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Course List

PSC 288 Game Theory

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  • Spring 2019
    Tasos Kalandrakis
    Spring 2019 — MW 15:25 - 16:40

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Fall 2018
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2018 — TR 9:40 - 10:55

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Spring 2018
    Tasos Kalandrakis
    Spring 2018 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Fall 2017
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2017 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Spring 2017
    Bradley Smith
    Spring 2017 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Fall 2016
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2016 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    ECO 207 is a prerequisite for this course. Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his or her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is required.

  • Spring 2016
    Tasos Kalandrakis
    Spring 2016 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory, despite its frivolous-sounding name, gives us a unified approach to understanding social phenomena. It helps us understand not just the way people play games in the usual sense, like tic-tac-toe, chess or poker, but the way they behave in complex social situations as well. Examples of situations to which we will apply the theory include (but are not limited to): arms races, provision of public goods, competition between firms, electoral campaigns, voting, auctions, and bargaining. While there are no formal prerequisites, aptitude for logical or mathematical reasoning is desirable.

  • Fall 2015
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2015 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    ECO 207 is a prerequisite for this course. Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his or her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is required.

  • Spring 2015
    Tasos Kalandrakis
    Spring 2015 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory, despite its frivolous-sounding name, gives us a unified approach to understanding social phenomena. It helps us understand not just the way people play games in the usual sense, like tic-tac-toe, chess or poker, but the way they behave in complex social situations as well. Examples of situations to which we will apply the theory include (but are not limited to): arms races, provision of public goods, competition between firms, electoral campaigns, voting, auctions, and bargaining. While there are no formal prerequisites, aptitude for logical or mathematical reasoning is desirable.

  • Fall 2014
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2014 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    ECO 207 is a prerequisite for this course. Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his or her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is required.

  • Spring 2014
    Tasos Kalandrakis
    Spring 2014 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory, despite its frivolous-sounding name, gives us a unified approach to understanding social phenomena. It helps us understand not just the way people play games in the usual sense, like tic-tac-toe, chess or poker, but the way they behave in complex social situations as well. Examples of situations to which we will apply the theory include (but are not limited to): arms races, provision of public goods, competition between firms, electoral campaigns, voting, auctions, and bargaining. While there are no formal prerequisites, aptitude for logical or mathematical reasoning is desirable.

  • Fall 2013
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2013 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Spring 2013
    Konstantinos Matakos
    Spring 2013 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Fall 2012
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2012 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Spring 2012
    Mark Fey
    Spring 2012 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Fall 2011
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2011 — TR 9:40 - 10:55

    An introduction to the game theory with numerous applications to economic and political settings.

  • Spring 2011
    Tasos Kalandrakis
    Spring 2011 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory, despite its frivolous-sounding name, gives us a unified approach to understanding social phenomena. It helps us understand not just the way people play games in the usual sense, like tic-tac-toe, chess or poker, but the way they behave in complex social situations as well. Examples of situations to which we will apply the theory include (but are not limited to): arms races, provision of public goods, competition between firms, electoral campaigns, voting, auctions, and bargaining. While there are no formal prerequisites, aptitude for logical or mathematical reasoning is desirable.

  • Fall 2010
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2010 — TR 9:40 - 10:55
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

  • Spring 2010
    Tasos Kalandrakis
    Spring 2010 — MW 15:25 - 16:40
    Course Syllabus

    Game theory, despite its frivolous-sounding name, gives us a unified approach to understanding social phenomena. It helps us understand not just the way people play games in the usual sense, like tic-tac-toe, chess or poker, but the way they behave in complex social situations as well. Examples of situations to which we will apply the theory include (but are not limited to): arms races, provision of public goods, competition between firms, electoral campaigns, voting, auctions, and bargaining. There are no formal prerequisites,but some aptitude for logical or mathematical reasoning is desirable.

  • Fall 2009
    Paulo Barelli
    Fall 2009 — TR 9:40 - 10:55

    Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.