Department of Political Science

Courses — Spring 2017

Political Science

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PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Spring 2017 — MWF 10:25-11:15
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and Government
New International Relations Track: Governance of Nations
Old Political Science Field: Comparative PoliticsIntroductory Courses
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

This course is an introduction to the study of political science and comparative politics. It focuses on how citizens may be able to control public policies in different modern democracies. The course begins by applying some of these ideas briefly to the American political system. It then turns explicitly to the politics of contemporary Britain, Russia and Germany, examining the political culture, the basic institutional arrangements, the party system, the voters' choices, and the policymaking system in each country. These systems will be compared to each other, to the United States and, occasionally, to other democracies. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science, or international relations, and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of democracies.

PSC 105 Introduction to American Politics

Douglas Johnson
Spring 2017 — MWF 11:50-12:40
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New Political Science Track: Elections and Government
Old Political Science Field: American PoliticsIntroductory Courses

How has presidential behavior changed over time? What strategic decisions do members of Congress make to achieve their goals? Why has the American electorate become so polarized? This course introduces students to the foundations of American government. Key concepts at the heart of American politics will be introduced, their evolution over time presented, and their place in contemporary politics discussed. The course is appropriate for majors and non-majors with an interest in understanding how the American political system works.

PSC 107 Introduction to Positive Political Theory

Stuart Jordan
Spring 2017 — TR 11:05-12:20
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New Political Science Track: Data and Modeling
Old Political Science Field: Positive TheoryIntroductory Courses

Positive political theory is a line of thought that starts with the premise that politics amounts to nothing more or less than a process through which we choose between the competing values, wants or interests of different persons. It asks whether widely-held aspirations regarding how such conflicts are resolved are actually possible to realize, and, if so, how. In this class you will learn and practice the basic techniques that positive political theorists use to explore this simple but powerful view of politics.

PSC 200 Data Analysis I

Kevin A. Clarke
Spring 2017 — MWF 11:50-12:40
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New Political Science Track: Data and Modeling
Old Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis

Labs - F: 14:00-15:15 Data analysis has become a key part of many fields including politics, business, law, and public policy. This course covers the fundamentals of data analysis, giving students the necessary statistical skills to understand and critically analyze contemporary political, legal, and policy puzzles. Lectures will focus on the theory and practice of quantitative analysis and weekly lab sessions will guide students through the particulars of statistical software. No prior knowledge of statistics or data analysis is required.

PSC 212 Supreme Court in U.S. History

Joel Seligman
Spring 2017 — M 16:50-19:30
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New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPhilosophy, Law, and Public PolicyTeam Learning
Old Political Science Field: American Politics

This seminar will study leading constitutional law cases decided by the United States Supreme Court and their impact on the evolution of the Court, the balance of powers among our three governmental branches, relations between the federal government and the states, and individual express and implied rights. The seminar is intended to introduce students to legal reasoning and will make use of casebook and teaching methods typical of law schools.

PSC 222 U.S. Presidency

Stuart Jordan
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — TR 15:25-16:40
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New Political Science Track: Elections and Government
Old Political Science Field: American Politics

This course introduces the major topics and theoretical perspectives in the study of the U.S. presidency. Topics include: rationales for and effects of separation of powers; the presidency in comparative perspective; the nature and origin of the president's influence on policy; the president's role in lawmaking and the veto; presidential management of the executive branch; war powers and the president's role in national security.

PSC 227 Designing American Democracy

Michael Gibilisco
Spring 2017 — MW 11:50-13:05
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New Political Science Track: Data and ModelingElections and Government
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses

Why does the U.S. Constitution feature separation of powers and protect states' rights? Should the Senate have a filibuster? When can Congress agree on the best policy for the country (and what does "best" even mean)? This course uses a rigorous set of tools including game theory to help students understand the structure of American government. With these tools, we will study US electoral systems, Congress, federalism, and the courts, with a focus on understanding how the country has tried to overcome the challenges of group decision making and the inevitable conflicts that arise between the branches of government. Students will leave the course with a deeper understanding of how rules and strategy shape U.S. democracy. No prior background in game theory is necessary for this course.

