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Courses

Spring 2021 Courses and Instructors

 

GSWS main courses - Spring 2021

GSWS Course Number

Co-located Course Numbers

Course Title

Instructor

Meeting Time

Click Image for Description and Instructor Bio

GSWS 100-1

 

Topics in GSW: The Politics of Location: Space, Place, and GenderTulke, Julia

R 2:00pm - 4:40pm

Online

Photo of Julia Tulke standing in profile in front of a wall of graffiti
GSWS 200-1

GSWS 200W-1
HIST 259-1
HIST 259W-1

History of Feminism: ColloquiumBakhmetyeva, Tatyana

MW 10:25-11:40 

Online

Photo of Tanya bakhmetyeva smiling in front of a bookcase
GSWS 206-1

PHLT 206-1Global Politics of Gender and HealthO'Donnell, Rachel

MW 2:00pm - 3:15pm

In-person

Photo of Rachel Odonnell smiling in a well lit room
GSWS 212-1

ENGL 232-1, ENGL 432-1, GSWS 412-1Queer Thought, Queer InsurgenciesOsucha, Eden

MW 9:00am-10:15am

Online

headshot of eden osucha smiling
GSWS 291-1AAAS 251-1 (P), AHST 230-1, GSWS 291-1Black Mothers: Image & TheoryAmadou, Ouma

MW 9:00am-10:15am

Online

Ouma amadou sitting at a table with flowers and two drinks and smiling
GSWS 297-1AAAS 297-1 (P), AHST 297-1, ENGL 228-2Animating RaceSullivan, Patrick

TR 9:40am-10:55am

Patrick sullivan smiling and holding a baby outside
GSWS 393-1

GSWS 393H-1Major Senior Seminar/Honors Major Senior SeminarBakhmetyeva, Tatyana

T 2:00pm - 4:40pm

Online

Photo of tanya bakhmetyeva smiling in front of a bookcase

  

All GSWS courses - Spring 2021

There will be many GSWS courses offered that are cross-listed with other departments and programs in addition to the ones we list directly through GSWS. Full course details can be found on the CDCS. Some of the Spring 2021 cross-listed GSWS courses include:

  • Contemporary Issues and Anthropology
  • Gender in Judaism
  • Black Preaching and Sacred Rhetoric
  • Psychology of Human Sexuality
  • Madness, Marriage, and Monstrosity: The Woman Reader, The Woman Writer, and the 19th-century Novel
  • Music, Ethnography & HIV/Aids
  • Anthropological Approaches to Gender and Sexuality
  • Matrix: Medieval and Early Modern Women's Writing
  • French Feminisms
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Her World
  • Family Repression and Rage in Film and Society
  • The Matter With Men in Film and Society
  • Gender, Love & Families
  • The New Black Family

Office hours

Questions about a course? Want to discuss your plans for your GSW Major, Minor, cluster? Talk with us! Our open virtual office hours during the Fall 2020 semester are:

  • Mondays 2-3pm with Kristin Doughty here
  • Tuesdays 2-4 with Tanya Bakhmetyeva here
  • Wednesdays 10-1 with Jane Bryant here
  • By appointment - email us at sbai@rochester.edu to set up a meeting time

Course details

GSWS 100-1 Topics in GSW: The Politics of Location: Space, Place, and Gender

Course Description

This course introduces students to the field of gender, sexuality, and women’s studies through the interdisciplinary perspective of space and place. Students will build a critical understanding of the ways in which the social production of space and place and the social construction of gender relations are variously interrelated, manifesting uneven geographies of power that are both symbolic and material. Who gets to belong, to feel “at home,” to “pass” in a certain space (a bathroom, a university, a city, a country) has everything to do with these processes. Drawing together theoretical texts, cultural artifacts, perspectives from political activism, and student’s own embodied experiences of being in the world this course engages and challenges such regimes of spatial injustice, taking inspiration from feminist and queer strategies of placemaking that subvert, intervene in, and appropriate space.


