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PSCI 283 Contemporary Political Theory

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  • Fall 2013
    James Johnson
    Fall 2013 — TR 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    This course deals with the role of vision and representation in current political thought. This is a broad theme. To explore it we will read a variety of critics and theorists such as John Dewey, Hannah Arendt, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Michel Foucault, and Susan Sontag. We also will explore efforts in a broad range of visual media such as graphics and photography, to envision such matters as race and color, migrations and boundaries, material inequality, power and its manifestations, and so forth. By analyzing these resources, students will develop their skills, both oral and written, at formulating their own arguments on important political themes. The course is writing intensive. It is not open to first-year students. Pre-requisite: PSC 202 Argument in Political Science.

  • Spring 2011
    James Johnson
    Spring 2011 ("W" Required) — TR 11:05 - 12:20
    Course Syllabus

    This course deals with the role of vision and representation in current political thought. This is a broad theme. To explore it we will read a variety of critics and theorists such as John Dewey, Hannah Arendt, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Michel Foucault, and Susan Sontag. We also will explore efforts in a broad range of visual media such as graphics and photography, to envision such matters as race and color, migrations and boundaries, material inequality, power and its manifestations, and so forth. By analyzing these resources, students will develop their skills, both oral and written, at formulating their own arguments on important political themes. The course is writing intensive. It is not open to first-year students. Pre-requisite: PSC 202 Argument in Political Science.

  • Fall 2009
    James Johnson
    Fall 2009 ("W" Optional) — MW 12:30 - 13:45

    This course deals with the role of vision and representation in current political thought. This is a broad theme. To explore it we will read a variety of critics and theorists such as John Dewey, Michel Foucault, and Susan Sontag. We also will explore efforts in a broad range of visual media such as graphics and photography to envision such matters as race and color, migrations and boundaries, material inequality, and so forth. By analyzing these resources, students will develop their skills, both oral and written, at formulating their own arguments on important political themes.