Department of Political Science

IR 204 Dictatorship and Democracy

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Old Political Science Field: Associated Courses
Old International Relations Track: Governance of Nations (C)

This course is archived. It will not be offered again.

Adam Cohon
Fall 2013 — TR 9:40-10:55

Course Syllabus

Francis Fukuyama over twenty years ago predicted that democracy was the final regime type, and that all countries would in time embrace it. In this course we examine where he was right, and where he was wrong. We first define democratic and authoritarian regime types, and the presence of both types and hybrid types across the world. We examine both democratic breakdown and democratic transitions, using cases from Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America since the Second World War. In studying democratic transitions, we also develop theories on why particular countries remain non-democratic. In the final section of the course, we examine the persistence of non-democratic regimes and the prospects for future democratic transitions, particularly in China and in the recent "Arab Spring." In each section, we will consider actor-based, structural, and institutional explanations for regime change.

Adam Cohon
Fall 2012 — TR 11:05-12:20

Course Syllabus

Francis Fukuyama over twenty years ago predicted that democracy was the final regime type, and that all countries would in time embrace it. In this course we examine where he was right, and where he was wrong. We first define democratic and authoritarian regime types, and the presence of both types and hybrid types across the world. We examine both democratic breakdown and democratic transitions, using cases from Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America since the Second World War. In studying democratic transitions, we also develop theories on why particular countries remain non-democratic. In the final section of the course, we examine the persistence of non-democratic regimes and the prospects for future democratic transitions, particularly in China and in the recent "Arab Spring." In each section, we will consider actor-based, structural, and institutional explanations for regime change.