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Courses

Fall 2020 Courses and Instructors

 

GSWS Course Number

Co-located Course Numbers

Course Title

Instructor

Meeting Time

Click Image for Description and Instructor Bio

GSWS 100-2

ENGL 140-1
FMST 212-1

Robot Love: Decoding Gender in TechnologyChester, Alicia

W 9:00am - 11:40pm

Online

Photo of alicia chester smiling next to a dog
GSWS 105-1

Sex and PowerBakhmetyeva, Tatyana

M 2:00pm - 4:40pm

Hybrid

bakh
GSWS 105-2

Sex and PowerHolloway, David

MW 9:00am - 10:15am

Hybrid

holloway
GSWS 215-1

Lgbtq Histories and CulturesRich, KaeLyn

R 6:15pm - 8:55pm

Online

rich2
GSWS 259-1

Food Matters: Gender, Religion, Ethnicity, and ConsumerismBakhmetyeva, Tatyana

T 2:00pm - 4:40pm

Hybrid

bakh

GSWS 280-2

AAAS 280-1
GSWS 480-1
Intersectionality: the History of an IdeaOsucha, Eden

MW 11:50am - 1:05pm

Online

osucha

GSWS 262

AAAS 262Black Feminism & Popular CulturePrince, Alisa

TR 9:00-10:15am
Online

aprince

 

 

GSWS 100-2 Robot Love: Decoding Gender in Technology

Course Description

We often think of technology as something that is separate from our bodies, without gender, race, sexual orientation, or (dis)ability. How do preconceived ideas and inherent biases about identity inform the development and use of technology? The field of media archaeology offers a means to understand gendered and racial biases inherited by new technology through studying new and old technologies—and their cultural representations in advertising and media—for successes, failures, and alternative possibilities that were never realized. In a culture that is constantly adopting new technologies and upgrading gadgets, where does the history of technology and the people who developed it go? Women were often the unsung and forgotten laborers who manufactured and operated new technologies. By digging through layers of technological history and challenging the usual narrative of technological progress, this course questions assumptions underlying how technology is built and operates. It examines the relationship of technology to society and our everyday, embodied lives through taking concrete examples of technology, like photography or artificial intelligence, as case studies. We will also consider cultural imagination about technology and its oppressive or emancipatory possibilities. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach in the chosen readings and incorporates films and popular media. Classes rely upon student participation and discussion. Students will acquire critical skills to better understand our technological present with implications for the methodology and practice of creating new media and developing future technologies that break with the biases of the past.

This class can count for a ""media history, theory, and practice"" requirement for the DMS major and minor. This course may also be taken to fulfill and upper level writing requirement in consultation with the professor.

Instructor

chester
Alicia Chester

 

Alicia Chester is Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester. Her dissertation, entitled "Study Nature, Not Books: A Genealogy of Photography from Psychiatric Portraiture to Brain Imaging," examines the influence of photography from nineteenth-century portraits of psychiatric patients through the rise of neurology at the turn of the century to the later development of brain imaging. The genealogy traces the technological movement from photographing the outside of the body as a method of capturing internal states of mind (as in the cases of psychiatric patients) to imaging the interior of the body itself (using X-rays and brain imaging). Photography was at the center of this shift from exterior to interior, shaping the desire to delve deeper into the living body to view something quite immaterial: the mind.

Alicia is an artist, writer, and educator with a background in photography, film, video, and installation. She previously held the George Eastman Museum Graduate Fellowship (2018-2020), Andrew W. Mellon Digital Humanities Fellowship (2016-2018), and Collections Research Fellow at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago (2011-2012), where she also co-curated the group exhibition Peripheral Views: States of America in 2012. She has published essays in Afterimage: The Journal of Media Arts and Cultural Criticism and Dialectic, the peer-reviewed journal of the School of Architecture at the University of Utah. Alicia was an art critic for the online publication ArtSlant and a coeditor of and contributing author to Theorizing Visual Studies: Writing Through the Discipline (Routledge, 2012), an anthology directed by James Elkins. Her artwork has been exhibited in such venues as the Chicago Cultural Center, the Koehnline Museum of Art, the University of Michigan, and Artcite in Windsor, Ontario. She is currently working on a chapter about psychiatric photography and brain imaging for The Routledge Handbook of Health and Media, edited by Dr. Lester Friedman and Dr. Therese Jones.