Instructor

Julia Tulke is a PhD candidate in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester, NY where she was an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Digital Humanities from 2017 to 2019 and currently serves as the managing editor of InVisible Culture: An Electronic Journal for Visual Culture. Her research centers on the politics and poetics of space, with a particular focus on material landscapes of urban crisis as sites of cultural production and political intervention. She maintains a long-standing interest in political street art and graffiti as performative repertoires of protest. For her ongoing research project Aesthetics of Crisis, Julia has documented and examined street art and graffiti in Athens, Greece since 2013.

 

GSWS 200-1 History of Feminism: Colloquium

Course Description

In this colloquium we will look at the history of international feminism and explore its many faces. We will examine the various factors that have contributed to women’s historically lower status in society; will look at the emergence of women’s rights and feminist movements as well as the distinctions among various feminist theories, and will discuss the relevance of feminism today.

Instructor

I am trained as a Modern Russian historian with a particular interest in women’s and religion history, but since the publication of my recent book, Mother of the Church: Sofia Svechina, the Salon, and the Politics of Catholicism in Nineteenth-Century Russia and France (Northern Illinois University Press, 2016; winner of 2018 Harry Koenig Book Award, American Catholic Historical Association), I have broadened my research to Eastern Europe, especially Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus, adding to my longstanding interest in gender and religion such topics as masculinity, gender and environment, ecofeminism, and gender and national identity. I am currently working on a new book project, Gendered Woods: Białowieza Forest, Gender, and Polish National Identity, which focuses on the past and present of the Białowieza forest. The rich history of the forest makes Białowieza a site where competing visions of Polish national and gender identity come together in a complex interplay of symbols, stories, and images, turning the forest into a highly contested ground that various groups use to negotiate Poland’s place and role in the EU and test their power to shape the country’s identity.

As one of the recipients of 2016 University of Rochester Research Award, Tanya Bakhmetyeva also works on an oral history research project in Ladakh, India where she conducts a study on gender and climate change.

 

GSWS 206-1 Global Politics of Gender and Health

Course Description

This interdisciplinary course is an introduction to critical concepts and approaches used to investigate the intersections of gender, health, and illness, particularly in the context of individual lives both locally and transnationally. Special attention will be paid to the historical and contemporary development of medical knowledge and practice, including debates on the roles of health-care consumers and practitioners, as well as global linkages among the health industry, international trade, and health sector reform in the developing world. Emerging issues around the politics of global health include clinical research studies, bodily modification practices, and reproductive justice movements. This is a writing-intensive course and may be counted toward the University of Rochester’s Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies (GSW) major, minor, or cluster.

Instructor

Rachel O’Donnell is an Assistant Professor in the Writing, Speaking, and Argument Program. She holds a BA in English and Political Science from Moravian College and an MA and PhD in Political Science from York University. She also holds a Graduate Diploma in Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Her research is on the history and political economy of bioprospecting in the Americas, and she has also written about the revolutionary forces during the Guatemalan civil war as well as the legacy of the Central American civil wars on development and policy in the region.

She previously served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Guatemala and worked as a researcher with the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC) in Toronto.

 

GSWS 212-1 Queer Thought, Queer Insurgencies 

Course Description

This course examines how the body of scholarly work known by the early 1990s as “Queer Theory” formed in relation to the crisis of the AIDS epidemic and also how concepts of social justice, utopic world-making, and political desire continue to inform and shape the field of Queer Studies in the present. Thus, we will study now-canonical work in Literature and the humanities concerned with the production and regulation of gender and sexuality through norms of identity and embodiment (e.g., Butler, Foucault, Sedgwick, Bersani) alongside contemporaneous scholarship intervening more directly into the AIDS crisis’s politics of meaning. Histories of queer AIDS activism and art-making will provide further context for that movement and moment. Turning to more recent work in Queer Studies—especially debates over anti-normativity, reframings of the field by Queer of Color critique, and the emergence of Trans Studies—we will examine where and how “queer” continues to function as a sign of resistance and insurgency, both in scholarship and alongside it, engaging sites such as the UndocuQueer movement and Disability Studies queer coinage of “Crip” identity.