PSC 230 Law in Public Health Practice

Mary Elizabeth McNulty
Spring 2017 — MW 19:40-20:55
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New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public PolicyTeam Learning
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses

The course focuses on government powers, duties, and restraints to assure the health of all populations; by examining the theories and concepts behind public health law, by describing the laws that create programs and policies for the vulnerable populations with which public health is concerned, and by exploring the constitutional tensions between public health efforts and the counterbalancing rights to liberty, freedom of speech, of association, and others. The format of the course combines lectures with current-event case studies, and community field visits.

PSC/IR 239 International Environmental Law

Terry Noto
Spring 2017 — MW 14:00-15:15
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public PolicyPolitical Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPolitics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Global Security (A)Governance of Nations (C)

An examination of international environmental law and policy with a special focus on efforts to address climate change. This course serves as a companion to PSC 246, but PSC 246 is not a prerequisite. The goal of this course is to provide a foundational understanding of this rapidly developing, controversial field. Topics include consideration of the scientific, political, and economic drivers of international environmental law; the variety of tools (e.g., treaties, agreements, "soft law," voluntary incentive programs and market based approaches); and examples of how some international environmental issues have been addressed to date. Finally, we will examine the 2015 Paris Climate Change Accord, subsequent developments and international efforts to get closer to a "grand climate solution." This course will be taught through lectures, discussion, several concise papers, and a group discussion and project(s).

PSC 240 Criminal Procedure and Constitutional Principles

Edward L. Fiandach
Spring 2017 — MW 16:40-18:05
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New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public Policy
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses

Through analysis of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, we examine criminal procedure as elaborated by federal and state court decisions. Topics include arrest procedures, search and seizure, right to counsel, and police interrogation and confessions. We will discuss the theoretical principles of criminal procedure and the application of those principles to the actual operation of the criminal court system.

PSC 247 Green Markets: Environmental Opportunities and Pitfalls

Lawrence Rothenberg
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — TR 11:05-12:20
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPhilosophy, Law, and Public PolicyPolitical Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Politics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: American Politics

In recent years, there has been much discussion of the possibility of a green economy. This course examines the potential for "green markets," focusing on three drivers-social, political, and economic-that can both constrain firms and potentially condition whether issues of environment and sustainability can be exploited as a means for competitive advantage. Among issues covered will be demand and willingness to pay for green goods, the roles of NGOs and investors, regulation and its alternatives, firm reputation and product differentiation, supply chain management, and green production processes. Special attention will be given to the need of firms to deal with climate change now and in the future.

PSC/IR 254 The U.S. in the Middle East

Svanhildur Thorvaldsdottir
Spring 2017 — MW 10:25-11:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentWar, Violence, and Cooperation
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPeace and Conflict
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Global Security (A)

What are the United States' foreign policy interests in countries such as Syria, Iran, or Saudi Arabia? What determines those interests and how are they pursued? This course will focus on the processes by which U.S. foreign policy is formulated and executed, using examples from the Middle East as its subject material. Readings and lectures will examine the relationship between U.S. government agencies (White House, State Department, Defense Department, CIA, Congress, etc.) and specific foreign policy instruments (declaratory policy, diplomacy, military presence, arms transfers, covert action, etc.) in the pursuit of national goals. Special attention will be devoted to the analysis of U.S. regional policy in the Middle East starting in the second half of the 20th century.

PSC/IR 255 Poverty and Development

Anderson Frey
Spring 2017 — TR 12:30-13:45
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Political Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Politics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Comparative PoliticsInternational Relations
Old International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)

Why are some countries poor, while others enjoy a high standard of living? Why some enjoy stability and freedoms, while others suffer with corruption, repression and violence? Why countries stagnate or decline in their economic development. This course is designed to provide a broad theoretical framework for thinking about these problems, focusing on the political and institutional causes of differences in economic development across countries. Topics include the role of political systems, leaders, and institutions in economic growth. The relationship between development and ethnic and class conflict, corruption, culture, the organization of state, electoral rules, and democratization. The role of Western intervention in the developing world, from slavery to modern foreign aid.

