Skip to main content

Undergraduate Program

Courses

Courses currently being offered:

Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.


Below you will find a list of all undergraduate courses that have been offered.

NOTE: Not all of these courses are offered in any given year.

AAS 100 AFRO FUTURE FEMALES

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

AAS 103 GATEWAY: APARTHEID S AFRICA

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

AAS 104 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES & ANTHROPOLOGY

This course explores the complex inter-relation of race, class and gender in contemporary America, both in people's subjective identities in their objective life chances. The materials assigned include first-person narratives of particular life experiences; quantitative analyses of general statistical patterns; and long-term historical explanations of these experiences and patterns.

Last Offered: Summer 2016

AAS 106 COLONIAL & CONTEMPORARY AFRICA

This course uses film, literature, and historical studies to understand the transformation of African societies during the colonial era and its neocolonial aftermath. It maps out the forging of new national identities, creation of wage laborers, restructuring of rural communities, and changing power relations between women and men, the young and old. Students will also explore how African men and women, from their homes and workplaces, and as part of nationalist and national liberation movements during and after the Cold War, have sought to redefine their place in the global economy amidst new opportunities and challenges presented by environmental degradation, the HIV/AIDS pandemic, hunger, international debt, and Chinas growing thirst for the continents seemingly inexhaustible natural resources.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 107 HISTORY OF ISLAM

The development of Islam from its origins in the Qur'an and Muhammad's teachings, through the codification of the classical tradition in its various forms, and finally to the living Islam of the contemporary world.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

AAS 110 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

This course will serve as an introduction to the dominant methodologies and paradigms that constitute the field of African-American Studies. We will read a wide variety of texts across disciplines, including but not limited to: anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, musicology, legal studies, literary studies, and visual studies. Central questions for us throughout the semester will be: What are some of the primary strategies for analyzing and imagining the Black experience in the U.S. and internationally? How is "Blackness" as a social category constituted and represented? What does the future hold for the field of African-American Studies? In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop and pursue their own lines of research.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

AAS 121 WORLD MUSIC IN CONTEXT

Engaging an extraordinary diversity of sound, this course explores some of the world's major traditions of musical performance, including classical, ritual, and ceremonial music from around the globe. Through weekly reading and listening assignments, we will study musical sound structures within a variety of social, political, and religious contexts, investigating relationships between music, people, and place. In addition to well-known modes of music making, we will look at many fascinating but less familiar forms of musical expression, such as aboriginal pop music from Australia, the throat-singing traditions of Tuva and Mongolia, and the freedom songs of South Africa. The course will culminate in a semester-long final project.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 122 HISTORY OF JAZZ

This study of Jazz, as an American musical art form, will be structured around the lives and music of jazz musicians, across a range of instrumental, vocal, and ensemble genres. Course focuses on jazz titans, those individuals and musical groups distinguished by their seminal and permanent influences, such as Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, or Coleman Hawkins or shorter intense careers, such as Charlie Parker. Blues, ragtime, swing, bebop, cool, progressive, and free jazz are landmark terms. And finally, study of the musical history will be enhanced by considerations from sociological, linguistic, and philosophical perspectives. The instructional format includes lectures, discussion and intense emphasis on listening. This course is designed for students with little or no musical training; simple technical, musical vocabulary and concepts will be provided. Reading, listening assignments, brief written assignments and two exams. No prerequisites. (Fall Only)

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 122B HISTORY OF JAZZ II

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

AAS 123 MUSIC OF BLACK AMERICANS

The course will study the Black American Christian musical beginnings and includes forms of worship, early musical practices, the Spiritual, evolution of Gospel. An examination of ante-bellum musical activities follows including secular song types, character of the folk music with respect to poetic and musical form, language and themes. Attention will be given to significant literary and aesthetic developments, especially during the Harlem Renaissance and the poetry of several writers of that era will be surveyed. The course will treat Blues, its origins evolution through the 1940s. Surveys of classical music forms from the 18th to mid-20th century; music of the theater from minstrelsy to Broadway; precursors of jazz, the syncopated dance orchestra and brass bands; early jazz to bebop round out the course offerings.

