Undergraduate

Courses of Instruction

Below you will find a list of all undergraduate courses that have been offered.

NOTE: Not all of these courses are offered in any given year.

Definitive course listings are published before each semester. View Courses by term >

EES 100 INTRO TO OCEANOGRAPHY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 101 INTRODUCTION TO GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

This introductory geology class provides a broad overview of the earth sciences, from planetary evolution to the interplay of geology and climate. The course is a prerequisite for all undergraduate majors who are considering careers in the earth and environmental sciences, while also satisfying science requirements for other undergraduate majors. We will introduce the class with the unifying framework for Earth Science: plate tectonics. Throughout the semester we will look at the physical interactions between different realms on Earth, including the interior (core and mantle), the outer shell (termed lithosphere), oceans and atmosphere. We will explore the dynamic processes operating on Earth and how these processes have been recorded and have varied over the geologic history. During the last third of the semester, we will discuss geologic problems that have a particular relevance to humans, such as energy and mineral resources, water resources, climate and global change.

Prerequisites: Students are required to enroll in a lab section and are required to attend one field trip.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 102 EARTHQKS, VOLCANOES&MT RANGE

No description

EES 102Q EARTHQUAKES, VOLCANOES AND MOUNTAIN RANGES: A FIELD QUEST

Understanding how the Earth works starts with an appreciation of geological processes in action. To observe these dynamic processessuch as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and mountain formation, Earth scientists must travel to areas of geological youth, such as California. In this Quest, students are introduced to active geology through readings and discussion sections in preparation for a field excursion to California. Students will learn how to examine critically ideas on how Earth science systems work and how active processes affect society.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

EES 103 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Introduction to environmental science topics through case studies of two local issues. Lake Ontario investigatiaon will include topics of hydrology, ecology, air and water pollution, and domestic and international governance. Study of the Marcellus Shale will address energy consumption and production, risk assessment and public health, economics, and policy. Course concludes with critical analysis of technological "solutions" such as ethanol and nuclear power.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 104Q ENVIRONMENTAL QUEST IN THE FIELD & LABORATORY

In this quest, small groups of students will conduct an environmental investigation of an actual field site in the Rochester area. Through a series of experiments involving mapping, sampling, laboratory analysis and data interpretation, students will attempt to achieve an understanding of a specific environmental problem. The coordination of the lab experiments allows students to build on skills learned in previous sessions and to recognize the linkages among a variety of investigative approaches. The semester will culminate with the presentation of the results in a departmental forum.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

EES 105 INTRODUCTION TO CLIMATE CHANGE

This course will explore the Earth's dynamic climate system through lectures, discussions and computer-based modeling of climate processes. The course is designed to be accessible to all students. We will work toward an understanding of several fundamental and important questions. What are the main factors that determine the Earth's climate? What forces can drive climate to change? What can we learn from climate change in the Earth's distant past, when our planet experienced periods of both extreme cold and warmth? How do we know that our climate is now changing? What can we expect from the Earth's climate in the near future and how would it affect us?

Prerequisites: None
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 106 METEORITES & IMPACT CRATERS

An introduction to the geology of the solar system from the perspectives of earth science and the fascinating world of meteorites, asteroids, comets, and impact craters. Special emphasis is on the meteorite evidence for our understanding of planetary formation, the role of impacts and mass extinction, and the origin of the moon.

Last Offered: Fall 2011

EES 119 ENERGY AND SOCIETY

National and worldwide patterns of production and consumption of renewable and non-renewable energy sources and the connection of those patterns to socioeconomic conditions. For each resource, we consider the environmental effects of extraction, distribution, and consumption; how efficiently the resource is used and for what end uses; current reserves and projections for the future; socioeconomic and political factors affecting the resource's utilization. The course addresses interactions between energy use and climate change, food and water resources. NOTE: Juniors and Seniors in the natural sciences and engineering are required to enroll in EES 219.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 121 SUSTAINABLE FOOD SYSTEMS

This course will provide students with a foundational understanding of the environmental, economic and societal impacts of American food systems and sustainable agriculture. Through assigned reading, lectures, class discussion and field trips, students will learn about the American farming and food system through examination of one particular crop or product at a time. We will consider environmental inputs and outputs, economic profitability, and farm stewardship. We will also look at the food distribution system and our role as consumers.

Last Offered: Summer 2016

EES 201 EVOLUTION OF THE EARTH

Historical geology encompasses the (1) dynamic history of the physical earth: the development of land forms, rise and fall of ancient seas, movements of continents, etc., and (2) the evolution of historical geology such as paleontology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, geochronology, and plate tectonics, and a chronological survey of earth and life history, emphasizing the evolution of North America.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 201W EVOLUTION OF THE EARTH-THIS COURSE IS NO LONGER OFFERED AS A "W" SECTION

See EES 201 and EES Departmental Writing Plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement This course is no longer offered as a writing requirment section.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 202 EARTHQKS, VOLCANOES&MT RANGE

No description

EES 202Q PLATE TECTONICS AND ACTIVE GEOLOGIC PROCESSES IN CALIFORNIA

Understanding how the Earth works with an appreciation of geological processes in action. To observe these dynamic processes such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and mountain formation, Earth scientis must travel to areas of geological youth, such as California. In this course, students are introduced to active geology through readings and discussion sections in preparation for a field excurstion to California. Students will learn to examine critically ideas on how Earth science systems work and how active processes affect society. This course is the complement to EES 102Q, and is intended for geology and environmental science majors.

