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PSCI 280 Political Accountability

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  • Fall 2012
    Stuart Jordan
    Fall 2012 ("W" Required) — W 14:00 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    This class surveys positive theories of political accountability - theories of the mechanisms that cause governments to act (or prevent them from acting) in the interests of their citizens. In the first few weeks students are trained to analyze basic principal-agent models. These models were initially developed in economics, and are now widely used in the studies of political accountability. The rest of the course is divided into two units - theories of political accountability in representative democracies, and theories of political accountability in autocracies. In addition to basic positive models, both units examine empirical studies of accountability, and problems of "reform" - i.e. the possibility of designing institutions that would improve accountability.

  • Spring 2012
    Stuart Jordan
    Spring 2012 ("W" Required) — W 14:00 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    This class surveys positive theories of political accountability - theories of the mechanisms that cause governments to act (or prevent them from acting) in the interests of their citizens. In the first few weeks students are trained to analyze basic principal-agent models. These models were initially developed in economics, and are now widely used in the studies of political accountability. The rest of the course is divided into two units - theories of political accountability in representative democracies, and theories of political accountability in autocracies. In addition to basic positive models, both units examine empirical studies of accountability, and problems of "reform" - i.e. the possibility of designing institutions that would improve accountability.

  • Fall 2008

    This class surveys positive theories of political accountability - theories of the mechanisms that cause governments to act (or prevent them from acting) in the interests of their citizens. In the first few weeks students are trained to analyze basic principal-agent models. These models were initially developed in economics, and are now widely used in the studies of political accountability. The rest of the course is divided into two units - theories of political accountability in representative democracies, and theories of political accountability in autocracies. In addition to basic positive models, both units examine empirical studies of accountability, and problems of "reform" - i.e. the possibility of designing institutions that would improve accountability.