Last Offered: Spring 2012

AAS 125 REL,RACE,ETHNICTY IN AMERICA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 139 AFRICAN-AMERICAN MIGRATION: 20TH CENTURY

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2010

AAS 141 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY I

After examining the primary features of pre-European African society we will assess the disruptions triggered by European arrival. A discussion of the "Middle Passage" -- the transportation of enslaved Africans to North America -- and the Africans' adjustment to their new environment will compose the first section of the course. We will then focus on the process of "Americanization" as the Africans became African-Americans. The struggle for freedom and citizenship will conclude our survey. The course readings will be selected from autobiographies by African and African-American authors, and some brief selections from secondary texts. Using the autobiographies as historical source material, we will examine the values and cultural practices of Africans in America, and the ways in which African-Americans adapted to and shaped American life and culture.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 142 AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY II

This course surveys African-American literature of a variety of genres—poetry, drama, autobiography, fiction, and non-fiction essays—from the 18th Century to the 20th. The course interprets this tradition not only as the production of American writers of African descent, but also as a set works that display formal characteristics associated with black cultural traditions. Discussion topics include the meanings of race, the construction of black identity, and intra-racial differences of class, gender, and sexuality. Special attention will be paid to approaching literary texts from a variety of critical perspectives.

Last Offered: Summer 2010

AAS 151 THE BLUES

The course covers the history and influence of the music called "the Blues"; the origins of blues in the context of African American culture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the blues' rapid rise to becoming the dominant popular music in the African American community, and the discovery of blues by white audiences. Class format combines lecture, listening and discussion.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 156 INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE

This course surveys African-American literature of a variety of genres-poetry, drama, autobiography, fiction, and non-fiction essays-from the 18th Century to the 20th. The course interprets this tradition not only as the production of American writers of African descent, but also as a set works that display formal characteristics associated with black cultural traditions. Discussion topics include the meanings of race, the construction of black identity, and intra-racial differences of class, gender, and sexuality. Special attention will be paid to approaching literary texts from a variety of critical perspectives.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 157 AFRICAN RELIGIONS OF THE DIASPORA

A study of the Interfaith Movement from the late 19th to the early 21st century, including issues of identity, religious conflict, and women's voices.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

AAS 158 GOSPEL CHOIR

One rehearsal per week. Two concerts per semester. In addition, there may be off-campus performances in local colleges, churches, and other venues in the greater-Rochester community. The Gospel Choir performs a varied repertoire of sacred music -- spirituals, hymns, traditional and contemporary Gospel, music of the praise-and-worship genre. Students may register for credit or simply sing as choir participants. (Fall and Spring) (1 credit)

Last Offered: Fall 2013

AAS 162 MODERN AFRICAN-AMERICAN ENG

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 165 INTRODUCTORY MBIRA ENSEMBLE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 168 WEST AFRICAN DRUMMING BEG

In this course, students will work on expanding their repertory of rhythms from Guinea, West Africa, and on improving their playing technique on the djembe, dunun, sangban, and kenkeni. In particular, we will concentrate on learning extended solo sequences for the djembe, and more advanced arrangements played on the dunun, sangban, and kenkeni. Students will also work on developing skills specific to performance, adding choreographed onstage movement to complement their drumming. Pre-requisite: At least one semester of previous enrollment in the Intro West African Percussion Ensemble.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 170 RELIGION & HIP HOP CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 182 WEST AFRICAN DANCE FORMS 1A

A continuation of Dance 181 that allows the student to deepen their experience and hone their skills in West African Dance.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 183 INCARCERATION NATION

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 185 AFRICAN AMER RELIGIOUS HIST

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 194 ROCHESTER POLITICS & PLACES

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2013

AAS 194Q ROCHESTER POLITICS & PLACES

No description

AAS 202 NEW PERSPECTIVES GLOBAL HIST

The concept of a Third World. The origins of colonialism and "underdevelopment" in the rise of European capitalism. The struggles of the colonial and postcolonial peoples for political independence, cultural autonomy, and economic development.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 203 GIFTING,VIOLN&INDEBTEDBOD