 

GSWS 105-1 Sex and Power

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship of Gender, Sexuality and Women's studies and will be team taught by Tanya Bakhmetyeva (Associate Academic Director of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies). As a survey course, this class is designed to give students from diverse backgrounds and disciplines a basic understanding of debates and perspectives discussed in the field. We will use gender as a critical lens to examine some of the social, cultural, economic, scientific, and political practices that organize our lives. We will explore a multitude of feminist perspectives on the intersections of sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, religion, and other categories of identity. In this course, we will interrogate these categories as socially constructed while acknowledging that these constructions have real effects in subordinating groups, marking bodies, and creating structural, intersectional inequalities.


Instructor

bakhmetyeva
Tanya Bakhmetyeva

I am trained as a Modern Russian historian with a particular interest in women’s and religion history, but since the publication of my recent book, Mother of the Church: Sofia Svechina, the Salon, and the Politics of Catholicism in Nineteenth-Century Russia and France (Northern Illinois University Press, 2016; winner of 2018 Harry Koenig Book Award, American Catholic Historical Association), I have broadened my research to Eastern Europe, especially Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus, adding to my longstanding interest in gender and religion such topics as masculinity, gender and environment, ecofeminism, and gender and national identity. I am currently working on a new book project, Gendered Woods: Białowieza Forest, Gender, and Polish National Identity, which focuses on the past and present of the Białowieza forest. The rich history of the forest makes Białowieza a site where competing visions of Polish national and gender identity come together in a complex interplay of symbols, stories, and images, turning the forest into a highly contested ground that various groups use to negotiate Poland’s place and role in the EU and test their power to shape the country’s identity.

As one of the recipients of 2016 University of Rochester Research Award, Tanya Bakhmetyeva also works on an oral history research project in Ladakh, India where she conducts a study on gender and climate change.

 

GSWS 105-2 Sex and Power

Course Description

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship of Gender, Sexuality and Women's studies and will be team taught by Tanya Bakhmetyeva (Associate Academic Director of Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies). As a survey course, this class is designed to give students from diverse backgrounds and disciplines a basic understanding of debates and perspectives discussed in the field. We will use gender as a critical lens to examine some of the social, cultural, economic, scientific, and political practices that organize our lives. We will explore a multitude of feminist perspectives on the intersections of sex, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, religion, and other categories of identity. In this course, we will interrogate these categories as socially constructed while acknowledging that these constructions have real effects in subordinating groups, marking bodies, and creating structural, intersectional inequalities.


Instructor

holloway
David Holloway


David Holloway teaches courses on Japanese literature, popular culture, and "the body." Having completed graduate degrees at the University of Colorado at Boulder (2007) and Washington University in St. Louis (2014), his specialization is contemporary Japanese fiction with emphasis on gender and sexuality. His academic interests include youth cultures and subcultures, transgression, and Japan's "lost decade." Recent publications include "Gender, Body, and Disappointment in Kanehara Hitomi's Fiction" (Japanese Language and Literature, 2016) and "Topographies of Intimacy: Sex and Shibuya in Hasegawa Junko's Prisoner of Solitude" (US–Japan Women's Journal, 2016).

 

GSWS 215-1 LGBTQ Histories and Cultures

Course Description

This course is a discussion-based learning experience that explores the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, transgender, and intersex (LGBTQI) history, communities, and identity through theory, pop culture, literature, and intersectional analysis. Topics include the emergence of subcultures and the organized activist movements from the 1920's through today, early sexuality theory and poststructuralist queer theory, and major historical events including the AIDS epidemic and Stonewall Riots.


Instructor

rich

KaeLyn Rich. Photo by Erica Jae.


KaeLyn Rich (she/her) is a queer feminist, a direct action organizer, a nonprofit leader, a word wrangler, and a professional speaker.

Most recently, KaeLyn was the Executive Director of Bitch Media, an independent nonprofit feminist media organization best known for the essential Bitch Magazine. She’s a freelance writer and author whose first book, Girls Resist!: A Guide to Activist, Leadership, and Starting a Revolution (Quirk Books), a YA activism handbook was released in August 2018. She’s a contributing writer for the popular queer online publication, Autostraddle, where she writes biweekly columns on community organizing and queer parenting and other various content about queer politics, life, and culture. Her writing has been featured across the internet. In 2017, KaeLyn was featured in Her Voice Carries, a public mural art project about women lifting up other women and in an Emmy-nominated documentary film by the same name.