PSC/IR 256 Theories of Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPolitical Economy and DevelopmentWar, Violence, and Cooperation
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPeace and ConflictPolitics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

This course introduces theories in the field of comparative politics. We want to understand how the national and international environment, the political culture, the political institutions and the choices of citizens and leaders affect political performance. We explain democratization, stability, competition, citizen influence, and policy outcomes as consequences of the environment, culture and institutions--and human choices in these contexts. The theories of comparative politics offer such explanations. In this course we want to introduce some of the theories and evaluate their credibility, both through general readings and by seeing how they play out in some specific countries. We shall especially use politics in Germany, Britain and India to exemplify various theoretical features.

PSC/IR 257 The Origins of the Modern World

Alexander Lee
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — W 14:00-16:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPolitical Economy and DevelopmentTeam Learning
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPolitics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Old International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)Governance of Nations (C)

This course is designed to give students a background in the causes and consequences of the changes in political, economic and social changes that have so profoundly altered the world over the past five centuries, and a basic knowledge of both classic and contemporary scholarly accounts of these changes. After describing political and economic conditions in the pre-modern world, it describes how a distinctively ''modern'' political economy emerged in Western Europe, how this political economy became pervasive over the rest of the world, and the long term and continuing consequences of these changes. The reading mixes classic historical and social scientific accounts. While there are no prerequisites, students should note that the course will involve an unusually high, and enforced, level of required reading.

PSC/IR 278 Foundations of Modern International Politics

Hein Goemans
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — R 15:25-18:05
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New Political Science Track: Data and ModelingWar, Violence, and Cooperation
New International Relations Track: Peace and Conflict
Old Political Science Field: International Relations
Old International Relations Track: Global Security (A)

The bargaining model of war is the main theoretical tool in the study of international conflict these days. But the model brackets, i.e., ignores, the question of what gets put on the bargaining table in the first place, and what leaders and states choose not to contest. In this course, we examine the issues states fight over from both a historical as well as contemporary perspective. The course will involve some basic new analytical tools such as GIS (Geographical Information Systems) and some very basic data analysis.

PSC 288 Game Theory

Bradley Smith
Spring 2017 — MW 15:25-16:40
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New Political Science Track: Data and Modeling
Old Political Science Field: Positive Theory

Game theory is a systematic study of strategic situations. It is a theory that helps us analyze economic and political strategic issues, such as behavior of individuals in a group, competition among firms in a market, platform choices of political candidates, and so on. We will develop the basic concepts and results of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, repeated games and games with incomplete information. The objective of the course is to enable the student to analyze strategic situations on his/her own. The emphasis of the course is on theoretical aspects of strategic behavior, so familiarity with mathematical formalism is desirable.

PSC/IR 289 The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective

Joseph E. Inikori
Spring 2017 — T 14:00-16:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Political Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Politics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)

the debate on the role of the state versus that of the free market in the socioeconomic process is as old as the history of political economy. We discuss what economists, political scientists, & economic historians characterize as the Washington consensus versus the Beijing consensus or the Asian model. This is followed by a discussion of the contributions of some notable thinkers - Adam Smith, Alexander Hamilton, Friedrich List, John Maynard Keynes, & Friedrich von Hayek. The greater part of the course deals with selected historical cases across the globe. The discussions are informed by a political economy conceptual framework, which helps to explain the politics and economics of state policy and the long-run historical processes that created the political & economic conditions. Students' performance is based on three short essays (four typed pages each) presented to the class for discussion and thereafter revised for grading. No mid-term & final examinations

PSC 290 The Historical Origins of Unequal Development Among Ethnic Nationalities and State Policy

Joseph E. Inikori
Spring 2017 — MW 10:25-11:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Political Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Politics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)