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

AAS 204 EARLY CIVILIZATION AFRICA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 205 ANTHROPOLOGY OF "ROBOTS"

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 208 SHERLOCK:RACE, GEND, CRIME

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 210 NGOMA:DRUM-DANCE&RIT S AFR

American Culture? Is there such a thing? This class will explore, discuss and debate this question and some more: If there is an American culture, how can we tackle it? How does anthropology, famous for its research away from home, help us understand current major debates in the United States? How do outsiders understand and evaluate American culture? Is there a return of religion to American public life? How do Americans address power relations, class, gender, ethnicity and race? To tackle these questions we will use assigned readings, films, and current events seen through print and electronic media.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 213 POLITICS OF NATURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 218 UNEQUALDEVSTATE POL BRAUSNIG

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 220 RACE & GENDER IN POPULAR FILM

This course explores Hollywood's current fascination with race and gender as social issues and spectacles. In particular, we will focus on the ways that social difference have become the sites of increasingly conflicted narrative and visual interactions in our films. To examine competing representations of racial difference and sexual difference in contemporary US culture, we analyze popular films of the 1980s and 1990s, from thrillers to action films to comedies.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

AAS 221 BIRTH & DEATH I: VITAL EVENTS IN OUR PERSONAL LIVES

How do human beings experience, make sense of, cope with and shape birth illness, and death in their own lives and in the lives of those who are close to them? Historical and contemporary examples from North America, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

AAS 222 MUS ETHNOGRAPHY & HIV

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

AAS 223 THE SOUTH AND THE WORLD

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 224 AFRICAN-AMERICAN POLITICS

This course will examine the relationship between African Americans and the American political system in order to provide students with a broader perspective on the American political process. We will address issues of organizational resources and approaches, political leadership, representation, integrationist and separatist ideologies, and various strategies for African-American political empowerment.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

AAS 225 RACE & POLTCL REPRESENTATION

Introduces students to the concepts, theories, and methodological approaches that political scientists use to examine the intersection of racial politics and political representation in the American political context.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

AAS 225W RACE & POLTCL REPRESENTATION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

AAS 226 BLACK PARIS

This course is a study of Black Paris, as imagined by three generations of Black cultural producers from the United States, the Caribbean and Africa. Paris is as a space of freedom and artistic glory that African American writers, solders and artists were denied back home. For colonized Africans, and Caribbeans, Paris was the birthace of the Negritude, the ultimate cultural renaissance influenced by the Harlem Renaissance. From Josephine Baker, Richard Wright, James Baldwin to Shay Youngblood's Black girl in Paris, from Aime Cesaire to Maryse Conde, from Bernard Dadie's An African in Paris and to contemporary Franco-African writing, we will investigate how the representation of Paris functions in the construction of a black identities. Readings include: Black Girl in Paris (Shay Youngblood), Desirada (Maryse Conde), The Josephine Baker Story. Paris Noir: African Americans in the City of Light (Tyler Stovall), An Aftrican in Paris.(Bernard Dadie).

Last Offered: Spring 2013

AAS 227 AFRCN-AMER LIT & THE ARCHIVE

Is President Barack Obama a black leader or a leader who happens to be black? Leads to understanding where the nation's first African-American president fits in a long stream of black political thinkers, activists, and leaders.


Last Offered: Fall 2010

AAS 227W BLACK POLITICAL LEADERSHIP

Is President Barack Obama a black leader or a leader who happens to be black? Leads to understanding where the nation's first African-American president fits in a long stream of black political thinkers, activists, and leaders.