Last Offered: Spring 2013

EES 203 SEDIMENTOLOGY & STRATIGRAPHY

Sediments and sedimentary rocks cover or underlie much of the Earth's surface. In them are recorded both evidence of the processes responsible for shaping the planetary surface and the record of life. Sedimentary rocks contain enormous volumes of water; solid and fluid hydrocarbons, as well as other natural resources. Sediments and sedimentary rocks are very important to our way of life, and they are fascinating in and of themselves. This course describes and classifies sedimentary rocks towards understanding the processes that shape them and the environments in which they form.

Prerequisites: EES 101, EES 201
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 203W SEDIMENTOLOGY & STRATIGRAPHY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 204 MINERALOGY-THIS COURSE IS NO LONGER OFFERED

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the chemical and physical properties of the material constituents of the Earth and terrestrial planets, including minerals, rocks and lavas. The class will explore the relationship between the atomic structure and the properties of naturally-occurring solids, and the basic principles that govern the composition and occurrence of these materials. Laboratories are devoted to exercises in crystallography, X-ray diffraction, optical mineralogy and hand-specimen mineral identification.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Fall 2013

EES 204W EARTH MATERIALS

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the chemical and physical properties of the material constituents of the Earth and terrestrial planets, including minerals, rocks and lavas. The class will explore the relationship between the atomic structure and the properties of naturally-occurring solids, and the basic principles that govern the composition and occurrence of these materials. Laboratories are devoted to exercises in crystallography, X-ray diffraction, optical mineralogy and hand-specimen mineral identification. This is a writing requirement section

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 205 SOLID EARTH GEOPHYSICS

This course is intended for motivated students that are interested in an introduction to geophysics. Material covered will focus on deep Earth processes: an introduction to potential fields, gravity, heat flow, magnetic fields, propagation of seismic waves, and a bottom-up approach to core processes, mantle flow and plate tectonics.

Prerequisites: EES 101, MTH 143, PHY 114
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 206 PETROLOGY

Distribution, description, classification, and origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks in the light of theoretical-experimental multicomponent phase equilibria studies; use of trace elements and isotopes as tracers in rock genesis; hand specimen and microscopic examinations of the major rock types in the laboratory.

Prerequisites: EES 101, CHM 131, EES 204W
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 206W PETROLOGY & GEOCHEMISTRY-UPPER LEVEL WRITING REQUIREMENT

see EES 206 and EES Departmental Writing Plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement.

Prerequisites: EES 101, EES 204W, CHM 131
Last Offered: Spring 2013

EES 207 PRINCIPLES OF PALEONTOLOGY

This course is designed to introduce the basic principles of paleontology- the study of fossil organisms in the geological record. Topics to be covered include: taphonomy and the processes of fossilization, principles of evolution as evidenced by the fossil record, taxonomy and the recognition and naming of fossil species, biostratigraphy as a means of dating a rock and/or learning about ancient environments, geochemistry of fossils as a means to understand ancient habitats and behaviors. This course will include an overview of important fossil groups with hands-on experience and a field trip.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or EES 201 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 207W PRINCIPLES OF PALEONTOLOGY

See EES 207 and EES department writing plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or EES 201 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 208 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY

Geometric analysis of faults, folds, joints, foliation and lineation developed in deformed rocks. Mechanical properties of rock, theories of experimental rock deformation. Labs focus on analysis of structural data using geologic maps, and orthographic and stereographic projections. One-day weekend field trip.

Prerequisites: EES 101, 201 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 209 INTRO GEOCHEMISTRY

The purpose of this course is to introduce the aspects of chemistry that are especially applicable to the study of geologic processes. Students will learn about the chemical interactions between the atmosphere, oceans and rocks to develop an appreciation of the complexity, breadth, and scales of Earth-systems chemistry, and a general knowledge of relevant kinetic and thermodynamic (equilibrium)phenomena. Specifically, this course will explore the chemistry of crust- and mantle-derived rocks, but also the chemistry of low temperature fluids (aqueous geochemistry), and moderate-temperature fluid-rock interactions that occur during metamorphism in the crust. Students are expected to have completed university-level general chemistry and Mineralogy/Earth Materials prior to taking this course.