The 2010 Brazilian national census shows 97.2 million Afro-Brazilians and 90.6 million Whites. These two ethnic nationalities have developed unequally since the establishment of colonial Brazil by Portugal in the sixteenth century. The 2010 census shows the average income of Afro-Brazilians was less than half that of White Brazilians. In 2009, the wealth gap between White and Black American families was $236,500. The most populous African nation, Nigeria, shows similar inequality among its major ethnic nationalities. This magnitude of inequality among ethnic nationalities has given rise to serious problems in inter-group relations in the three countries. This course aims to trace, comparatively, the historical origins of the phenomenon, examine the political and economic consequences, and discuss the politics and economics of state policy designed to address it. *NOTE: Students taking this Course for ECO credit must have previously taken ECO 108*

PSC 292 Ethics in Markets and In Public Policy

Andras Miklos
Spring 2017 — TR 12:30-13:45
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New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public Policy
Old Political Science Field: Political Philosophy

This course deals with ethics in markets and in the public domain. It will enable students to analyze ethical challenges arising in business and in public policy. The course begins by looking at the place of ethics in a competitive economy and in public policy. Next, it addresses ethical issues faced by decision-makers in complex institutions, including the nature of managerial and political responsibilities, and the problem of dirty hands. It explores ethical questions in health policy, drug development, corporate philanthropy and environmental protection. We will also consider morally controversial uses of markets in goods such as votes and bodily organs. Finally, we will look at questions of distributive justice in relation to labor protection, executive and employee compensation. No prior knowledge of political philosophy is required.

PSC 293 The Political Thought of Fredrick Douglass

Abraham Singer
Spring 2017 — R 14:00-16:40
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New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public Policy
Old Political Science Field: Political Philosophy

This course will be an in-depth study of Frederick Douglass's political philosophy. Often thought of as a political activist, orator, or statesman, we will read Douglass's work as that of a political theorist who offers novel insights into the nature of freedom, power, equality, race, and citizenship. We will begin by familiarizing ourselves with two traditions of political thought that Douglass worked within: republicanism and prophetic social critique. We will then spend the majority of the semester carefully reading most of Douglass's work -his autobiographies, his speeches, and writings- in historical context, in order to understand his theory of politics and society. Depending on time, we may also consider the impact of Douglass's thought on 20th century figures like Du Bois and Malcolm X. This course is an upper-year seminar, which assumes some familiarity with political philosophy; the reading load will be heavy and the seminar format will require a lot of student participation.

PSC/IR 299 Communicating Your Professional Identity in Political Science & International Relations

Kellie Hernandez
Spring 2017 — R 16:50-18:05
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Two-Credit Course

Two-credit course. Cannot be used to satisfy any requirements for the major or minor. This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester's end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today's competitive environment. This course is suitable for second-semester sophomores, juniors and first-semester seniors; all others require permission of the instructor.

PSC 304 Urban Crime and Justice

Craig Doran
Spring 2017 — 16:50-18:05
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New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public PolicyTeam Learning
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses

This course offers a unique opportunity for students to engage critically with justice in courthouses in local communities. Students will participate in hands-on experiential work in a selected area of focus at the Monroe County Courthouse in Rochester. Areas of focus to choose from include adult criminal justice, juvenile justice, treatment courts, domestic violence court, court-community partnerships, or equity disparities in the court. Weekly class meetings include university faculty and Judge Craig Doran, Chief Supervising Judge of all courts in the region, who share their perspectives, research, and experience on the matters addressed by students at the courthouse. This provides students with immediate immersion in both the theoretical and practical applications of justice in society. This course requires students spend 8 hours per week at the Monroe County Courts at the Hall of Justice in Rochester.