Last Offered: Fall 2010

AAS 228 THE POLITICS OF SPORT

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

AAS 229 Pause: The Politics of Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Hip Hop

This course examines the complex and dynamic relationship between race, gender, and sexuality in hip hop. The goals: 1) To introduce students to emergent scholarship in the interrelated fields of critical race theory, feminist and gender studies, and queer theory; and 2) To not only use these theoretical rubrics to analyze hip hop, but to also use hip hop as a heterogeneous and constantly shifting cultural and political formation that informs, complicates, and offers new of imaginings of these fields of study. We will look at hip hop figures like Jay Z and Nicki Minaj, subgenres like “sissy bounce” and “gangsta rap,” activist ideologies like “hip hop feminism,” and socio-political issues like mass incarceration and HIV/AIDS in Black communities in order to trace how the historical and contemporary social organizations of sexuality, gender, and race are mutually negotiated, contested, and constructed within hip hop music, film, dance, dress, and other sites of cultural performance.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 230 SLAVE NARRATIVES & NEO SLAVE NARRATIVES

Autobiography is the foundational genre in the tradition of African-American literature. It is also the genre that both illustrates and represents the process of the construction of identity. Autobiography is not only writing about a life authored by oneself, but also the life of the self made manifest in the form of writing. This course surveys the tradition of autobiographical writings by African Americans, from slave narratives to recent bestsellers, in order to promote an understanding of autobiography as a narrative form shaped by its historical context and the purposes of the author. In addition, the course provides students with insights into various topics in African-American culture and history. Readings include texts by Maya Angelou, Frederick Douglass, Olaudah Equiano, Zora Neale Hurston, Harriet Jacobs, Audre Lorde, Barack Obama, Booker T. Washington, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and more.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 231 AFRICAN-AMERICAN DRAMA

Study of dramatic works by African-American playwrights during the twentieth and twenty-first century.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

AAS 232 WAR, GENOCIDE & JUSTICE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2015

AAS 233 (IL)LEGAL ANTHROPOLOGY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

AAS 234 PHONO-GRAPHY/MUSIC & AA LIT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 235 THE BLACK BODY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 236 AFRICAN ART TODAY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 237 REPRESENTING AFR-AMERICANS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

AAS 238 PRIVATE ACTS/PUBLIC BODIES

No description

AAS 239 SPIRITUALISM IN AMERICA

The primary aim of this course is to explore the historical development and structural make-up of modern American Spiritualism. This course offers students a historical narrative that ranges from the early development of modern Spiritualism in upstate New York to current forms, such as African American Spiritual churches of New Orleans. In addition to this historical survey, the course examines major principles making up the framework of modern Spiritualism in America. Class format includes lectures, discussions, films, and field trips.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 240 CORRUPTION GLOBAL ECONOMY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 241 MAJOR AUTHOR: TONI MORRISON

Toni Morrison has emerged as one of the most influential writers and critics in contemporary American culture. This course will approach her work from a broad range of critical perspectives including black feminist thought, psychoanalysis, trauma theory, Biblical exegesis, postcolonial analysis, and critical race theory. Although this class will emphasize rigorous study of her literary work, we will also pay close attention to her contributions to literary criticism, her role in public life as well as her forays into political and national debates. In our study of her novels, we will explore such issues as the importance of history and myth in the creation of personal identity, constructions of race and gender, the dynamic nature of love, the role of the community in social life, and the pressures related to the development of adolescent girls.

Last Offered: Fall 2013

AAS 242 URBAN CHANGE&URBAN POLITICS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 242W URBAN CHANGE&URBAN POLITICS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 243 MUHAMMAD & THE QUR'AN

This course is a study of the prophet Muhammad, the Qur'an, and their importance to medieval and modern Muslim culture. The prophet's life and major themes of the Qur'an are discussed together with interpretations of them found in Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical writings.

AAS 243W MUHAMMAD & THE QUR'AN

This course is a study of the prophet Muhammad, the Qur’an, and their importance to medieval and modern Muslim culture. The prophet’s life and major themes of the Qur’an are discussed together with interpretations of them found in Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical writings.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 244 MUTILATED BODIES, MUTILATED DISCOURSE

'Transnational sisterhood' or cultural imperialism? Legitimate ritualized practice or outdated violent ritual? Genital cutting, female circumcision, female genital surgery? The controversy over this practice already begins with the act of its naming. If there seems to be a consensus about the physical violence imposed on the female body, why is it that western feminist discourse is suspected of perpetuating the mutilation African voices? This course seeks to provide an understanding of the context in which a fragmented 'transnational sisterhood' allows for a proliferation of mutilated discourses on mutilated postcolonial bodies. Readings and Films include Alice Walker (Warrior Marks), Florence Ayissi Fauziya Kassindja (Do They Hear You When You Cry), Maryse Conde and more critical and theoretical readings from African, French and North American authors. In English.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 245 LIT AND MOD ENVIRON IMAGIN