Prerequisites: EES 204W, EES 206 and intro-level Chemistry
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 211 GEOHAZARDS AND THEIR MITIGATION: LIVING ON AN ACTIVE PLANET

Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are violent manifestations of plate tectonics, the movement of the relatively rigid plates forming the Earth's outer shell. Ground movements and shaking from these events may generate tsunamis, slumping and mass wasting, and increase risk in other areas. Global and regional sealevel rise changes forces on the plates, motivating reconsideration of hazard assessments. Large volumes of aerosols and greenhouse gases are emitted during the volcanic eruptions, with implications for global climate change. The first third of the class focuses on the causative mechanisms of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis, volcanic-eruption induced climate change. The second third outlines the consequent hazards and forecasting efforts, and feedbacks between these processes. The final third of the course examines mitigation programs, with numerous case studies.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 211W GEOHAZ AND THEIR MITIGATION

Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are violent manifestations of plate tectonics, the movement of the relatively rigid plates forming Earth's outer shell. Ground movements and shaking from these events may generate tsunamis, slumping and mass wasting , and increase risk in other areas. Global and regional sealevel rise changes forces on the plates, motivating reconsideration of hazard assessments. Large volumes of aerosols and greenhouse gases are emitted during volcanic eruptions, with implications for global climate change. The first third of the class focuses on the causative mechanisms of earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamics and volcanic eruption induced climate change. The second third outlines the consequent hazards and forecasting efforts, and feedbacks between these processes. The final third of the course examines mitigation programs, with numerous case studies.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or Permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 212 CLIM CHNG PERS CHEM. OCEAN.

Most introductory courses to chemical oceanography cover a variety of topics that are only related because they are under the broad umbrella of chemical oceanography. Some of these topics include the carbon dioxide and inorganic carbon chemistry, salinity, marine nutrients, dissolved gases and organic constituents. Similarly, most discussions of climate change and chemical oceanography only touch on ocean acidification. This course seeks to provide the same broad prospective to conventional chemical oceanography courses but will interweave the unifying theme of climate change into these numerous and diverse topics.

Prerequisites: CHM 131 and MTH 161
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 213 HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES

Physical flow of water through the natural environment and use as a resource for human consumption. Physical and chemical properties, global water balance, basics of hydrology. Understanding and calculating water flows: precipitation, evaporation and evapotranspiration, surface and subsurface runoff, and atmospheric transport. Human uses: storage in dams, hydropower, municipal usage, agriculture, floods and water conservation.

Prerequisites: Students are required to sign up for a lab section.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 213W HYDROLOGY & WATER RESOURCES

See description for EES 213. This is the writing requirement section.

Prerequisites: Students are required to sign up for a lab section.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 214  GEOSPATIAL DATA ANALYSES

This advanced GIS and numerical methods course introduces basic data manipulation and evaluation tools for vector, raster, and 3D data. It serves as a foundation for statistical and spectral data analyses methods, and introduces forward and inverse modeling methods. Topics include review of geographical projections and spectral methods, gridding and kriging, filters, curve fitting and interpolation, least squares, matrix inversion, and numerical integration and differentiation. Assessment is through computer-based problem-solving and a small data analysis project.

Prerequisites: GIS class, CSC 161 or 171 or equivalent, MTH 165 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Last Offered: Fall 2015

EES 215 ENVIRONMENTAL AND APPLIED GEOPHYSICS

This course aims to image the internal structure of the oceans and continents using geophysical methods. Topics include physical processes occurring within Earth's plates, including solar and internal energy sources, movement of fluids in the oceans and plates. Geophysical methods used to detect these processes and to constrain physical properties, including seismic, electro-magnetic, gravity as measured from surface, subsurface and satellites. Laboratory examples include environmental site remediation, hydrocarbon and mineral exploration, archeological remote sensing, tsunami detection, and groundwater exploration.

Prerequisites: MTH 142/162 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 216 ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY

A course in the chemical and physical processes that shape our environment. These include groundwater flow and contaminant mitigation, chemistry of lakes, streams and the ocean, ocean-atmosphere interactions (ozone depletion) global warming and the greenhouse effect.

Prerequisites: EES 101, CHM 131, MTH 141
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 216W ENVIRONMENTAL GEOCHEMISTRY

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 218 ATMOSPHERIC GEOCHEMISTRY

The atmosphere helps to maintain habitable temperatures on our planet's surface, shields life from destructive cosmic and ultraviolet radiation and contains gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, which are essential for life. In this course we will work toward an understanding of several important questions. What is in the Earth's atmosphere? What are the sources and sinks of the most important gases in the atmosphere? How does the atmosphere affect the Earth's surface climate? What is the role of photochemistry in atmospheric composition? How does the atmosphere interact with the land and oceans? How has human activity affected the atmosphere?

Prerequisites: EES 101 or 103 or 105, CHM 131 or equivalent, MTH 141-142 or equivalent, CHM 132 or equivalent recommended but not required. Permission of instructor is required for majors other than GEO, EVS and ESP.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 219 ENERGY AND SOCIETY

National and worldwide patterns of production and consumption of renewable and non-renewable energy sources and the connection of those patterns to socioeconomic conditions. For each resource, we consider the environmental effects of extraction, distribution, and consumption; how efficiently the resource is used and for what end uses; current reserves and projections for the future; socioeconomic and political factors affecting the resource's utilization. The course addresses interactions between energy use and climate change, food and water resources. The science background will be more emphasized in additional readings and a separate discussion section. Students enrolling in EES 219 will be required to attend a weekly recitation section. NOTE: Juniors and Seniors in the natural sciences and engineering are required to enroll in EES 219.