PSC 305 Poverty and Mental Health

John Walker
Spring 2017 — MW 9:00-10:15
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New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public PolicyTeam Learning
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses

This course will discuss on some of the major issues of contemporary poverty and mental health.Topics will include post-incarcerative re-adjustments, post-traumatic stress and military veterans, the black church as a therapeutic center, the effect of music on depression and other forms of mental hygiene, historical and contemporary mental health issues and immigration, and domestic violence, child abuse, suicidal ideation and its impact on the poor black family. Wherever relevant, patterns of racism and substance abuse will also be discussed. Students will be expected to attend each session, engage in verbal discussion with instructor and guest presenters, and through the composition of a personal paper demonstrate an understanding of and commitment to a poor urban community.

PSC 394 Local Law and Politics Internships

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2017
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New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPhilosophy, Law, and Public PolicyTeam Learning
Old Political Science Field: Internship

Most internship placements are in the District Attorney's or Public Defender's offices or in the local offices of U.S. members of Congress or Senators. Other internships are available depending on student interest. Interns work 10-12 hours per week through the entire semester. Grades are primarily based on a research paper. Applicants should have an appropriate course background for the internship and at least a B average. Students must be accepted in the course before approaching an agency for an internship. Applications are available from Professor L. Powell and an interest meeting is held just before preregistration each semester.

PSC 396 Washington Semester

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2017
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPhilosophy, Law, and Public PolicyTeam Learning
Old Political Science Field: Internship

These internships provide an opportunity to learn experientially one or more of the following: how government functions; how public policies are created, adopted and implemented; and how political campaigns work. Students intern in Congress, the executive branch, party campaign committees, and lobbying and advocacy groups. For applications and information, students should contact Professor L. Powell. An interest meeting is held each semester.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2017
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentTeam Learning
New International Relations Track: Governance of Nations
Old Political Science Field: Internship
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.

PSC 405 Linear Models

Kevin A. Clarke
Spring 2017 — TR 15:25-16:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis

In this course, we will examine the linear regression model and its variants. The course has two goals: (1) to provide students with the statistical theory of the linear model, and (2) to provide students with skills for analyzing data. The linear model is a natural starting point for understanding regression models in general, inferences based on them, and problems with our inferences due to data issues or to model misspecification. The model's relative tractability has made it an attractive tool for political scientists, resulting in volumes of research using the methods studied here. Familiarity with the linear model is now essentially required if one wants to be a consumer or producer of modern political science research.

PSC 408 Positive Political Theory

John Duggan
Spring 2017 — MW 10:00-12:00
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Positive Theory

This course is part of a rigorous introduction to the main concepts and results in positive political theory. It is the second half of a two-course sequence consisting of PSC 407 and PSC 408. This course will focus on the basics of game theory, which analyzes individual behavior in strategic situations. It will also cover the mathematical tools required to express the theory. Examples and applications will be drawn from several different areas in political science, including the American Congress, voting, international relations, political economy, and law.

PSC 480 Scope of Political Science

James Johnson, Bethany Lacina
Spring 2017 — R 9:30-12:00
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Political Philosophy

The aim of the seminar is to encourage students to examine political science in a reflective, disciplined, critical way. It is primarily designed for entering Ph.D. students, but may be appropriate for undergraduate seniors considering graduate work in political science. We use basic concepts in the philosophy of science to explore a range of specific examples of research in the discipline with the aim of discerning more clearly what it means to say that social and political inquiry is scientific. Undergraduates need permission of the instructor.

PSC 506 Advanced Topics in Methods

Curtis S. Signorino
Spring 2017 — T 9:30-12:00
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Techniques of Analysis

This course covers advanced statistical methods that go beyond linear models and maximum likelihood estimation. Course content will vary year to year and will be determined by the interests of the students and the instructor. Typical topics will include Bayesian markov chain monte carlo methods, ideal point estimation, non-parametric and semi-parametric estimation, causal inference, and machine learning techniques. As a research workshop, this course also allows students to pursue areas of individual interest in more depth. Students are assumed to have taken graduate courses in mathematical probability and inference (PSC 404), linear models (PSC 405), and maximum likelihood estimation (PSC 505). Students will be expected to know how to program their own estimators in R.

