Skip to main content

Course List

PSC 550 Comparative Politics Field Seminar

Display Tracks: New or Old
  • Spring 2018

    This course is the required field seminar for the comparative politics field of the Ph.D. program. Comparative politics is a field that attempts to develop and test theories that can be used to explain political events and patterns across and within political systems, especially nation-states outside the United States. The course is designed to introduce students to classic and contemporary works across a range of topic including: democracy, dictatorship and development; revolutions and violence; culture and social movements; parties and electoral systems; representation and accountability; institutions of governance and political economy. It will also introduce various methodological approaches and issues in the comparative field, including research design and case selection. The reading load is heavy and students are expected to make several presentations and lead discussion of readings, as well as to take two exams. Undergraduates may on enroll only with consent of the instructors.

  • Spring 2016

    This course provides general conceptual background and an introduction to some major works in the comparative field and subfields. Comparative politics is a field that attempts to develop and test theories that can be used to explain political events and patterns across and within political systems, especially nation-states. Topics include democracy, dictatorship and development; revolutions and violence; institutions and political economy; parties, elections and voting; representation and accountability; ethnicity; culture and social movements. It will also introduce various methodological approaches and issues in the comparative field, including research design and case selection. The reading load is heavy and students are expected to make several presentations and lead discussion of readings, as well as to take two exams. This course provides general conceptual background and an introduction to some major works in the comparative field and subfields. Comparative politics is a field that attempts to develop and test theories that can be used to explain political events and patterns across and within political systems, especially nation-states. Topics include democracy, dictatorship and development; revolutions and violence; institutions and political economy; parties, elections and voting; representation and accountability; ethnicity; culture and social movements. It will also introduce various methodological approaches and issues in the comparative field, including research design and case selection. The reading load is heavy and students are expected to make several presentations and lead discussion of readings, as well as to take two exams.

  • Spring 2014

    This course provides general conceptual background and an introduction to some major works in the comparative field and subfields. Comparative politics is a field that attempts to develop and test theories that can be used to explain political events and patterns across political systems, especially nation-states. Topics include political culture, development and democratization, political regimes, violence and revolution, elections, social movements, parties, coalitions, institutions, and comparative public policy. The works are discussed and compared both in terms of the major substantive arguments and the methodological approaches taken to enhance the credibility of the arguments. The reading load is heavy and students are expected to write a number of short papers, which are presented in class, as well a midterm and one longer analytic essay.

  • Fall 2011
    Gretchen Helmke, G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
    Fall 2011 — T 12:30 - 15:15

    This course provides general conceptual background and an introduction to some major works in the comparative field and subfields. Comparative politics is a field that attempts to develop and test theories that can be used to explain political events and patterns across political systems, especially nation-states. Topics include political culture, development and democratization, political regimes, violence and revolution, elections, social movements, parties, coalitions, institutions, and comparative public policy. The works are discussed and compared both in terms of the major substantive arguments and the methodological approaches taken to enhance the credibility of the arguments. The reading load is heavy and students are expected to write a number of short papers, which are presented in class, as well a midterm and one longer analytic essay.

  • Fall 2009

    This course provides general conceptual background and an introduction to some major works in the comparative field and subfields. Comparative politics is a field that attempts to develop and test theories that can be used to explain political events and patterns across political systems, especially nation-states. Topics include political culture, development and democratization, political regimes, violence and revolution, elections, social movements, parties, coalitions, institutions, and comparative public policy. The works are discussed and compared both in terms of the major substantive arguments and the methodological approaches taken to enhance the credibility of the arguments. The reading load is heavy and students are expected to write a number of short papers, which are presented in class, as well a midterm and one longer analytic essay.