Prerequisites: MTH 141 or 161
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 220 INTRODUCTION TO GEOBIOLOGY

Geobiology is the study of the interactions between the biosphere (living organisms and their products) and the geosphere (atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, cryosphere). This class will explore how the chemical and physical processes of the geosphere have influenced life and evolution and how life has influenced the Earth system during the roughly 4 billion years since life first appeared. Several topics will be particularly emphasized, such as the microbial weathering of minerals, bacterial and skeletal biomineralization, the roles of autotrophic and heterotrophic metabolisms in elemental cycling, the redox history in the oceans and its relationship to evolution and the origin of life itself.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 222 ENERGY RESOURCES

Examines the mechanisms of oil and natural gas formation: The time, temperature and pressure conditions. Explores the geochemical and isotopic fingerprints that lead to successful exploitation of hydrocarbon resources.

Prerequisites: CHM 131, 132; EES 101, MTH 161, 162
Last Offered: Fall 2015

EES 231 ICE SHTS,GLACIERS,CLIM CHNG

The flow of glacier ice and climate-ice interactions affect the state of the cryosphere and impact critical aspects of the Earth system. Our understanding of present and past behavior of glaciers and ice sheets is key to anticipating likely future change in global sea level. We will explore fundamental glaciological processes and work to understand the current state of mountain glaciers, ice caps, and the polar ice sheets through a mix of lectures, current and classic readings from the literature, and in-class discussions. This seminar course is appropriate for advanced undergraduates (EES 231) as well as graduate students (EES 431).

Prerequisites: EES 101 or 103 or 105 (or equivalent) MTH 161-162 (or equivalent), PHY 113 (or equivalent)
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 232 SEMINAR IN MARINE BIOGEOCHM

The "biological pump" is the suite of biogeochemical processes that lead to carbon sequestration in the deep ocean, out of contact with the atmosphere, and is an important regulator of global climate. This seminar will review the seminal works that have sought to understand and quantify the component processes: 1) the production of organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton in the sunlit surface ocean; 2) aggregation of organic matter into sinking particles; 3) degradation of those particles over depth. We will then review evidence for the changing strength of the biological pump over Earth's history, and the attempts to predict its response to current climate warming.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 233 MARINE ECOSYS&CARBN CYC MOD

Over the last few decades, numerical biogeochemical models have provided new insights into the marine carbon cycle, its contribution to past climate change, and its potential responses to future climate warming. In this practical class, students will build simple biogeochemical models-ranging from "box" models of marine microbial ecosystems to three-dimensional nutrient cycling models-and design experiments to address climate change hypotheses. They will also be taught to analyze output from state-of-the-art climate models used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Students will not only learn invaluable programming skills, but also gain a deeper intuition of the ocean carbon cycling and its role in the global climate system.

Prerequisites: No prior computing experience is required: an extensive grounding will be provided in the MATLAB programming language that will be used throughout the course.
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 234 FUND. ATMOSPHERIC MODELING

Global atmospheric models are critical research and policy tools used to understand and predict the weather, climate change, and air pollution. This course provides an applied introduction to the physics, chemistry, and numerical methods underlying simulations of the spatial and temporal evolution of mass, energy, and momentum in planetary atmospheres. Topics include: finite-differencing the equations of atmospheric dynamics, radiative transfer models, numerical methods for solving systems of chemical ordinary differential equations, parameterization of small-scale processes, surface exchanges, inverse modeling, and model evaluation techniques. Assignments focus on the implementation and application of simple models by students; no prior experience with scientific programming will be assumed. Students will also gain experience using state-of-the-science models of atmospheric chemistry and/or climate in a final project of their choosing.

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: EES 105 or EES 218 or equivalent; MTH 165 or equivalent; CHM 131-132 or equivalent; PHY 121 or equivalent; or permission of instructor. PHY 255 or equivalent recommended but not required.
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 240 OPTICAL MINERALOGY-THIS COURSE IS NO LONGER OFFERED

Principles of optical crystallography and their applications in the identification of rock-forming minerals, mostly the silicates, with the polarizing microscope.

Prerequisites: EES 101, EES 204 or permission of instructor

EES 247 CHEM. EVOLUTION OF THE EARTH

We will discuss the main geochemical characteristics of the major reservoirs that comprise the solid Earth, the processes by which they formed and evolved, and the analytical tools used for their study. We will cover topics of high-temperature geochemistry, extinct radionuclides, and radiogenic and stable isotope geochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the formation of Earth's continental crust. This course is cross-listed with EES 447.