PSC 535 Bureaucratic Politics

Lawrence Rothenberg
Spring 2017 — M 12:30-15:15
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: American Politics

This course will survey recent research on the politics of bureaucracy. We will begin with a study of why and when elected politicians create bureaucracies and delegate authority to them. We will then study a series of topics regarding the operation and design of existing bureaucracies. Depending on the interest of students, topics may include: oversight and control of bureaucracies by elected politicians; bureaucratic capacity and performance; the political economy of regulatory bureaucracies; "red tape" and corruption; judicial control of bureaucracy; institutions and practices for the staffing of bureaucracies (e.g. patronage systems); advisory bureaucracies and bureaucratic expertise in policymaking; and military and intelligence bureaucracies. The course will draw heavily, but not exclusively, on formal theories and statistical evidence. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, or at least one course in Techniques of Analysis at the 200 level or above and one course in Positive Theory at the 200 level or above.

PSC 558 Comparative Parties and Elections

Bonnie M. Meguid
Spring 2017 — T 12:30-15:15
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Comparative Politics

How and why do political parties emerge? What are the causes and consequences of adopting different electoral rules? Under what conditions do voters behave strategically? This course examines the growing literature on parties, electoral systems, and voting in comparative politics. We consider multiple methodological approaches to these questions and explore the dynamics of voting, elections, and party competition in a range of empirical contexts.

PSC 565 Political Economy of Development

Alexander Lee
Spring 2017 — W 16:50-19:30
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Comparative Politics

This course surveys selected topics in the extensive literature on political and economic development. We will focus on differences in formal and informal institutions across countries. Topics will include the determinants of economic growth, the modernization hypothesis, distributional conflict, government corruption, the success and failure of states to deliver of public goods, among others.

PSC 572 International Politics Field Seminar

Randall Stone, Bethany Lacina
Spring 2017 — F 9:30-12:00
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: International Relations

An advanced course intended to prepare Ph.D. students for comprehensive exams in international relations. The course conducts a broad survey of influential works in the field and of current research into the causes of international conflict and cooperation. Extraordinarily well-prepared undergraduates may be admitted.

PSC 587 Structural Modeling and Estimation

Sergio Montero
Spring 2017 — MW 10:00-12:00
Display Tracks: New or Old

Structural models enable social scientists to conduct rich analyses of how institutions and public policy shape individual or collective decision-making. The structural approach to empirical research is particularly useful in settings where more traditional methods cannot be applied, such as when agents behave strategically or when we wish to predict the consequences of never-before-observed policy interventions. This course covers the fundamentals of structural modeling and estimation. Depending on student interest, applications from economics, marketing, and political science will be considered.

International Relations

Display Tracks: New or Old

PSC/IR 101 Introduction to Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Spring 2017 — MWF 10:25-11:15
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and Government
New International Relations Track: Governance of Nations
Old Political Science Field: Comparative PoliticsIntroductory Courses
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

This course is an introduction to the study of political science and comparative politics. It focuses on how citizens may be able to control public policies in different modern democracies. The course begins by applying some of these ideas briefly to the American political system. It then turns explicitly to the politics of contemporary Britain, Russia and Germany, examining the political culture, the basic institutional arrangements, the party system, the voters' choices, and the policymaking system in each country. These systems will be compared to each other, to the United States and, occasionally, to other democracies. This course is recommended for those thinking about a major, minor, or cluster in political science, or international relations, and others who are simply interested in learning more about the politics of democracies.

PSC/IR 239 International Environmental Law

Terry Noto
Spring 2017 — MW 14:00-15:15
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Philosophy, Law, and Public PolicyPolitical Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPolitics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Global Security (A)Governance of Nations (C)

An examination of international environmental law and policy with a special focus on efforts to address climate change. This course serves as a companion to PSC 246, but PSC 246 is not a prerequisite. The goal of this course is to provide a foundational understanding of this rapidly developing, controversial field. Topics include consideration of the scientific, political, and economic drivers of international environmental law; the variety of tools (e.g., treaties, agreements, "soft law," voluntary incentive programs and market based approaches); and examples of how some international environmental issues have been addressed to date. Finally, we will examine the 2015 Paris Climate Change Accord, subsequent developments and international efforts to get closer to a "grand climate solution." This course will be taught through lectures, discussion, several concise papers, and a group discussion and project(s).