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 246 CRY FREEDOM

Since the 1960's certain Christian theologians have attempted to re-think and re-express their religious beliefs in ways that can lead to the radical transformation of people's lives and social institutions. The movement this group of diverse Christian thinkers has set in motion is often referred to as liberation theology. In this course we will look at the principal ideas of various liberation theologians -- Latin American, Asian, African, Afro-American, and feminist. As well as looking at the ideas of these thinkers, we will also examine the social worlds in which they think and write, thus trying to see the connection between their ideas and the social environments they want to liberate.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 247 BLACK PARIS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

AAS 248 MARRIAGE, FAMILY & COMMON GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

What is the impact of a new global economy on families, love and marriage in the United States and in other countries? Are there new forms of transnational marriage, love, families? Are families still seen as enduring/reassuring 'building blocks' of their respective societies? How does global labor migration of women and men affect families they leave behind? Does women's migration change local understandings of gender roles, families and communities? In this new global context how do people view attachment to 'place'?

Last Offered: Spring 2012

AAS 249 THE CIVIL WAR

The course suggests that there existed two distinct views as to how the new nation would be structured. Once these views clashed and became sectional, the nation was thrown into a political, theological, and, ultimately, a military contest the demands of which led to the incorporation of structural changes that had the effect of resolving the very issues that had propelled the nation into war. As we identify and discuss the causes, conduct, and consequences of the Civil War, we will examine the changing ideas about nation, government, work, race, and gender, and ask: How different were Northern and Southern institutions and, to what extent were northern and southern Americans fundamentally different people?

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 250 FOOD, JUSTICE, URBAN FARMING

This course provides a basic introduction to some of the major works and themes in American literature, focusing primarily on the development of the novel and short story, with limited attention to poetry and drama. We will begin in the nineteenth century and work our way through such contemporary writers as Toni Morrison and Tony Kushner. Our focus will be on the creation of a national identity and how issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality intersect in the formation of an American literary tradition. Students will trace a number of important themes such as the relationship between politics and art, the impact of slavery and the Civil War, immigration, the American dream and the development of a national mythology and ideology. In our study of various movements in the American literary tradition, we will also pay close attention to the intellectual debates concerning audience, language, and the purpose of art that have shaped key texts and historical time periods.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 251 AFRICAN DIASPORA IN LAT AMER

This course introduces students to the emergent field of U.S. Latino/Latina writing and culture. Does the rich diversity of Latino communities in the United States—stretching from Los Angeles and the southwest to Miami and New York via Texas, Chicago, Minneapolis, and all stops in-between—frustrate or cancel any attempt to group their experiences under a single ethnic-racial term like “Latino/a”? What exactly is “the browning of the Midwest”? To what kind of gender, sexual, and racial codes are the inhabitants of these communities subjected? How do Latino/a narratives map the conflicted terrains of “utopias without borders,” free-trade zones, diasporas, nomadic workforces, and even the Internet? Latinos, Latin Americans, immigrants, exiles, refugees, border peoples, rafters—it is increasingly as difficult to define the legal status of individuals and communities as it is to talk about social, economic, and cultural identities.

Last Offered: Fall 2015

AAS 252 ECONOMIES & SOCIETIES IN LATIN AMERICA

Provides an historical explanation for the general problem of material poverty and the attendant sociopolitical crises that characterize contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 253 ECONOMICS & SOCIAL CONDITIONS OF AFRICAN-AMERICANS

Economic development of African Americans during the twentieth century, with an examination of the economics of discrimination. Same as HIS 253 and AAS 253.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 254 WEST AFRICAN DANCE FORMS I