Prerequisites: General knowledge of Mineralogy and petrology. EES 206-Petrology required for undergraduates

EES 247W CHEM. EVOLUTION OF THE EARTH

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 248 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOCHEMISTRY

An introduction to the principles of geochemistry. The first portion of the course is devoted to basics, especially thermodynamics, and isotope (both stable and radio-) geochemistry. The middle portion of the course deals with high temperataure processes and crystallization. The last part of the course covers lower temperature processes including weathering, sediment diagenesis and element cycling through the lithosphere.

Prerequisites: EES 101, CHM 103
Last Offered: Spring 2011

EES 250 SEMINAR IN GEODESY

This course introduces students to theory and methods in geodesy. Topics include geoid and gravity field derivation and products, space-based geodetic methods, and their use in crustal deformation and mantle dynamics studies.

Prerequisites: PHY 114/122 and MTH 162 (165 recommended)
Last Offered: Fall 2013

EES 251 INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS

This course combines lectures and hands-on weekly labs, to introduce students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and concepts. Using both commercial (ArcGIS) and open source software (QGIS, OpenLayers), we will cover: GIS data structures, map projections, collecting and creating GIS data, map making, exploring spatial patterns and data visualization. Topics will be framed using examples across disciplines (e.g. physical sciences, humanities and social sciences). At the end of the semester, students will complete a final project, in which they can apply their learning to their own major area of study. Despite the technical nature of this course, no prerequisites are required and material is appropriate for all students. Student learning will be assessed throughout the semester via class participation, a mid-term exam and the final project.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 252 MARINE GEOLOGY

This course will provide a comprehensive review of modern marine geology with an emphasis on the deep sea. Areas identified by the international ocean drilling community as of high research priority will be discussed, including new techniques used to study such problems. Four subject areas will be addressed: lithosphere, tectonics, ocean history and sedimentary geochemistry and physical processes.

Prerequisites: EES 101
Last Offered: Spring 2015

EES 253 GEODYNAMICS

Processes that create and modify Earth and the terrestrial planets are examined using an "earth engineering" approach. Emphasis is placed on plate tectonics, with discussion of current research in mantle convection. The final third of the course focuses on active plate tectonic boundaries, and evidence for plate tectonics on Mars and Venus.

Prerequisites: MTH 142/162
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 254 GEO INFO SYS:EARTH SCIENCE APPLLICATIONS

This course will provide an introduction to Geographic Information Systems, with an emphasis on their applications to issues in the Earth and Environmental Sciences. Examples of applications may include land use (and environmental contamination) and its relationship to geology, hydrology and climate. Other applications (time permitting) will include a survey of computer packages routinely used in the marine geoscience community.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or permission of instructor

EES 255 PLANETARY SCIENCE: GEOLOGIC EVOLUTION

This course will focus on geologic and geophysical studies of planets (interiors and surfaces), and the conditions that led to the origin of life. We will start with initial conditions, defined here as the formation of Earth and the Moon-forming event, and trace development of the planet from cooling of the magma ocean onwards. We next consider how our planetary neighbors (Venus and Mars) evolved, as well as key satellites in the solar system that may harbor life, or provide insight into early conditions on Earth.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or 201 strongly recommended.
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 255W PLANETARY SCI-GEOL EVOLUTN

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 256 PALEOMAGNETISM & GLOBAL PLATE TECTONICS

The basic paleomagnetic methods used to determine absolute plate motions are reviewed. Applications include the potential cause and effect relationship between changes in absolute plate motions, mantle plume volcanism, orogeny, and climate change.

Prerequisites: EES 101
Last Offered: Fall 2014

EES 257 SEISMIC REFLECTION ANALYSES AND INTERPRETATION

Geothermal, groundwater and petroleum exploration and extraction rely on subsurface information. 2D and 3D seismic reflection methods are a foundation in many basin regions, as well as crustal studies. Students will review data acquisition and processing methods to understand limitations and potential artifacts in seismic reflection data sets. A major component of the class is a problem-solving project involving seismic reflection data and calibrations with well, rock outcrop and other data. Students will work independently and in teams.

Prerequisites: PHY 121/equivalent required EES 205/215 recommended
Last Offered: Spring 2015

EES 258 HOTSPOTS & PLATE MOTIONS SEMINAR

This course will provide a basic understanding of hotspot models, hotspot fixity and the relationships between hotspots, mantle plumes, true polar wander and plate motions. Hypothesis development and testing will be discussed, as will the basic elements of grantsmanship

Prerequisites: EES 101 or equivalent or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2015

EES 258W HOTSPOTS & PLATE MOTIONS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2013

EES 259 SEMINAR IN PALEOMAGNETISM

Current topics in paleomagnetism and rock magnetism are explored through literature reviews and modeling studies. Topics range from the history of plate tectonics to biogenic magnetism. An introduction to basic concepts in paleomagnetism and rock magnetism is included.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 260 SEMINAR IN EARLY EARTH GEOCHEMISTRY

this course is not being offered at this time

Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 261 STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

Most courses in stable isotopes highlight the analytical techniques and classic examples of applications of stable isotopes. However, the stable isotope investigations in this course will stress the fundamentals of stable isotope models, along with their underlying assumptions, guided by several classic applications. Not only will we learn the equations used in these pioneering applications, but we will set-up and derive these equations. The goal of this course is to equip students with the knowledge needed to both dissect as well as manipulate traditional stable isotope models so that they can analyze their data in the most appropriate and intelligent fashion.