IR 249 Israel/Palestine

Aaron Hughes
Spring 2017 — TR 14:00-15:15
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: War, Violence, and Cooperation
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPeace and Conflict
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Global Security (A)Governance of Nations (C)

This course will provide a non-partisan introduction to the conflict between these two national movements. Discussion will focus on an examination of historical documents, in addition to understanding of how it plays out in literature and film.

PSC/IR 254 The U.S. in the Middle East

Svanhildur Thorvaldsdottir
Spring 2017 — MW 10:25-11:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentWar, Violence, and Cooperation
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPeace and Conflict
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Global Security (A)

What are the United States' foreign policy interests in countries such as Syria, Iran, or Saudi Arabia? What determines those interests and how are they pursued? This course will focus on the processes by which U.S. foreign policy is formulated and executed, using examples from the Middle East as its subject material. Readings and lectures will examine the relationship between U.S. government agencies (White House, State Department, Defense Department, CIA, Congress, etc.) and specific foreign policy instruments (declaratory policy, diplomacy, military presence, arms transfers, covert action, etc.) in the pursuit of national goals. Special attention will be devoted to the analysis of U.S. regional policy in the Middle East starting in the second half of the 20th century.

PSC/IR 255 Poverty and Development

Anderson Frey
Spring 2017 — TR 12:30-13:45
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Political Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Politics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Comparative PoliticsInternational Relations
Old International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)

Why are some countries poor, while others enjoy a high standard of living? Why some enjoy stability and freedoms, while others suffer with corruption, repression and violence? Why countries stagnate or decline in their economic development. This course is designed to provide a broad theoretical framework for thinking about these problems, focusing on the political and institutional causes of differences in economic development across countries. Topics include the role of political systems, leaders, and institutions in economic growth. The relationship between development and ethnic and class conflict, corruption, culture, the organization of state, electoral rules, and democratization. The role of Western intervention in the developing world, from slavery to modern foreign aid.

PSC/IR 256 Theories of Comparative Politics

G. Bingham Powell, Jr.
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — TR 9:40-10:55
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPolitical Economy and DevelopmentWar, Violence, and Cooperation
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPeace and ConflictPolitics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

This course introduces theories in the field of comparative politics. We want to understand how the national and international environment, the political culture, the political institutions and the choices of citizens and leaders affect political performance. We explain democratization, stability, competition, citizen influence, and policy outcomes as consequences of the environment, culture and institutions--and human choices in these contexts. The theories of comparative politics offer such explanations. In this course we want to introduce some of the theories and evaluate their credibility, both through general readings and by seeing how they play out in some specific countries. We shall especially use politics in Germany, Britain and India to exemplify various theoretical features.

PSC/IR 257 The Origins of the Modern World

Alexander Lee
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — W 14:00-16:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentPolitical Economy and DevelopmentTeam Learning
New International Relations Track: Governance of NationsPolitics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Comparative Politics
Old International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)Governance of Nations (C)

This course is designed to give students a background in the causes and consequences of the changes in political, economic and social changes that have so profoundly altered the world over the past five centuries, and a basic knowledge of both classic and contemporary scholarly accounts of these changes. After describing political and economic conditions in the pre-modern world, it describes how a distinctively ''modern'' political economy emerged in Western Europe, how this political economy became pervasive over the rest of the world, and the long term and continuing consequences of these changes. The reading mixes classic historical and social scientific accounts. While there are no prerequisites, students should note that the course will involve an unusually high, and enforced, level of required reading.