Students will experience dancing African styles from the traditional cultures of Ghana and Guinea, West Africa. Technical emphasis will focus on foot patterns and placement, as well as developing the proper physical stance for African dance styles. Students will practice the dances and drum songs called Kpanlogo & Gota from Ghana, and Yankadi, Makru, & Kuku from Guinea, as well as various other selections. Outside work is required, including performance attendance, video viewing, article analysis, and journaling. Students can expect to gain a broadened perspective on contemporary West Africa and its cultural practices.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 255 WEST AFRICAN DANCE FORMS II

This course will focus on the increasingly complex dance repertoires of Ghana and Guinea, West Africa. A more specified investigation of regional context and cultural function of the dances will be emphasized. Repertoire dances include Sinte, Kassa, Yamama, & Somuninku from Guinea and Adowa, Slow Agbekor, & Gahu from Ghana, as well as others. Enrollment requires West African Dance 1 or demonstrated ability in African dance.

Prerequisites: DAN 181 or demonstrated ability in African dance.
Last Offered: Spring 2010

AAS 256 HIS OF RACE IN AMERICA

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 257 LINCOLN, DOUGLASS & BLACK FREEDOM

In what was probably the world’s greatest century, marked by several national and international struggles for human freedom, two men stand head and shoulders above the many great men and women who participated in a civil war for American freedom: Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. At first glance, these two men had little in common; one born free on the American frontier, the other unfree in the heartland of slavery. Yet they had much in common; both largely self-educated, they both attained a mastery for words and the ability to communicate simply and directly with their fellow man. As if born to fight in one major battle for human freedom, these two men traveled diverse roads to meet on a momentous battlefield: black freedom and the future of America. Utilizing a wide range of sometimes opposing tactics, each in his own way shaped nineteenth-century Americans’ understanding of what it meant to be free and a citizen.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 258 WEST AFRICAN DANCE:CONTEXT

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2012

AAS 259 AFRICAN-AMERICAN WOMEN'S HISTORY

This course will explore the history of African-American women from the 17th century to the present. African-American women developed a variety of responses to different economic, social, and political conditions in American society that depended on factors such as: the region they lived in, age, marital status, religious allegiances, class position, and political persuasions. Despite this diversity of experiences and identities African-American women continually contested the negative stereotypes presented in the dominant culture through political activism, social reform, and the sustaining of strong communities and families. In this class we shall explore the individual and collective actions of African-American women. We will focus on their personal stories, whether told through slave narrative, biographies, fiction or autobiography. By placing these individuals within their historical context we will gain a greater understanding of African-American women's lives, and American history more generally.

Last Offered: Fall 2010

AAS 260 NIGERIA SINCE ISLAM REV 1804

In the context of the global economy, Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, is blessed with vast mineral resources and agricultural lands able to produce a wide variety of tropical products and foods. The country's large population is made up of talented and highly resourceful individuals, who are quick to respond to economic incentives. Thus, it is hard to understand why the country has one of the lowest per capita incomes in the world and why the country's economy occupies such a lowly position within the global economy. We focus on the historical development of socio-economic/political structures over time to explain why the giant of Africa continues to slumber. Some of the country's central problems, such as ethnic and religious contradictions, are similar in some way to those in the U.S. The solutions attempted by the governments of both countries, such as affirmative action, are also somewhat similar. We will conduct a comparative analysis of contemporary historical issues in the two countries.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 261 TRUTH & POWER

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 262 AFRICAN-AMERICAN ART

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 263 ARCHAEOLOGY AFRICAN DIASPORA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 265 History of the African Diaspora in Latin America

This course examines the historical experiences of Africans and their descendants in Latin America and the Caribbean. The guiding questions of this course are: What is the African diaspora? What is the utility of such a framework for writing the histories of African descended peoples living in Latin America? What do the experiences of Afro-Latin Americans living in the region reveal about the grand narrative of Latin American history? While the course will begin with the era of colonial slavery, most of our attention will focus on the histories of Afro-Latin Americans after emancipation. Topic we will explore include: the particularities of slavery and emancipation in the Americas, gender and the formation of African-descended communities, the role of race and Afro-Latin American peoples in processes of nation formation, and the transnational dimensions of African diaspora history. (cross listed with HIS 248)

Last Offered: Spring 2015

AAS 267 FRENCH IN FILM

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 270 AFRICAN-AMERICAN VIS CULTURE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 271 CONTMPRY AFRICAN POLITICS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

AAS 272 HARLEM RENAISSANCE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 273 ETHNOARCHAEOLOGY OF AFRICA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 274 GUNS, WAR & REVOLUTION IN SOUTHERN AFRICA

This course explores the conditions that created the guerrilla movements, the way the rebels and government forces clashed in the air, cities, and jungles, and how the struggles reshaped the history of the region and its position in the global economy before and after the Cold War.