Prerequisites: MTH 161-162 and CHM 131-132
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 263 INTRO THERMODYNAMICS & KINETICS

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the equilibrium and kinetic processes that govern the elemental and isotopic composition of rocks and minerals. The course will be divided into two broadly equal components. In the first part, the fundamentals of thermodynamics, phase diagrams, and selected examples in earth systems will be explored. The second half of the course is devoted to understanding the non-equilibrium case for earth materials; diffusion in minerals and melts is emphasized. Students are expected to have a general knowledge of mineralogy, petrology, and very basic thermodynamics prior to taking this course.

EES 264 PALEOENVIRONMENTAL RECONTRUCTIONS USING LIGHT STABLE ISOTOPES

This class will focus on techniques used in environmental reconstruction to address questions related to paleoclimate, paleotemperature, paleovegetation and paleoelevation. We will examine the use of stable isotopes in paleoenvironmental reconstruction with particular emphasis on O,C, and to a lesser extent H and N isotopes. The class will start with a thorough introduction of the geological framework of the environments of interest and the processes of light isotope fractionation. This will be followed by "emphasis areas" that highlight the basics and latest developments in a variety of environmental systesm, including the oceans, rivers, ice, lakes, soils and fossils.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or EES 103 (open to juniors and seniors)
Last Offered: Spring 2015

EES 264W PALEOENVIRONMENTAL RECONTRUCTIONS USING LIGHT STABLE ISOTOPES

This class will focus on techniques used in environmental reconstruction to address questions related to paleoclimate, paleotemperature, paleovegetation and paleoelevation. We will examine the use of stable isotopes in paleoenvironmental reconstruction with particular emphasis on O,C, and to a lesser extent H and N isotopes. The class will start with a thorough introduction of the geological framework of the environments of interest and the processes of light isotope fractionation. This will be followed by "emphasis areas" that highlight the basics and latest developments in a variety of environmental systesm, including the oceans, rivers, ice, lakes, soils and fossils.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or 103 (open to juniors and seniors
Last Offered: Spring 2011

EES 265 PALEOCLIMATE

The Earth's climate is changing in a potentially fundamental way because of human activity. In this course we will look into Earth's climate history in order to gain a better understanding of how the climate system works and what we can expect from Earth's climate in the future. During its history, the Earth has gone through periods that were much warmer as well as periods that were much colder than today. By examining the geological record of the environmental conditions, we can gain insights into how key parameters such as greenhouse gas concentrations, insolation and postions of the continents influence the climate system.

Prerequisites: EES 101 or 103 (or equivalent), MTH 161-162 (or equivalent), CHM 131 (or equivalent)
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 266 ICE CORE RECORDS of CLIMATE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE

This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and will provide an introduction to the exciting field of ice core research. We will cover the basics of ice core science in the first few sessions, and then continue with more in-depth sessions on some of the most important and interesting questions in the ice core field. A large component of the course will be reading, presentation and discussion of the research literature. Students will be expected to write either an individual or a group review paper on an ice-core related question of their choice.

Prerequisites: MTH 161-162 or equivalent, CHM 131 or equivalent, PHY 113 or equivalent, and one of: EES 101, 103 or 105.
Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 267 ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

Causes for differences in the isotopic composition of elements. Nucleosynthesis, fractionation, radioactive decay and cosmogenic production. Evolution of crust and mantle, formation of ore deposits, tracing of fluid movements, history of cosmic ray flux and other applications of stable and unstable isotopic systems to geologic problems.

Last Offered: Fall 2016

EES 268 CHEMICAL & ISOTOPIC HYDROLOGY

An integrated approach to groundwater hydrogeology applying physical, chemical, isotopic and dating data. The course will be based on case studies and exercising of data processing.

Prerequisites: EES 216

EES 269 STABLE ISOTOPES IN GEOCHEMISTRY

This course will examine the distribution of the stable isotopes of hydrogen, carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in biological sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous processes.

Prerequisites: EES 248/448 EES 467 or permission of instructor

EES 270 VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY

This course will cover the fossil record of vertebrate animals. Topics to be covered include: The origin of vertebrates, phylogenetic relationships among modern vertebrates, introductory osteology and comparative anatomy of vertebrates, the advent of bone, the transition to land, the origin of flight in vertebrates, the warm-blooded vs cold-blooded controversy in dinosaurs, the relationship between birds and dinosaurs, hominid evolution and the origin of man. Readings from the current scientific literature will be used.

Prerequisites: EES 207
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 270W VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY-UPPER LEVEL WRITING REQUIREMENT

See EES 270 and EES Departmental Writing Plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement.