PSC/IR 278 Foundations of Modern International Politics

Hein Goemans
Spring 2017 ("W" Optional) — R 15:25-18:05
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Data and ModelingWar, Violence, and Cooperation
New International Relations Track: Peace and Conflict
Old Political Science Field: International Relations
Old International Relations Track: Global Security (A)

The bargaining model of war is the main theoretical tool in the study of international conflict these days. But the model brackets, i.e., ignores, the question of what gets put on the bargaining table in the first place, and what leaders and states choose not to contest. In this course, we examine the issues states fight over from both a historical as well as contemporary perspective. The course will involve some basic new analytical tools such as GIS (Geographical Information Systems) and some very basic data analysis.

IR 283 Politics in the European Union

Andrea Wagner
Spring 2017
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and Government
New International Relations Track: Governance of Nations
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

The course is designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge and foster in them a sound understanding of the achievements and challenges of the European Union (EU). The course is divided into three parts. The first part seeks to familiarize the students with the institutional structure of the EU with a heavy focus on the functioning of the institutions of the European Union and the provisions of the Treaties on which the institutional life of the EU is premised. The study of the institutional life, political dilemmas and historical background of the European integration process will allow us to critically examine policymaking in the EU. The second part of the course will observe the complex processes that underpin decision-making in the EU, the juxtaposition and harmony between supranational and intergovernmental modes of decision-making, the co-existence and interaction between European and national policies. The third part of the course covers the current developments within the European Union and will address the EU's fight against corruption within its Member States, the recent migration crisis, the problem of enlargement and the rise of right- wing populist parties and other Eurosceptic actors.

PSC/IR 289 The Role of the State in Global Historical Perspective

Joseph E. Inikori
Spring 2017 — T 14:00-16:40
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Political Economy and Development
New International Relations Track: Politics, Policy, and Development
Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Political Economy and Development (B)

the debate on the role of the state versus that of the free market in the socioeconomic process is as old as the history of political economy. We discuss what economists, political scientists, & economic historians characterize as the Washington consensus versus the Beijing consensus or the Asian model. This is followed by a discussion of the contributions of some notable thinkers - Adam Smith, Alexander Hamilton, Friedrich List, John Maynard Keynes, & Friedrich von Hayek. The greater part of the course deals with selected historical cases across the globe. The discussions are informed by a political economy conceptual framework, which helps to explain the politics and economics of state policy and the long-run historical processes that created the political & economic conditions. Students' performance is based on three short essays (four typed pages each) presented to the class for discussion and thereafter revised for grading. No mid-term & final examinations

PSC/IR 299 Communicating Your Professional Identity in Political Science & International Relations

Kellie Hernandez
Spring 2017 — R 16:50-18:05
Display Tracks: New or Old
Old Political Science Field: Two-Credit Course

Two-credit course. Cannot be used to satisfy any requirements for the major or minor. This interactive course teaches "real life" communication skills and strategies that help students present their best professional selves and develop a fulfilling career. Students will explore and articulate their internship, career and graduate school goals for distinct audiences and purposes as they develop a professional communication portfolio of materials such as resumes, cover letters, statements of purpose, electronic communications, elevator pitches, project descriptions and abstracts, and online profiles (i.e., LinkedIn). Students will revise and refine their written and spoken work across the semester based on feedback from peers, instructors, and alumni. By the semester's end, students will have gained extensive experience with the communication skills expected in today's competitive environment. This course is suitable for second-semester sophomores, juniors and first-semester seniors; all others require permission of the instructor.

PSC/IR 397 European Political Internship

Lynda W. Powell
Spring 2017
Display Tracks: New or Old
New Political Science Track: Elections and GovernmentTeam Learning
New International Relations Track: Governance of Nations
Old Political Science Field: Internship
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

Internships are available for students in Edinburgh, London, Brussels, Bonn, Berlin and Madrid. Internships are in English in Edinburgh, London, and Brussels: students need proficiency in the language for the latter four placements. For applications and information, students should contact the Study Abroad Office in Dewey Hall 2147.