Last Offered: Spring 2012

AAS 277 ENERGY RESOURCES&UTILIZATION

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2010

AAS 278 BIRTH & DEATH II: MAKING POPULATIONS HEALTHY

This course examines programs carried out by governments, multilateral organizations, and non governmental organizations to deal with "public problems" connected to population: communicable diseases such as TB, malaria and HIV/AIDS; famine prevention and relief; child survival, especially malnutrition and infant diarrheal disease; safe motherhood; teen pregnancy; contraception, and abortion.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

AAS 280 GUINEA'S CULTURAL REVOLUTION

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015

AAS 281 STATE ROLE GLOBAL PERSP

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 282 AFRICAN-AMERICAN ART

No description

AAS 283 SOUTH AFRICA SINCE 1652

After a three-week introduction, the course explores South Africa's history from 1652 to the end of legal apartheid in 1994. The course focuses on broad themes regarding the birth and hardening of racial attitudes, land dispossession, industrial color bar, and urban segregation. It highlights African resistance in such forms as African independent church movements, political organizations, trade unionism, and the activism of black women and the youth. Finally, students will have the opportunity to examine major challenges facing the new South Africa, particularly poverty and the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

AAS 284 AFRICAN DANCE: WOMEN & CULTURE

This course will focus on dances that pertain to the life-cycle of women. Students will experience dances that celebrate rites of passage such as coming of age, circumcision, marriage, and childbirth. Discussion will center around gender roles in the performance ensemble and the correlation of performance representations with the traditional lifestyle. Students will examine the cultural factors that contribute to the articulation of gender roles in post-colonial West Africa and the relationship of those roles to the performance ensemble. This course will be cross-listed with Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies and Women’s Studies for the Spring 2011 semester.

Last Offered: Spring 2011

AAS 286 ISLAM AND THE THIRD WORLD

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 287 SOC CONST OF WHITENESS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 288 HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH: 1896-1945

Blue States! Red States! Why so many "Red States" in the South? Why such close attachment to family, religion, and community? Why such a penchant for a distinct music, food, and sports culture? Why has the region been for so long associated with social backwardness—violence, racism, and political conservatism? These and other characteristics (real or imagined) have roots that extend back to Europe and Africa while many are the result of more recent events dating back only a few generations. This course will address these and other questions in the search of historical answers to the roots of southern peculiarities and the origins of those "Red States."

Last Offered: Spring 2015

AAS 290 CRIME AND CULTURE

This course interrogates how the socially constructed category gender (merged with the socially constructed categories race and class) are implicated in the alleged school-to-prison pipeline. The chosen texts explore and analyze this connection with specific reference to prison "...as the new form of slavery." Using a plethora of academic/popular media and texts, including ethnography, videos, memoir, autobiographical data, literature and legal and non legal documents coupled with personal narratives, the course seeks to fortify student participants with the skills and anthropological insights needed to complete an ethnographic study of a prison or a prison-like structure in order to answer the overarching question: If gender is socially constructed, what happens when it goes to jail?