Prerequisites: EES 207
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 274 SEMINAR IN PALEOCEANOGRAPHY

This class will explore the changes in oceanic circulation through geological time and the tools available to scientists to reconstruct these changes. A general overview of the modern ocean circulation, sediment distribution, and stratigraphy will be given. Paleoceanographic proxies and analytical techniques will be discussed in great detail, with particular emphasis on proxy calibration and technique limitations. Several case studies in the evolution of ocean circulation during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic will be covered, in particular, through the reading and discussion of scientific journal articles.

Prerequisites: none
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 283 SEDIMENTARY BASIN ANALYSIS

We will discuss basin classification schemes, isostasy, flexural and thermal subsidence, effects of mantle dynamics, basin stratigraphy, and techniques used to study sedimentary basin evolution. By determining how sedimentary basins develop and fill, we will better understand the tectonic and eustatic controls on subsidence and surficial processes.

Prerequisites: The prerequisite for undergraduates is EES 203-Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. There is no prerequisite for graduate students.
Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 283W SEDIMENTARY BASIN ANALYSIS

We will discuss basin classification schemes, isostasy, flexural and thermal subsidence, effects of mantle dynamics, basin stratigraphy, and techniques used to study sedimentary basin evolution. By determining how sedimentary basins develop and fill, we will better understand the tectonic and eustatic controls on subsidence and suficial processes.

Prerequisites: The prerequisite for undergraduates is EES 203-Sedimentology and Stratigraphy. There is no prerequisite for graduate students.
Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 285 STRUCTURE AND TECTONICS OF MOUNTAIN BELTS

Orogeny and its relationship to plate tectonics. Structural style and tectonic history of mountain belts with special reference to the Appalachians and Cordilleras. Homework assignments involve drawings and interpreting cross-sections through mountain belts. Field trip to the Appalachians to look at typical structures of mountain belts.

Prerequisites: EES 208 or equivalent
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 285W STRC&TECTONICS OF MONT BELTS

See EES 285 and EES department writing program. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement.

Prerequisites: EES 208 or equivalent
Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 286 SEMINAR IN SEDIMENTOLOGY & TECTONICS

Interpreting the lithofacies and chemistry of sedimentary rocks to understand paleoenvironment; impact of tectonics on climate. Topics will vary each semester. Classwork will involve readings, presentations and discussions of classic and current literature.

Prerequisites: EES 101, EES 203 recommended
Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 286A SEM.SEDIMENTOLOGY&TECTONICS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2012

EES 286W SEM.SEDIMENTOLOGY&TECTONICS

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 287 CLIMATE AND TECTONIC INTERACTIONS

This class will focus on current topics on the interactions between climate and tectonics, such as how the growth of large mountain belts has modulated global climate over time and how climate influences the tectonic evolution of mountain belts. The first several weeks of the semester will be focused on an introduction to the region of study and the climate-tectonic processes of interest. The rest of the class will be focused on a review of recent literature. Students will choose a research topic and develop their grant-writing skill through a class-related project.

Last Offered: Fall 2014

EES 288 GEOMETRY & MECHANICS OF THRUST FAULTS

Geometry of thrust faults and thrust belts. Mechanics of thrust motion and thrust emplacement. Homework assignments and readings on current literature. Requires one major term paper that will require revision after initial review. Field trip to the Appalachians to look at typical structures of fold-thrust belts

Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 288W GEO & MECH OF THRUST FAULTS

See EES 288 and EES Departmental Writing Plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement

Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 298 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH METHODS

A basic introduction to research in the Earth and Environmental Sciences will be provided in one of the laboratories that comprise the Departments Center for Analytical Geosciences.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 299 FIELD GEOLOGY

This course covers the essential geologic and geophysical approaches to field stratigraphy, mapping, and structural interpretation. The coursework is based on observations made during a substantial field excursion (usually six weeks long). Additional credit may be earned by laboratory analysis of samples collected during the field excursion.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 299W FIELD GEOLOGY

This course covers the essential geologic and geophysical approaches to field stratigraphy, mapping, and structural interpretation. The coursework is based on observations made during a substantial field excursion (usually six weeks long). Additional credit may be earned by laboratory analysis of samples collected during the field excursion.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Last Offered: Fall 2016

EES 307 ADV SEM CLIMATE & ENV CHNG

This seminar will focus on the IPCC 2013 Working Group I report (Physical Science Basis). The IPCC stands for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and is the main international organization for assessing the current state of scientific knowledge for global climate change. The IPCC reports are a result of contributions from thousands of scientists from all over the world, and are a comprehensive summary of the current state of climate change research. The course will be conducted in a reading-and-discussion format. Students will be expected to lead some of the discussions as well as actively participate in all of the discussions

Prerequisites: at least 1 of EES 212, EES 218 or EES 265
Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 310 MULTIDIS.TOPICS SUSTAINABIL

The goal of this course is to acquaint students with a range of topics in the natural and social sciences that relate to environmental change. Studens will attend weekly lectures in the Sustainability Speakers Series, to be given by faculty from around the University of Rochester and neighboring institutions. In addition to attending lectures, students will read material relevant to each week's lecture topics, and will participate in discussions that will follow the lectures. Grading will be based on attendance and active participation in lectures and discussios, as well as periodic written assignments.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 310W SCIENCE & SUSTAINABILITY

