE

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2011

LIN 995 CONT OF DOCTORAL ENROLLMENT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 997 WRITING DISSERTATION

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 997A DOCT DISSERTATN IN ABSENTIA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 999 DOCTORAL DISSERTATION

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

LIN 999A DOCT DISSERTATN IN ABSENTIA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018