Last Offered: Spring 2011

AAS 291 CARIBBEAN NOVEL & THEORY

This course is a study of major Caribbean novels and major theoretical texts. The reading will be structured around the notion of ¿Antillanite¿ or Creolization elaborated by Martinican Edouard Glissant and his heirs Chamoiseau and Confiant of the ¿Creolite¿ movement. The controversial presence of the Other (Africa and France) in the Caribbean, the need to build a Caribbean authenticity in order to participate freely in what Glisant Glissant terms ¿Relation planetaire¿ (Planetary Relations) will also be thoroughly examined.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

AAS 297 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LIFE & CULTURE

This course identifies and discusses a selection of texts considered crucial for the understanding of the black experience from 1610 to the present.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

AAS 299G DIGITAL ARCHAEOLOGY AFRICA

No description

Last Offered: Summer 2017

AAS 302 ARCHAEOLOGY OF AFRICA

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 310 AFRCN-AMER LIT & THE ARCHIVE

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

AAS 335 POLITICAL ECONOMICS OF FOOD IN AFRICA

A three-part exploration of the idea that in the world of African peasants food does not have an independent life apart from the social relations of those who eat it. Part I traces the social biography of food as it moves from the field to the table; Part II seeks to understand whether and to what extent the daily and seasonal processes of Part I acquired new meanings and long-term historical trajectories as a result of Africa's engagement with the global economy, and Part III recasts the issues raised in Parts I and II into a debate between peasant intellectuals and professional historians.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

AAS 346 SOUTH AFRICA SINCE 1910

No description

AAS 352 HARLEM RENAISSANCE

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

AAS 356 BLACK FAMILY IN SLAVERY & FREEDOM

After a discussion of the Moynihan Report controversy and an assessment of the literature on the black family, the readings will investigate why and how stable black families were encouraged, and how they developed under slavery. The impact of factors such as economics, politics, religion, gender, medicine, and the proximity of free families, on the structure of the black family will be given special attention. In this way, the structure of the slave family on the eve of Emancipation, and its preparedness for freedom, will be tested and assessed. Students will be encouraged to identify persistent links between the "history" of slavery and the black family, and the development of social policy.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

AAS 361 SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN THE ATLANTIC WORLD: 1450-1913

Is a study in Atlantic World history beginning with a comparative examination of the economic, cultural, and political conditions in the major regions of the Atlantic in the mid-15th century. It proceeds systematically to analyze the expansive economic activities which followed the Portuguese and Spanish explorations and the colonization of the Americas. These activities had far-reaching economic, political, and cultural consequences in all regions of the Atlantic, with the emergence of an integrated Atlantic economy in the 19th century as the climax point. We focus centrally on the scholarly debates concerning the differential paths of development followed by the regions and countries of the Atlantic basin and the cultural mixtures (African, European, Americas) which evolved and conclude with a general discussion of the significance of these developments in the Atlantic World for the evolving global system. Student performance is evaluated on the basis of literature reviews and a term paper.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

AAS 371 EVOLVING WORLD ECONOMIC ORDER SINCE 16TH CENTURY

Seminar course. Course deals with the economic relations between the developed and less developed parts of the world since the sixteenth century.

AAS 371W EVOLVING WORLD ECONOMIC ORDER SINCE 16TH CENTURY

Seminar course. Course deals with the economic relations between the developed and less developed parts of the world since the sixteenth century.

AAS 375W ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE & AFRICA

Seminar course. Examines the level of socioeconomic development in Africa by the late fifteenth century, relative to the other major regions of the world at the time. The effects of the “production” of captives for export on social and political structures, and the overall economic consequences of the trade in Africa are also examined.

Last Offered: Fall 2012

AAS 380 SENIOR SEMINAR

Students will draw upon their exposure to the theory methods of AAS to produce an interdisciplinary research paper on a topic of their own choosing. Open only to senior majors. Permission of Department required.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 382 SLAVERY&20THC AFRCN-AM NOVEL

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

AAS 390 SUPERVISED TEACHING

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent studies on some aspect of the problems of energy resource development in lower-income countries, solutions to it, and relationship to development issues, including work with the instructor’s Access to Hydrocarbon Energy for African Development project, can be done within this course.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 391W INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

AAS 393 SENIOR PROJECT

May be an independent course with a faculty sponsor or may be taken in an advanced research seminar in which the student elects to write the essay but not to do all the required readings; as such it does not meet the 300-level seminar requirement, but it may be used as a distribution requirement within the area.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

AAS 394 INTERNSHIP

Experience in an applied setting supervised on site. Approved and overseen by a University instructor.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

AAS 396 SENIOR THESIS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2016