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 312W RESEARCH OCEAN BIOGEOCHEM I

This course will follow the scientific process conducting oceanographic research in the laboratory and at sea.This course will begin during the Spring semester and extend into summer with a reserarch expedition at sea lasting approximately 2 weeks and will conclude during the Fall semester (EES 313W). During the Spring (EES 312W) this course will meet for 2 credit hours.Students work together and with instructor to develop scientific hypotheses related to modern oceanographic biogeochemical processes. Students develop experimental plans to test hypotheses, formulate written research proposal and begin their experiments. During the summer students will enact their scientific plan at sea collecting samples and making measurements with the instructor, other scientists and graduate students. During the Fall semester (EES 313W) students reconvene for additional 2 credits to analyze data and create formal presentations of their scientific work in both written and oral formats.

Prerequisites: EES 212/412 NOTE: STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR BOTH EES 312W AND EES 313W TO RECEIVE FULL CREDIT FOR THIS COURSE.
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 313 RESEARCH BIOGEOCHEM II

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2016

EES 313W RESEARCH BIOGEOCHEM II

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2014

EES 314W TOP QUATERNARY GEOMORPHOLOGY

Investigate glacial environments in terms of sediments and landforms with a particular focus on the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Detailed, ongoing research on subglacial environments, glacial sedimentology and Quaternary geochronology are presented. Practical exercises studying landform assemblages and surficial sediments provide a comprehensive knowledge base with which interpretation of glacier processees and history can be made. This is a closure course class for EVS and ESP majors and will involve a research project based on one of the topics of discussion in the class.

Last Offered: Spring 2014

EES 318W ENVIRONMENTAL DECISIONS

Discusssion of major environmental issues such as water use, pollution and energy availability. Analysis of decisions resulting in environmental change. The interaction of scientists with the public and policymakers. Seminar format with oral presentations and papers. A writing course.

Last Offered: Spring 2010

EES 319 ENERGY DECISIONS

No description

EES 319W ENERGY DECISIONS

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 320 SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

Definitions and metrics of sustainability. Properties of systems. Relevant issues at different scales, from building to campus to community. Resource use, waste production, procurement policies, transportation, and social dimensions. This is a closure course for EVS and ESP majors

Prerequisites: EES 103 or permission of instructor
Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 320W SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS

See EES 320 and EES Department Writing Plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement.

Last Offered: Spring 2016

EES 352 EES ISS IN GROUP LEADERSHIP

Designed for Workshop leaders. This course offers training in group dynamics, learning theory and science pedagogy. The larger goals for this course are to develop leadership skills, to foster ongoing communication among faculty members and Workshop leaders, and to provide an environment for focused review of Workshop modules. This section of CAS/EES 352 will train undergraduate Workshop leaders for Introduction to Geological Sciences (EES 101)

Last Offered: Fall 2015

EES 360 ENVIRONMENTAL QUEST IN THE FIELD

This course provides instruction in laboratory techniques used in the analysis of natural waters. The laboratory techniques are applied to the study of local environmental problems and include instruction in atomic absorption spectrophotometry; ion and gas chronatography, as well as standard “wet” chemical techniques.

Prerequisites: CHM 103/104, MTH 161, EES 217
Last Offered: Fall 2012

EES 390 SUPERVISED COLLEGE TEACHING

Attendance of all primary class lectures. Assist in at least one laboratory session per week and general preparation for answering student questions. Preparation and delivery of at least one laboratory lecture and summary discussion following the lab. Assistance with setup and dismantling of extensive lab displays of rocks, fossils and maps. Assistance with grading of lab quizzes and homework assignments and in proctoring exams.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 391 INDEPENDENT STUDY

Students must have permission. Interested students should meet with their advisor regarding course content.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 391W INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES-UPPER LEVEL WRITING REQUIREMENT

Permission of instructor required.See EES 391 and EES Departmental Writing Plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement.

Last Offered: Spring 2017

EES 393 SENIOR THESIS

Students should seek out the faculty member he/she wishes to do a senior thesis with. Students should pick up independent course forms from Lattimore 312. Course is suited to each students abilities. Questions should be directed to your major advisor

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 393W SENIOR THESIS-UPPER LEVEL WRITING REQUIRMENT

See EES 393 and EES Departmental Writing Plan. This section fulfills the upper level writing requirement. Students should seek out the faculty member he/she wishes to do a senior thesis with. Students should pick up independent course forms from Lattimore 312. Course is suited to each students abilities. Questions should be directed to your major advisor.

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 394 INTERNSHIP IN EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Students should contact their major advisor for details. Closure course for Environmental Studies majors (ESP) and Environmental Science majors (EVS)

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 395 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

No description

Last Offered: Fall 2017

EES 396 SPECIAL TOPICS IN EES

No description

Last Offered: Spring 2015