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Course List

PSC 202W Argument in Political Science

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  • Fall 2019
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2019 ("W" Required) — MWF 10:25 - 11:15

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists and emphasizes careful reading and analytical writing. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Topics include tyranny of the majority, slavery, civic engagement, political parties, women's rights, racism, economic and political inequality, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought—the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address—as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. Note: In this academic year, PSC 202 will only be offered in the fall semester. It will NOT be offered in the spring.

  • Fall 2018
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2018 ("W" Required) — MWF 10:25 - 11:15
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists and emphasizes careful reading and analytical writing. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Topics include tyranny of the majority, slavery, civic engagement, political parties, women's rights, racism, economic and political inequality, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought—the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address—as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. Note: In this academic year, PSC 202 will only be offered in the fall semester. It will NOT be offered in the spring.

  • Fall 2017
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2017 ("W" Required) — MWF 10:25 - 11:15
    Course Syllabus

    Restriction: Not open to freshmen. Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists and emphasizes careful reading and analytical writing. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Topics include tyranny of the majority, slavery, civic engagement, political parties, women's rights, racism, economic and political inequality, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. Note: In this academic year, PSC 202 will only be offered in the fall semester. It will NOT be offered in the spring.

  • Fall 2016
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2016 — MWF 10:25 - 11:15
    Course Syllabus

    Restriction: Not open to freshmen. Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists and emphasizes careful reading and analytical writing. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Topics include tyranny of the majority, slavery, civic engagement, political parties, women's rights, racism, economic and political inequality, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. Note: In this academic year, PSC 202 will only be offered in the fall semester. It will NOT be offered in the spring.

  • Spring 2016
    Stuart Jordan
    Spring 2016 — MWF 9:00 - 9:50
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course examines the politics of regulation, law, and legal institutions. Specifically, we look at a series of arguments regarding the role political institutions play in the resolution of conflicts over limited resources. The arguments we examine come from a range of traditions--including political philosophy, positive political theory, and political history. Finally, although we examine a number of applications to American politics, most of what we read regards conflicts over resources in general, not just those that occur within the United States.

  • Fall 2014
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2014 — MWF 11:50 - 12:40
    Course Syllabus

    Restriction: Not open to freshmen. Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Issues include tyranny of the majority, slavery, individual rights, civic engagement, parties and interest groups, international diplomacy, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. Note: In this academic year, PSC 202 will only be offered in the fall semester. It will NOT be offered in the spring.

  • Spring 2014
    Stuart Jordan
    Spring 2014 — TR 14:00 - 15:15
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course examines the politics of regulation, law, and legal institutions. Specifically, we look at a series of arguments regarding the role political institutions play in the resolution of conflicts over limited resources. The arguments we examine come from a range of traditions--including political philosophy, positive political theory, and political history. Finally, although we examine a number of applications to American politics, most of what we read regards conflicts over resources in general, not just those that occur within the United States.

  • Spring 2013
    Stuart Jordan
    Spring 2013 — TR 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course examines the politics of regulation, law, and legal institutions. Specifically, we look at a series of arguments regarding the role political institutions play in the resolution of conflicts over limited resources. The arguments we examine come from a range of traditions--including political philosophy, positive political theory, and political history. Finally, although we examine a number of applications to American politics, most of what we read regards conflicts over resources in general, not just those that occur within the United States.

  • Fall 2012
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2012 — MWF 11:00 - 11:50
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Issues include tyranny of the majority, slavery, individual rights, civic engagement, parties and interest groups, international diplomacy, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists.

  • Fall 2011
    Stuart Jordan
    Fall 2011 — MW 14:00 - 15:15
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course examines the politics of regulation, law, and legal institutions. Specifically, we look at a series of arguments regarding the role political institutions play in the resolution of conflicts over limited resources. The arguments we examine come from a range of traditions--including political philosophy, positive political theory, and political history. Finally, although we examine a number of applications to American politics, most of what we read regards conflicts over resources in general, not just those that occur within the United States. In 2011-2012, PSC 202 will be offered only in the fall semester. If you need the course and must take it this academic year, your only option is the fall offering.

  • Fall 2010
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2010 — MWF 11:00 - 11:50
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Issues include tyranny of the majority, slavery, individual rights, civic engagement, parties and interest groups, international diplomacy, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, \"The Federalist,\" Tocqueville\'s \"Democracy in America,\" the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists. This course will NOT be offered in Spring 2011. If you need the course in 2010-2011, you should plan to take the course in the fall semester.

  • Spring 2010
    Stuart Jordan
    Spring 2010 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to junior and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists.

  • Fall 2009
    Gerald Gamm
    Fall 2009 — MWF 11:00 - 11:50
    Course Syllabus

    Students generally take PSC 202 in their sophomore year, but the course is also open to juniors and seniors. The course introduces students to the questions, concepts, and analytical approaches of political scientists. This version of the course focuses on the tension between majority rule and minority rights in the American political tradition. Issues include tyranny of the majority, slavery, individual rights, civic engagement, parties and interest groups, international diplomacy, legislative organization, and representation. Readings are drawn from classic texts in American thought--the Declaration of Independence, "The Federalist," Tocqueville's "Democracy in America," the Gettysburg Address--as well as from books and articles written by contemporary political scientists.