Instructor

Dr. Osucha is a Visiting Associate Professor of English and Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies whose areas of research expertise include Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Literature and Culture, African American Studies, Legal Studies, Critical Race Studies, Visual Culture, Queer Studies, and Feminist Theory.

 

GSWS 291-1 Black Mothers: Image and Theory

Course Description

At the closing of her canonical essay, “Mama’s Baby, Papa’s Maybe: An American Grammar Book”, Hortense Spillers writes “[…] it is our task to make a place for this different social subject”. This course is invested in making a place for this different social subject: black mothering. Using Spillers’ essay as the theoretical frame of the course, we will analyze varying visual representations of black mothering in the US and the diaspora. Topics covered in this course will include racial tropes of mothering, theories of matriarchy and queer parenting, kinship and dispossession. Each week this course will pair visual material with historical and theoretical readings. Examples include the films Imitation of Life (1959), Down in the Delta (1998), Moonlight (2016), Ma (2019). We will read from scholars such as Hortense Spillers, Patricia Hill Collins, Christina Sharpe, Tressie McMillan Cotton. Course assignments will include brief response papers and a final research paper. Prior experience with visual analysis is welcome but not required.

Instructor

PhD student in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester. Interests include film and media studies; (post)colonialism; critical race theory; psychoanalysis; water and landscapes.

 

GSWS 297-1 Animating Race

Course Description

As Disney’s recent disclaimer of “outdated cultural depictions” that accompanies racist portrayals in its classical animation suggests, the relationship between race and animation has often been vexed. This course will explore—through both historical and formal approaches—the roles race and racism perform in animated cultural expressions—cinema, television, and video games. With a commitment to intersectionality, this course explores and interrogates gender, sexuality, and class in tandem with race. Topics will include minstrelsy and early animation; racial grotesqueness and independent animation; African-American culture in anime; blackness and kinetic economies; censorship and television cartoons; video game avatars and gendered embodiment.

Instructor

Patrick Sullivan is a PhD student in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester.

Patrick’s current research focuses on television’s remediation of cinema’s and radio’s sonic forms, with particular weight given to non-realist genres. Approaching television, and the moving-image at large, with a method grounded in critical theory and aesthetics, his research analyzes the relationship between sound, form, and time.
 

GSWS 393-1 Major Senior Seminar 

Course Description

Required course for GSWS majors typically taken during a student's eighth semester. Honors track option is co-located using the number 393H-1.


Instructor

I am trained as a Modern Russian historian with a particular interest in women’s and religion history, but since the publication of my recent book, Mother of the Church: Sofia Svechina, the Salon, and the Politics of Catholicism in Nineteenth-Century Russia and France (Northern Illinois University Press, 2016; winner of 2018 Harry Koenig Book Award, American Catholic Historical Association), I have broadened my research to Eastern Europe, especially Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus, adding to my longstanding interest in gender and religion such topics as masculinity, gender and environment, ecofeminism, and gender and national identity. I am currently working on a new book project, Gendered Woods: Białowieza Forest, Gender, and Polish National Identity, which focuses on the past and present of the Białowieza forest. The rich history of the forest makes Białowieza a site where competing visions of Polish national and gender identity come together in a complex interplay of symbols, stories, and images, turning the forest into a highly contested ground that various groups use to negotiate Poland’s place and role in the EU and test their power to shape the country’s identity.

As one of the recipients of 2016 University of Rochester Research Award, Tanya Bakhmetyeva also works on an oral history research project in Ladakh, India where she conducts a study on gender and climate change.