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Undergraduate

Courses

Courses currently being offered:

Fall >
Spring >

Check the course schedules/descriptions available via the Registrar's Office for the official schedules for the widest range of terms for which such information is available.

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Below you will find a list of all undergraduate courses that have been offered.
NOTE: Not all of these courses are offered in any given year.

ASL 101 BEGINNING AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I

This course is online only with no on campus classroom time. An introductory course in American Sign Language as developed and used by the Deaf community in most areas of North America. Everyday communication is the centerpiece of every lesson. Topics revolve around sharing information about our environment and us. Grammar is introduced in context, with an emphasis on developing question and answer skills. You learn conversational strategies to help you maintain a conversation. Students will also be exposed to native signers modeling appropriate language and cultural behaviors in various situations. On line interaction activities allow you to rehearse what you’ve learned.

Prerequisites: None
Last Offered: Summer 2018

ASL 102 BEGINNING AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II

A continuation course in American Sign Language as developed and used by the Deaf community in most areas of North America. Everyday communication is the centerpiece of every lesson with a focus on expressing the language. Topics revolve around sharing information about our environment and us. Grammar is introduced in context, with an emphasis on developing question and answer skills. You learn conversational strategies to help you maintain a conversation. Students will also be exposed to Deaf Culture/history and native signers modeling appropriate language and cultural behaviors in various situations. Interaction activities allow you to rehearse what you’ve learned. Experience with the local Deaf community is required.

Prerequisites: ASL 101 in the immediately preceding semester or permission of the instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 105 INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I

The third in a sequence of courses, this course focuses on further development of conversational skills in ASL. Students will acquire and expand different conversational strategies and increase ASL vocabulary. Grammatical principles and functions will be emphasized. Appropriate cultural behaviors and conversational regulators in ASL will continue to be an important part of class. Information on Deaf Culture/history will be expanded. Experience with the local Deaf community is required.

Prerequisites: ASL 102 in the immediately preceding semester or permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 106 INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II

The fourth in a sequence of courses, this course focuses on further development of conversational and narrative skills in ASL. Students will learn and expand different conversational strategies and increase ASL vocabulary. An introduction to analysis of grammatical principles and functions will be included. Appropriate cultural behaviors and conversational regulators in ASL will continue to be an important part of class. Experience with the local Deaf community is required. NOTE: MUST obtain permission code from ASL Program advisor to register for this course. ASL Majors & Minors will be permitted to register first.​​

Prerequisites: ASL 105 in the immediately preceding semester or permission of the instructor. B or better in ASL 105
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 110 COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FRENCH SIGN LANGUAGE

An introductory course in French Sign Language (LSF) as developed and used by the Deaf community in France. Everyday communication is the centerpiece of every lesson. Topics revolve around sharing information about our environment and us. Grammar is introduced in context, with an emphasis on developing question and answer skills. You learn conversational strategies to help you maintain a conversation. Interaction activities allow you to rehearse what you’ve learned. Cultural behaviors of the Deaf Community in France will be introduced in various and appropriate situations.

Prerequisites: ASL 105 or permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 113 FRENCH SIGN LANGUAGE & DEAF CULTURE IN FRANCE

A unique study abroad experience in France for Deaf and hearing college-level ASL students and professionals. Take this opportunity to be immersed in French Sign Language and the French Deaf Community in various settings and further your understanding of the international Deaf World. Written and spoken French are not required.

Prerequisites: ASL 105 or permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Summer 2017

ASL 113X SIGN LANG&DEAF CULTR IN FRAN

No description

ASL 200 SIGNE LANGUAGE STRUCTURE

An examination of signed languages and the cognitive constraints that shape them, through a detailed consideration of the structure of American Sign Language and other natural signed languages of the world. Includes training in sign language notation and analysis.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 or permission of the instructor. B or better in ASL 106.
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 201 INTRODUCTION TO ASL LITERATURE

This course will introduce students to ASL literature by studying selected videos. Student will learn the origin, characteristics of ASL literature. Emphasis will be placed on historical background, meaning of the story content, discussion of grammatical features, styles revealed in these contexts and many different examples of literature delivered in American Sign Language (ASL): stories, humor, poems and folklore.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 or permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

ASL 202 HISTORY & CULTURE OF AMERICAN DEAF COMMUNITY

An overview of various aspects of American Deaf culture, including descriptions of deafness, Deaf history, education, art and sports will allow students to explore and discuss issues facing the Deaf community. Contrasting a Deaf cultural view with the majority medical view will be discussed. Analysis of the local Deaf community is required.