KaeLyn has over fourteen years of nonprofit campaign experience ranging from local grassroots movements to leading the field work of large statewide issue coalitions. KaeLyn spent eight years working for the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), the New York affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), managing regional offices across the state as the Assistant Advocacy Director for Chapters for two years and directing a regional office as Genesee Valley Chapter Director for six years. KaeLyn was the community affairs coordinator at Planned Parenthood of Central and Western New York. Through her campaign work, KaeLyn has led or co-led work on a wide range of issues including reproductive rights, voting rights, police reform, immigrant rights, transgender rights, marriage equality, gender equity, and more.

KaeLyn is a professional speaker on intersectionality, activism and organizing, and LGBTQ issues. She presents workshops in high schools, public libraries, bookstores, and college campuses to groups as small as four and as large as 4,000. From 2011-2015, she traveled to colleges and universities across the United States as a sexuality educator with Sex Discussed Here, co-presenting funny, smart, honest lectures and programs about sexual health and responsible intimacy, safer sex, LGBTQI+ issues and much more. (Yes, it was really fun!)

KaeLyn is a founding member of the WOC^ART Collaborative, a multi-generational collective of Black womxn & womxn of color creators in Rochester NY. In 2012, KaeLyn was co-editor of the inaugural edition of the ImageOutWrite Literary Journal, a collection of writing by and about LGBTQ authors. She penned a monthly queer women’s health column in the Empty Closet from 2007-2010. In 2014, she co-authored an article on feminist praxis in student leadership programs published in Feminist Community Engagement: Achieving Praxis (Palgrave Macmillan). Her creative work was showcased at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference as part of the 2004 Creative Writing Series.

KaeLyn is a founding board member and the first volunteer co-trainer of Connect & Breathe, a taboo-breaking after-abortion talkline. She served on the board of ImageOut: the Rochester LGBT Film & Video Festival for six years, during which served on various committees from strategic planning to special events and watched a gazillion LGBTQ+ films. She also previously served on the state board of Planned Parenthood Advocates of New York.

KaeLyn holds B.A. degrees in women’s studies and English from SUNY College at Oswego and a M.A. in Liberal Studies degree from SUNY College at Brockport with an emphasis on feminist intersectionality in the nonprofit sector. She completed a graduate certificate in nonprofit management at SUNY College at Brockport in 2009. She teaches women and gender studies courses about LGBTQ+ cultures and histories at local colleges including SUNY College at Brockport and the University of Rochester."

 

GSWS 259-1 Food Matters: Gender, Religion, Ethnicity, and Consumerism 

Course Description

Central to human experience, food serves not only as a source of substance but also as a marker of our identities. Through our choices in food, we send complex messages to others about our family and culture, our religious, racial, and gender identities, our relationship with health and wellness, and our place in the world. Food production and consumption can be used to exercise power and to define and reinforce social and socioeconomic hierarchies in the modern world - but also to challenge them. Through a series of readings, films, lectures, cooking workshops, site visits, written reflections, and class discussions, students in this course will examine the significance of food from personal and global perspectives.


Instructor

bakhmetyeva
Tanya Bakhmetyeva

I am trained as a Modern Russian historian with a particular interest in women’s and religion history, but since the publication of my recent book, Mother of the Church: Sofia Svechina, the Salon, and the Politics of Catholicism in Nineteenth-Century Russia and France (Northern Illinois University Press, 2016; winner of 2018 Harry Koenig Book Award, American Catholic Historical Association), I have broadened my research to Eastern Europe, especially Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus, adding to my longstanding interest in gender and religion such topics as masculinity, gender and environment, ecofeminism, and gender and national identity. I am currently working on a new book project, Gendered Woods: Białowieza Forest, Gender, and Polish National Identity, which focuses on the past and present of the Białowieza forest. The rich history of the forest makes Białowieza a site where competing visions of Polish national and gender identity come together in a complex interplay of symbols, stories, and images, turning the forest into a highly contested ground that various groups use to negotiate Poland’s place and role in the EU and test their power to shape the country’s identity.

As one of the recipients of 2016 University of Rochester Research Award, Tanya Bakhmetyeva also works on an oral history research project in Ladakh, India where she conducts a study on gender and climate change.