Prerequisites: ASL 105 in the immediately preceding semester or another advanced course in ASL, or permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

ASL 203 ADVANCED ASL

The fifth in a sequence of course, this course is designed for the advanced study of ASL. It provides students with the opportunity to increase their ASL expressive competence, and to use ASL in a variety of discourse and narrative settings. Skills to be developed are: storytelling, semantic awareness analysis, in-depth exploration of ASL grammar and complex uses of space, ways of making transitions between ideas, use of classifiers, and determining appropriate perspective in specific texts. Experience with the local Deaf community through interviews is required. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 in the immediately preceding semester or permission of the instructor. B or better in ASL 106
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 204 THEORY & PRACTICE OF SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETING

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of Sign Language interpreting in the United States. This survey will provide students with the tools necessary for understanding: 1) the history of sign language interpreting and its impact on current models of interpreter processing, 2) the work that interpreters do, 3) the ethical foundations of the field, and 4) the multi-faceted issues related to working across languages and cultures. The course follows a seminar format and is highly interactive in nature to encourage critical thinking based on in-class discussions, assigned readings, and student projects.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 or permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

ASL 205 ART OF TRANSLATION ASL & ENGLISH

This course will explore the meaning of translation, practice various translation methods, and analyze both written English and recorded ASL texts, with a focus on the analysis of English texts and the development of ASL translations. Extensive discussion of various types of texts and the factors that must be considered when preparing an accurate ASL or English translation will contribute to students’ translation work. Satisfies the upper level writing requirement.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 and either ASL 201 or 202, or permission of the instructor. B or better in ASL 106
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 208 LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

Basic introduction to children's language development; including the acquisition of phonology, syntax, and semantics. Focuses on the acquisition of a first language by young children, and compares the acquisition of various spoken and signed languages to find possible universal principles of language learning. No signing skills required. Students should have a background in at least one of the fields pertinent to the course: language structure, psycholinguistics, cognitive science, developmental psychology, or general psychology.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite: one of BCS 152, BCS 172, or LIN 110
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 209 TEACHING ASL AS A 2ND LANGUAGE

This course is designed to provide hands-on experience in teaching different subjects in ASL and evaluating student competencies in ASL and to develop an understanding of current methods and theories regarding ASL as the classroom language. Students learn about the history of teaching and resources to support such efforts. Students are provided opportunities to practice basic teaching techniques and select appropriate materials to incorporate relevant cultural and grammatical features in their lessons. The course follows a seminar format and is highly interactive in nature to encourage discussions based on in-class lectures, assigned readings, and student teaching projects.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 or permission of the instructor. B or better in ASL 106.
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 222 ASL FINE ART

Over the course of the semester, the student will be introduced to the unique aspects of ASL Fine Arts. We will consider some original works of Fine Arts delivered in American Sign Language (ASL): Deaf writings and literature, Deaf arts, Deaf Theater and Deaf films. In addition, some questions we will explore as follows: What is ASL Fine Arts? How does ASL Fine Arts compare to other Fine Arts? How do Deaf people and ASL contribute to themes in these works? The instructor will show to you many different examples of ASL Fine Arts. Students are involved in having projects and give a presentation for each topic.

Prerequisites: ASL 201, 202 or permission of the instructor.
Last Offered: Spring 2016

ASL 250 SOCIO-LINGUISTICS OF DEAF COMMUNITY

A discussion and analysis of variation in ASL and its relation to variables of social situation and identity in American Deaf communities. Topics include theoretical and methodological concepts in sociolinguistics, levels of grammatical variation, and social variables such as region, identity, register and attitude. Research includes the language behavior of Deaf signers, children of deaf adults, third culture groups and the role of hearing L2 signers in the Deaf community.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 or permission of the instructor. B or better in ASL 106
Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 260 LANGUAGE & PSYCHOLINGUISTICS

An overview of the nature and processing of human languages, including comparisons between language and animal communication systems, a consideration of the biological bases of human language, and discussion of the cognitive mechanisms used in producing and understanding language. Students taking this course should have a background in at least one of the fields pertinent to the material of the course: language structure, psycholinguistics, cognitive science, or general psychology.

Prerequisites: One of BCS 110, BCS 111, BCS 112 or LIN 110.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

ASL 280 DEAF-RELATED CAREERS

Bringing together historical information and career preparation strategies for teaching, service provision and other related fields, this course is designed to provide an understanding of the interaction between hearing signers and deaf signers in various professional settings. Inherent in these interactions is the concept of “Third Culture”, the place where deaf and hearing people meet and relate with one another; a neutral zone where the cultures of each group sometimes co-exist and sometimes collide. The course also provides an opportunity to explore ways of navigating this Third Culture zone as hearing people work and interact with deaf people. The course follows a seminar format and is highly interactive in nature to encourage discussions based on in-class lectures, assigned readings, and student projects.

Prerequisites: ASL 106 and either ASL 201 or 202 in the immediately preceding semester, or permission of the instructor. B or better in ASL 106
Last Offered: Fall 2017

ASL 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2018

ASL 392 PRACTICUM

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017