 

GSWS 280-2 Intersectionality: the History of an Idea

Course Description

This course examines the origins, history, and present-day circulations of “intersectionality,” a concept first introduced into feminism’s critical lexicon in 1989 by legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw. For Crenshaw, “intersectionality” made visible the overlap and convergence of gender- and race-based structures of oppression through which Black women’s specific experiences of discrimination were frequently illegible and thus invisible to courts who understood legal claims of discrimination on the basis of race and sex through the experiences of African American men and white women, respectively. Since Crenshaw’s now classic essay first appeared, “intersectionality” has come to dominate U.S. feminism as an interpretive paradigm in academic research and teaching and as a powerful tool for feminist social critique and activism beyond the academy. Intersectionality is also today a major force for aesthetic and narrative innovation in the wider public sphere, as reflected in influential art and literature, popular music, and film and television of the recent decade.


In tracing this history, we will revisit Crenshaw’s foundational writings, some of the race-conscious legal theories and prior women-of-color feminisms that informed her interventions, and later Black feminist writing that took up this new critical paradigm. We will also attend to the wide theoretical reach of Crenshaw’s original concept, which scholars have deployed to understand the intersections of race and gender with other axes of difference—such as sexual orientation, disability, and immigration status—and to illuminate the complex operations of social oppressions beyond race- and gender-based discrimination, including Islamophobia, transphobia, homophobia, and ableism. Students will also engage intersectionality’s wider impact through several cultural objects and discourses that index this history. The course will conclude by looking at academic debates over intersectionality, which has faced critiques from within Black feminist thought, and Crenshaw’s most recent writings, including her response to intersectionality’s critics.


Instructor

eden
Eden Osucha

Prof. Osucha’s areas of research expertise include Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century American Literature and Culture, African American Studies, Legal Studies, Critical Race Studies, Visual Culture, Queer Studies, and Feminist Theory.

Her book manuscript, The Post-Racial Past: Race, Privacy and Identity Before the Obama Era, examines historical productions of the discourse commonly called “the post-racial” prior to the twenty-first century, at the intersections of law, literature, and media culture. The Post-Racial Past argues that contemporary post-racialism originates in the legal history of “privacy,” which Prof. Osucha traces beyond the formal recognition of a right to privacy in constitutional law to antebellum slave law that regarded the sovereignty of slave masters as a natural right rooted in the master-slave relation’s “private” nature. Through linked analyses of literary works and legal writing–including Supreme Court opinions, statutory laws, and legal scholarship–and visual texts from cinema and television to nineteenth-century commercial media, The Post-Racial Past argues that the legal right to privacy’s development via racialized technologies of publicity, surveillance, and sexuality made broader discourses of race, privacy, and identity increasingly enmeshed and conceptually interdependent. Exploring the acute racialization of a rights claim overtly linked, throughout its history, to gendered and sexuality-based identity claim, the book demonstrates how legal privacy anticipated, rehearsed, and consolidated post-racialism prior to its becoming, at the start of the Obama Era, a dominant ideology still pervasive within the political and cultural contradictions of American racism in the present.

AAAS 262 Black Feminism and Popular Culture

Course Description

The influence of Black people is a profound contribution to both culture and politics in America, and yet, anti-black racial injustice, police brutality, and violence against women and queer people persist throughout the country. To understand the complex relationships between gender, sexuality, and race, and cultural products and lived experiences, this course addresses questions of entertainment, artistic forms of resistance, and the relationship between cultural producers and capitalism. Rooted in Black feminism and critical race theory, in this course we examine contemporary art, movements, and popular culture to identify sites of contradiction at the intersections of identity, celebrity, capitalism, and feminisms, among other features at play. Topics include Colin Kaepernick’s political activism and Nike campaign, Lebron James’s HBO series The Shop, Beyonce’s feminism from Destiny’s Child to Lemonade, and social media phenomena such as “trending” and “cancel culture.” Texts include the work of cultural writers and theorists, Michelle Alexander, Hazel V. Carby, Brittany Cooper, Ralph Ellison, Roxane Gay, Audre Lorde, Quincy T. Mills, Jennifer C. Nash, Claudia Rankine, Phoebe Robinson, Omise’eke Tinsley, and Michelle Wallace.

Instructor

Alisa Victoria Prince is a doctoral candidate in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester. Based in critical race theory, her work focuses on the history of photography (particularly Black vernacular photography), the roles of race and gender in identity construction, and artistic forms of resistance. She is also interested in Black Feminist traditions, cultural politics, historiography, and genealogies of Blackness. Alisa serves as Managing Editor of InVisible Culture, a journal for visual culture. She is also a visual artist working in the photographic and printmaking mediums.